• Justin Trudeau and 5 Other Successful English Majors
    On October 19, Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party won a decisive victory in the Canadian national election. The prime-minister designate assumes office in November, and has already started movement on his campaign promises, but even if you don't care about Canadian politics (or any politics) there are a few interesting things to note about Canada's next prime minister. For starters, liberal arts majors can rejoice, because Trudeau has, among other degrees, a bachelor's in English literature from McGill. There's an answer, the next time your parents ask you, "What are you going to do with that English degree?"
  • How to Work Up the Courage to Change Careers
    So, you're ready to move on. Whether you've decided to change careers because you want a fresh challenge or because your industry doesn't feel like a good fit for you anymore, making this bold move can feel pretty scary. But ultimately, if you're really ready for a change, you'll probably be glad you did it. Still, it can be awfully difficult to take the plunge, even once you've decided it's definitely what you want to do. Here are some tips to help.
  • 4 Reasons People Skills Are More Important Than Ever
    We all know that technology has changed the way we work. With all of the talk of STEM jobs, telecommuting, and social networking, it can seem as though perhaps the skills that mattered most years ago have fallen out of fashion. As long as you can saddle up to new technology and navigate the internets effectively, you should be all set, right? Wrong. It turns out people skills are even more important than ever. Here are a few reasons why.
  • Amazon to New York Times: 'Stack of Negative Anecdotes' Doesn't Represent Amazon Culture
    Two months ago, The New York Times ran a piece on working at Amazon that went on to become its most commented-on story so far, with 6,600 comments by the paper's count. The article depicted a workplace in which 80-hour weeks were common, and work-life balance in short supply. Famously, the reporters cited one former Amazonian who said, "Nearly every person I worked with, I saw cry at their desk." Now, Amazon is responding to that portrait, claiming that the stories included in the article were biased, or presented without context, and that they don't add up to an accurate picture of what it's like to work at Amazon.
  • Is Listening to Music at Work Really Good for Productivity?
    Some people like to listen to music while they work, believing that it helps them improve their focus, and maybe even their mood. But, is there any truth behind the idea that listening to music around the office is good for productivity? Might some music do the trick better than others? We looked to science for some answers. Here are a few things we discovered.
  • What to Do When You Are Awful at Phone Interviews
    If your resume is shortlisted and your recruiter is calling or emailing you to set up a phone interview, you may have mixed feelings. On the one hand, it's exciting to hear from someone in the company you are interested in, while on the other hand, phone interviews are often not the best platform to present how awesome you are.
  • Is There Really a Problem With How Millennials Behave at Work?
    Even if you missed the season premiere of Saturday Night Live a few weeks ago, you probably saw the skit called The Millennials, which took a certain generation to task on their workplace conduct. Casual dress, the hunched posture that comes with near incessant smartphone interaction, and an entitled lack of self awareness that's become synonymous with the so-called "Me Me Me" generation. But is this merely a caricature of bad stereotype, or is it true that we literally cannot even get workplace etiquette right?
  • Office Horror Stories: The 10 Scariest Co-Workers Ever
    What's more terrifying that than the scariest ghost story you've ever heard? Going to work with some of these folks. We asked Facebook users to share their tales involving co-workers whose bizarre and unprofessional behavior made the fact that they had jobs stranger than fiction. These stories will remind you that the real-life experience of going to work offers plenty of scares – no ghosts or goblins necessary.
  • Is Getting Into an Elite School the Only Way to Define Success?
    Upon entering high school, I was under the impression that my life would resemble that of Marissa Cooper from The OC, coming home past my curfew because I was out with a cute boy or getting into some shenanigans with my best gal pals. If we ignore the blatant reality that I was not a wealthy, blonde teenager (who was obviously at least 25), my high school experience was still vastly different from the one depicted on the television programs I watched. In retrospect, I believe my high school experience more closely resembles Olivia Pope's narrative on Scandal; I was constantly under pressure to appear perfect.
  • 5 Surprising Facts About Lunch Breaks
    Most of the time, lunch doesn't really feel like that big of a deal. If we're able to take a lunch break, we generally feel glad, and enjoy a short respite from the craziness of the workday. Often though, we lunch at our desks, or on our feet, unable to take the time to sit down and eat, even just for a few minutes. Still though, what does it really matter? Well, here are a few surprising facts about lunch breaks that might inspire you to pay a little more attention to how you spend this time.
  • Cards Against Humanity's Most Surprising Move Yet
    There's a lot of bad news out there, and we seem to love to talk about it. In fact, sometimes we make things out to be a lot worse than they are. As Nicholas Kristof recently pointed out, our current political climate causes us to ignore the positive strides the world is making every day. In that light, let's take this opportunity to laud a shining example of corporate philanthropy in a place you probably wouldn't expect it: a naughty card game.
  • Your Standing Desk Is No Healthier Than a Regular Old Sitting Desk, Study Finds
    Bad news, standing-desk fans: according to a study from Exeter University and University College London, you're getting sore feet for nothing. After following 5,000 people over the course of 16 years, researchers determined that standing desks are no better for your health than standard ones. Being still, they contend, whether standing or sitting, is bad for your health.
  • How to Survive an Open Office If You're an Introvert
    Big, open spaces crammed full of bodies with nothing to break up the sound of a workday frenzy: sounds great, right? While open offices seemed like a way to promote collaboration (and save money by putting more employees per square foot), the trend does have its drawbacks, especially if you're a bit more turtle than tiger at work. Here's how to cope when your privacy at work goes bye-bye.
  • Why California's Equal Pay Law Is a Step In the Right Direction
    On Tuesday, the California Fair Pay Act was signed into law. Different from other equal pay legislation, it mandates that women receive equal pay for "substantially similar work." California women make about 84 percent of what men make (higher than the national average of 78 percent), but women of color are the most disproportionately affected by the gender pay gap: African-American women bringing in 64 cents on the dollar, and Latina women making 44 cents.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Build a LinkedIn Profile Recruiters Will Love
    LinkedIn is a rare bird in the social media landscape: it's extremely useful for its specific purpose – building your career – but not necessarily a place to hang out online, like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. As a result, it's easy to let your LinkedIn profile slide when you get a promotion or take on new responsibilities, and not realize it until the absence of recruiter attention calls the issue to mind. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to make your LinkedIn profile shine, plus why being a good helper isn't always the best thing for your career, and a few tips on getting unstuck when you're in a rut.
  • Workplace Lulz: Bacon Bits Are the Key to Career Success
    With help from our friends at Reddit, your Friday is about to get significantly better. Take some advice from awkward seal and this dog dressed up in a suit as we take on the hilarious and sometimes sensitive issues we often experience in the workplace. Today, we cover everything from understanding your benefits to how to deal when your co-worker brings his pet goat to your BBQ. Oh, and Bacon Bits.
  • Hey, Men: Gender Equality Is Good for You Too!
    In his TED Talk last spring, Michael Kimmel spoke about something he knows something about: men and privilege. Not only is he a middle-class white male (arguably the most privileged since the dawn of time, by his estimation), but he's also a sociologist and author who studies how equality (or lack thereof) affects everyone, not just those left out in the cold.
  • 7 Things You Should NEVER Say to Co-Workers
    Given the amount of time we spend at work, it's understandable that a lot of us get pretty comfortable there. It's a good thing when you can really be yourself at work, and it's nice to have friends there, too. But, no matter how much your workplace feels like a home away from home, the truth is that it isn't. Your workplace is a professional environment, and there are some lines that should never be crossed. Let's take a look at a few things that you should never say to your co-workers. Really. Never.
  • To See How Few Women There Are at the Top, Photoshop Out the Men
    If you watched the Democratic primary debate last night, one thing probably stood out to you, regardless of your political leanings: Hillary Clinton was the only woman on the stage. In fact, as far as American politics is concerned, one out of five is just about the norm: currently, women hold 104 out of 535 seats in Congress, a 19.4 percent average. (It gets worse if you look at women of color – 31.7 percent of the number of women, and just 6.2 percent of the total.) Of course, we love data, but numbers can seem abstract. Sometimes, you can't beat a good visualization to really see the problem. Recently, British Elle's feminism issue gave us just that, with a video that shows men gradually removed from photos of politics in action ... leaving just a few women behind.
  • The 3 Most and Least Recession-Recovered Cities
    Since the Great Recession, cities have been struggling to recover their housing markets, job opportunities, and economies overall. The recovery has been spotty – in some cities and states more than in others.

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