• Please Don't Play Any of These Horrible April Fools' Pranks at Work
    Depending on your perspective, April Fools' Day is either the highlight of the year -- or a great day to work from home. Even if you're totally anti the entire concept of April Fools', you have to admit that some pranks function as a kind of team-building exercise: something funny happens, everyone has a laugh and blows off steam, and hopefully, co-workers feel closer. Unfortunately, when pranks go wrong, they go really wrong, leaving a trail of hurt feelings and dented career prospects in their wake.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 189,000 Jobs in March
    Private companies added 189,000 jobs last month, according to this morning's ADP National Employment Report, fewer than the 225,000 predicted by economists and the lowest gains in over a year.
  • 6 Tips for Looking Like Management Material
    Hollywood would like us to believe that everyone goes to school, works hard, and quickly winds up in their dream job. From pauper to Wall Street, shy guy to leading man, or mailroom clerk to CEO, it's all about that fairytale ending. Now brush the popcorn from your lap and let your eyes readjust to the light, because the movie's over and we're heading back to reality.
  • Spot These 5 Signs of a Bad Employer, During the Interview
    First things first: there's no way to tell, with absolute certainty, what it will be like to work for a company before you sign on the dotted line. That said, you can do your due diligence ahead of time to figure out whether the corporate culture is a good fit for you and up your chances of making the right choice. Research the company on the internet and pay attention to its interactions with employees and customers on social media -- but most of all, watch for these important signs when you meet with the hiring manager during your interview.
  • Depressed and Need Help? Here's Where to Find It
    It's an especially tough time to be having a tough time at work. Thanks to the proliferation of social media and the 24-hour news cycle, anyone with access to a screen sees dozens of references to the latest tragedy every day. Occasionally, those sad stories include a perpetrator who allegedly suffered from mental illness. Leaving aside for a moment the issue of whether or not it's fair for pundits to appoint themselves mental health professionals and diagnose a cause and effect, it's hard to see -- especially if you're feeling less than well yourself.
  • 5 Bizarre Ways to Have a More Productive Workday
    Sometimes, the conventional ways of trying to boost your brainpower just don't cut it, and you need some clever, one-off tricks to smack yourself back in the groove and on your way to productivity heaven. Here are five bizarre, yet effective ways to help you have a more productive, less monotonous workday.
  • Hey, Managers: Stop Emailing Your Employees at Night
    Mobile technology was supposed to set us free from the tyranny of the 9-to-5, allowing workers to escape the office and plug in wherever they happened to be, and work when inspiration struck. Instead, studies show, improvements in technology have blurred the boundaries between work-time and personal-time, and changed managers' expectations of the managed. In short, many bosses and employers now expect workers to check their email at night, on the weekends, even on vacation. The result? Workers are getting mad, and getting less done.
  • After 'Religious Freedom' Becomes Law in Indiana, Businesses Vote With Their Dollars
    On Thursday, Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, effectively allowing businesses to refuse to serve gay customers. In the days since, some companies have responded by restricting or terminating their investments in Indiana.
  • Why You Should Socialize With Your Colleagues
    Sometimes, workplace social events feel like a chore. Management may not want to "waste" time sponsoring fun during the workday, and not all employees are thrilled about spending their free time on the weekend at the company picnic. However, that social time among staff can boost productivity and increase morale and quality of life at work. Here is why you should encourage social events at your workplace.
  • 3 Important Career Lessons from NBA Legend Steve Nash
    One of the NBA's most acclaimed and tenured players announced his retirement this past week. Nash had a respected and decorated career in the NBA, but it didn’t come without its fair share of adversity. We'll take a look at a few ways Nash's hard-earned success can be applied off the court and inspire professionals to be MVPs in their careers.
  • Even at the Top of the Corporate Ladder, Women Are Paid Less Than Men
    If a female executive retreats to her car to scream because her promotion was (again) awarded to her male colleague, does anyone hear her scream … or even care? Probably not. Unfortunately, this happens countless times a day as working women continue to get passed over, neglected, and discriminated against in their careers. What's worse is that this epidemic isn't isolated to lower-ranking women, it's consistent all the way up the corporate ladder where female executives continue to chip away at the glass ceiling.
  • A Shortage of Substitute Teachers Causes Big Problems for Schools
    Sometimes, making progress in one area leads to new problems in another. The improved unemployment rate may be causing some difficult adjustments for schools, for example, as subs move toward full-time employment in greater numbers.
  • Served in the Military? Here Are 4 Things You Need to Know About the USERRA
    The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) of 1994 is a federal statute that protects veterans and servicemembers from being discriminated against due to their military status in the civilian employment arena. This statute typically protects two groups of people: (1) reservists who have military responsibilities and a civilian job and (2) veterans who have entered or are trying to enter the civilian workforce after their military service is complete. While the law itself is long and complicated, these are four things servicemembers and veterans should be aware of regarding their rights.
  • 3 Reasons Why Recruiters 'Heart' Passive Candidates
    It's a common dilemma, really. You're gainfully employed, but you also can't help but think that there are greener pastures with another employer. However, your current job isn't that bad, so you're not really an active job seeker -- it'd just be nice to know what career options are available. If this is you, then read on to see why you are a recruiter's dream come true. Here's why.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! I Tried to Negotiate, and the Employer Pulled the Offer
    When you're evaluating a job offer, it's almost always smart to ask for more money. After all, if you don't ask, most of the time, you won't get. That said, occasionally you'll run into hiring managers who choose to see even a perfectly reasonable request as a personal affront. This week's roundup includes expert advice on dealing with that situation, plus tips on how to build your personal brand and avoid the pitfalls of crafting a college essay.
  • Negotiation Stories: 'The Best/Worst Time I Asked for a Raise'
    When PayScale compiled the Salary Negotiation Guide, less than half of the 31,000 respondents said that they had ever negotiated salary. Why don't more people ask for a raise? For 28 percent of those who declined to negotiate, it was because they felt uncomfortable asking for more money. When you read some of these stories, it will become clear why some people feel that way.
  • 3 Ways Colleges Are Wasting Your Money
    Want to get mad? If you have ever attended or plan to attend college, take a look at a Ted Scheinman's recent Pacific Standard article, entitled How Colleges Misspend Your Tuition Money. The URL, which includes the phrase "pay for decent teachers, not Dr. Phil," gives the first hint of what lies ahead. Hint: it's not a sound investment in teaching staff, but if you've talked to any underpaid, untenured adjunct faculty lately, you probably already knew that.
  • What Your Tweets and Posts Tell Recruiters Could Keep You From Getting the Job
    Would you think twice about sharing a mindless "I'm so bored" post on social media if you knew that research shows that people who do so experience higher rates of heart attacks and strokes? What's worse, research that ties social media use to emotional stability/instability is making its way into the hands of people that you probably don't want to be privy to such information: recruiters, hiring managers, and employers. Here's what you need to know about what your social media sharing is saying about you.
  • #PayChat Recap: College ROI
    What's the real value of a college degree? Understanding that many benefits of education are intangible, in an era when student loan debt is higher than ever before and post-graduation employment far from a sure thing, most prospective students want to make sure that their tuition dollars are an investment in their future. PayScale's recently released College ROI Report ranks schools and majors by the return students can expect from their investment. In today's #PayChat on Twitter, we asked readers to share their experiences.
  • Relax! Alleviate Your Anxiety Before a Job Interview
    You polished your resume and got a job interview. You researched the company. You practiced answering questions about your experiences in front of a mirror. You really want this job, and you do possess the qualifications necessary to do it. But you still can't shake that feeling of nervousness or get rid of the butterflies in your stomach. You are not alone; many of us feel anxiety before interviews, especially in today's competitive job market. Here are ways you can alleviate your anxiety and have a good interview.

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