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  • Even Red States Recognize That the Minimum Wage Is Too Low
    America's federal minimum wage is $7.25 -- not enough to pay rent in many states. The debate over whether to raise the minimum rages on, but voters in some states -- and not just blue ones -- are taking matters into their own hands.
  • How to Decline a Request for Recommendation
    How do you handle a recommendation or reference request from a person you are not comfortable recommending? While you do not want to jeopardize the chances of the person on the job market, you also don't want to endorse them when you are not sure of their credentials or qualifications. So what can you do about it?
  • 10 Signs You're Facing Job Burnout
    Did you drag yourself into the office today? Maybe it's just the normal Monday morning gear-shift -- or maybe it's a sign of a bigger problem. If it's getting harder and harder to go to work, and you're getting less done while you're there, it's time to consider whether you're dealing with job burnout, and not just normal day-to-day stress.
  • 3 Questions to Ask Before You Accept a Job
    Congratulations! After what seems like an eternity of looking for a new job, you finally have that elusive offer. While the first thing you may be inclined to do is hit "reply" and accept the job, there are a few things you should consider first (if you haven’t already).
  • 3 Tips for Work-Life Balance on the Weekend
    Want to get more out of your few precious hours off each weekend? It starts with planning ahead. Spend a few minutes strategizing now, and next weekend, you can be far away from your computer, doing anything but thinking about work.
  • Moms Stay Home When Kids Are Sick
    Why do women still make less money than men? It's not all about overt prejudice on the behalf of employers. PayScale's data show that part of the issue is that women tend to gravitate toward careers that give back -- and pay less. While socially conditioned altruism might be part of the reason for that choice, another factor also influences women's career decisions: the need for a flexible schedule. Recent research shows that women are 10 times more likely than men to stay home with sick kids.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 214,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.8 Percent
    The economy added 214,000 jobs last month, according to today's report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, slightly less than the 230,000 jobs predicted by economists. In addition, the unemployment rate declined 0.1 percent from the previous month.
  • 3 Ways Make Meetings More Efficient
    At most companies, colleagues share their calendars with each other for transparency and visibility, and to let everyone know when they're available. From the CEO to the lowliest summer intern, most of these calendars have one thing in common: they're jam-packed with meetings. Of course, not every meeting is a good one. Here's how to improve yours.
  • Don't Wait for Your Dream Job -- Create It
    If you’re looking for a new job, you’d probably prefer to have one that does more than just pay the bills -- one that utilizes your years of experiences and expertise, and yet challenges you. You know what you want, but the problem is, you’re not finding it. You may be browsing all the career sites all day long, yet not finding the perfect job of your dreams. Unfortunately, the reality is that your dream job may just not exist -- yet.
  • 5 Tips for Managing an Introvert
    Introverts sometimes get a bad rap in today's business world, portrayed alternately as antisocial types who can't work on teams or reclusive geniuses that are best used in moderation. In fact, successful teams are often a mixture of extroverts and introverts. The key to supporting your more inner-directed reports is understanding what makes them tick and how to give them the best shot at success, both for their own sake and that of the company.
  • How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You an Interview
    Cover letters, although stressful and time-consuming to write, help the candidates tremendously when they are trying to distinguish themselves from the other applicants. If you want to draw the attention of hiring managers to your unique qualifications or even explain something that’s just not possible through the resume, a good cover letter is the way to do it.
  • How to Answer, 'Why Did You Leave Your Last Job?' When You Left on Bad Terms
    Sometimes, the reason you left your last job is because it was terrible. Your boss or company really was evil, or your co-workers were impossible, or the situation was otherwise untenable. Whether you were fired or force to quit, you will someday have to explain why you left your job -- probably at the interview for your next one. Here's why you should never bad-mouth your former place of employment, and what to do instead.
  • Do You Really Need a Cover Letter?
    For many job seekers, the worst part of the job application process is creating a cover letter. In this age of LinkedIn and online applications, it might seem like this part of the traditional procedure is out-of-date and unnecessary. So do you have to write a cover letter? The answer, as expected is, "It depends." More specifically, it depends on how you are applying for a role.
  • Voters Approve Minimum Wage Increases in 2014 Midterm Election
    President Obama sparked fierce debate when he proposed raising the national minimum wage to $10.10 last year; the current national rate is $7.25. At the polls yesterday, voters expressed their strong support of this initiative, even as they cast votes for GOP candidates in the Senate and the House.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Economy Added 230,000 Jobs in October
    The private sector added 230,000 jobs last month, according to the ADP National Employment Report, exceeding analysts' estimates of 220,000 jobs added.
  • 3 Things You May Not Know About FMLA
    The FMLA is the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. It is the main federal law that employees in the United States rely on when they need an extended period of time off from their jobs for maternity leave, or extended sick leave, or in order to care for an ill family member. Even though most workers will either need this sort of leave at some point during their careers or will know someone who does, there are some things that most people just don't know about this law. Here are just a few facts that you may not have known:
  • Many Americans Would Improve Their Career Before Health or Relationships [Infographic]
    A new survey from Huffington Post reveals some surprising results about what makes Americans happy. Namely, nearly one-third of those surveyed would choose to improve their career or finances over their health or their relationships.
  • Do Not Call In Sick Using These 7 Ridiculous Excuses
    It's hard to get time off. Over the past 20 years, access to paid vacation days has declined, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, while more employers are offering sick time and other personal leave. This means that the temptation to take the occasional "mental health" day is stronger than ever before. Just remember, before you do, that lying has a way of coming back to haunt you in the end.
  • How to Attract More Recruiters to Your LinkedIn Profile
    There’s no question that if you are looking for a job, you should be leveraging LinkedIn. As the most popular social network for professionals, LinkedIn is not just a place for you to look for listings and connect with colleges, but the number one place recruiters go to head-hunt for candidates that they think might be the best fit for a job at their company -- even for jobs that haven’t been listed yet.
  • Why You Should Be Allowed to Choose Your Own Job Title
    Browsing on Craigslist for a new job recently? You may have seen ads for jobs such as "Social Media Ninja" or "Keyboard Rockstar." At first glance, you may have no idea what these jobs actually do -- are they looking for someone skilled in karate, or perhaps even with a record label?