• 'Pay Secrecy' Prohibited For Federal Contractors
    "It is a basic tenet of workplace justice that people be able to exchange information, share concerns and stand up together for their rights." That's what Labor Secretary Tom Perez had to say concerning the Obama administration's new rule, centered on the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, entitling workers to pursue fair pay claims. The main conclusion: you can now discuss, disclose, or inquire about your and your co-workers' pay — provided, of course, that you work for a federal contractor.
  • How to Avoid the Sunday Night Blues
    Do you feel a creeping sense of doom come Sunday afternoon? You're not alone. According to a international poll, 76 percent of U.S. respondents felt "really bad" Sunday Night Blues. And really, there's a lot to be bummed about: the weekend is ending and the work week is approaching (and hump day is still a long way off). No matter your job, you might feel sad that your personal time is coming to an end again, but there are ways to fight those blahs.
  • Feeling Lazy? Bask in These Stories of 4 People Who Got Paid to Do Nothing
    Earlier this year, PayScale told the story of A. K. Verma, an Indian civil servant who managed to avoid coming to work for 24 years before eventually getting fired for "willful absence of duty" in January 2015. Though his case, a byproduct of India's tough-to-penetrate labor laws, is shocking, Verma is not the only employee who has been paid to do nothing. Plenty of workers have found themselves in situations in which they are paid not to work.
  • 5 Signs That Now's the Time for Millennial Women to Shine in Their Careers
    Working women continue to be steadfast in their fight for gender equality in the workplace. And, it's paying off, especially for millennials, who now have the greatest support of any generation of women. Here are a few signs that it's time for millennial women to break the glass ceiling once and for all.
  • Workplace Lulz: When Your Career Is One Big Cat Meme
    Work can be boring, but it doesn't have to be. Each week, I scour the internet to find the most hilarious and trending work-related gems on the internet. From cats to memes and advice animals, here are the best workplace lulz of the week.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Michael Scott Syndrome – When the Incompetent Don't Know They're Incompetent
    Everyone has had this co-worker: the person who has no clue what they're doing ... and no idea that they're not the smartest guy in the room. In the worst-case scenario, the incompetent colleague is your boss, and you spend your days alternately marveling at their delusion and cursing the day you agreed to take this job in the first place. How did they get this way, and why are the incompetent often so filled with undeserved self-confidence? This week's roundup looks at this mystery, plus how to get buy-in during a big change, and how to be happier at work, starting today.
  • The 4 Highest Paying Jobs of 2015
    Money isn't everything, but being well compensated for your time and efforts never hurts either. Recently, CareerCast released their list of the highest paying jobs of 2015. Their wage data came from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and they based their ranking on other factors as well including stress, and future income potential. Let's take a look at the four highest paying jobs of 2015.
  • The Controversial Maternity Leaves of Marissa Mayer
    Yahoo's CEO Marissa Mayer plans to take limited time away after giving birth to her twins. She's a high-powered businesswoman, and she's done this before. (This is her second pregnancy, and she took just two weeks off last time.) Is she a heroine, someone we should all look up to – or is she part of the problem?
  • The NFL Cheerleader Wage Theft War
    Football's most famous fans may finally be getting a voice. After years of NFL cheerleaders enduring embarrassingly low pay and overall poor treatment, working conditions seem to be improving. As a recent New York Times article noted, "The cultural dial is turning." So, what exactly is changing, and why?
  • The 5 Five Stages of Wanting to Quit Your Job
    Making the decision to quit your job generally happens gradually, and then all at once. If you're in the midst of making up your mind, the important thing is not to let your emotions get the better of you. It starts with being aware of what's happening during the process. Here's what to expect when you're pondering a jump to bigger and better things – or even just an escape from a dream job that's turned into a nightmare.
  • The Hidden Costs of Makeup: Taxed If You Wear It and Taxed If You Don't
    The gender wage gap is an enduring problem that has attracted much attention. But lately, researchers have been taking a closer look at some other, less well-known gender disparities. A recent article in The Atlantic discussed the fact that women who choose not to wear makeup at work may lose out on promotions, salaries, and other benefits, while women who do wear makeup might reap the benefits, but lose time, money, and sleep. For women in the workplace, it seems, makeup is a mixed bag.
  • When You Are the Minority at Work
    It's the first day of work and you're meeting with your new team; while it doesn't immediately strike you at first, you realize soon enough that perhaps you are the only person of color, the only man, the only woman, or the only person of a different faith in the room. It's not an easy start, but you will be able to make it work. Here are a few ways you can avoid isolation and any preconceived biases toward you and your efforts.
  • 4 Working Moms Share the Reality of Maternity Leave in the US
    Last month, we asked working parents to share their experiences with taking parental leave in the US. The responses, which came from people in occupations as diverse as librarian and banker, showed what most of us already know: the United States has a long way to go when it comes to leave for new parents. While top tech employers like Netflix and Microsoft might dangle months or even a year of paid leave, most working parents are left cobbling together disability, vacation time, and FMLA leave – if they're lucky enough to qualify.
  • Do You Have 'Career Compulsive Disorder'?
    Raise your hand if your lunch breaks consist of sitting at your desk, scarfing down food, and pounding away on your keyboard trying to get through emails. Turns out, you're not alone. According to Gallup's Work and Education Survey findings, adults working full-time in the U.S. spend an average of 47 hours per week plugging away at their jobs, and nearly four in 10 say they work at least 50 hours per week.
  • 3 Lessons Learned From the 2015 World Championships of Public Speaking
    The organization Toastmasters International has been helping people improve their public speaking skills for years. With tried and true techniques (and through a lot of practice), Toastmasters turns nervous presenters into experienced and confident orators. The winner of this year's competition can teach us a thing or two about how to get our listeners' attention, whether it's in the weekly status report meeting or the annual company-wide conference.
  • What Everyone Needs to Know About the Seattle Teachers Strike
    This morning, Tuesday, September 15, parents and students across Seattle woke up to the news that there would be no school again today. The teachers in the city are on strike, with huge consequences for families and kids, and for the teachers themselves. But, this strike isn't just about Seattle – it's about the state of the educational system in America, and it's about the way teachers are valued and treated. Here's what you need to know.
  • How to Avoid Defaulting on Your Student Loans
    Over 67 percent of college seniors had taken out student loans as of the 2011-12 academic year, according to The National Center for Education Statistics. That same year, the student loan default rate reached 10 percent. Obviously, no one enters school planning on defaulting on their student loans – defaulting can ruin your credit, impacting everything from your ability to get a mortgage or a car loan to getting hired for your dream job. PayScale's College Salary Report shows how college choice affects ability to earn enough to pay back loans; to help students avoid common mistakes when taking out their first loans, we spoke via email with Anne Del Plato, Regional Director for U-fi Student Loans.
  • Here's Why You Have Impostor Syndrome (Even Though You Shouldn't)
    Do you feel like a fake? If so, you might be suffering from impostor syndrome, the feeling of intellectual or professional fraudulence that manifests as severe self-doubt. Even when all evidence indicates that they are competent, someone experiencing impostor syndrome can't shake the feeling that they don't know what they're doing professionally, and that soon enough someone is going to find out that they're faking their way through their job and they'll be fired.
  • Can You Have Fun at Work?
    When you think of the daily grind, you think of just that: a dull, sometimes tedious place where you clock in and clock out and can't wait to leave every day, right? Man, that's rough. But what if your workplace was fun? People who say you can't have fun at work are not only wrong, their attitude could be keeping their team from being really successful. Here's how to be the change you want to see, whether or not you're officially in charge of morale around the office.
  • Your Personality Type Might Affect Your Chances of Getting the Job
    If you've ever been asked to take a personality test as a part of a job application process, you know the strange pressure and confusion it can call up. After all, shouldn't our resume and interview tell our prospective employers everything they need to know about whether or not we're right for the position? These tests make us try to figure out which qualities (and which answers) the hiring team is looking for – and they can leave us wondering if we've hit the mark. Here are a few things you should know about personality tests and the hiring process.