• When Kids Learn About the Gender Pay Gap, We All Learn Something From Them
    Kids help us take a fresh look at the world around us. Sometimes, we can become so accustomed to our environment and our circumstances that we have a hard time actually seeing things the way they are. Children help with that; kids often have a way of putting things that sheds fresh light on a situation we take for granted – for example, the gender pay gap. Recently, the folks at Expert Market, a company that helps businesses locate services and equipment, deviated from their usual approach to gender pay gap research and instead turned their focus on a group of 5- to 7-year-olds. How these kids reacted to learning about the gender pay gap for the first time will make you rethink the things you already "know." Let's take a closer look.
  • 5 Reasons Why Mother Knows Best When It Comes to Your Career
    Wouldn't it be nice if life came with a manual? You wouldn't have to worry about whether you're doing something right or wrong, because your handy manual would navigate you seamlessly through the ins and outs of your life and career. Unfortunately, life doesn't come with a manual, but it does, typically, come with a mother – and that's pretty much the same thing. Here are five reasons why mother knows best when it comes to your career.
  • Want to Minimize the Financial Hit of Having Kids? Have Them After Age 30
    Is there a wage penalty for motherhood? Research suggests so, showing that having a child has a negative impact on women's earnings, while fatherhood offers a wage bonus for men. For each child a woman has, her wages decrease by about 4 percent, whereas a man's wages rise by about 6 percent when he becomes a dad, perhaps because employers start to see these earners differently once they've become fathers.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Salary Negotiation Strategies for Working Moms
    Even when women don't prioritize family over work, they pay a salary penalty for marrying and having kids. In fact, PayScale's report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap, shows that only childless, single men and women in the same jobs have a 0 percent gender pay gap. When women do put home responsibilities before work, they're paid increasingly less than men – and that's without taking significant time out of their careers to raise a family. When moms leave work, and then return, they face an uphill battle to get the pay they deserve. This week's roundup looks at salary negotiation techniques for those moms, as well as a checklist for buffing up your LinkedIn profile, and strategies to avoid burnout before it strikes.
  • 5 Ways to Avoid Civil War in the Office
    Like it or not, we'll be involved in some sort of argument or disagreement with our colleagues over the course of our career. It's a given that views on what's best for our companies and customers will vary from time to time. Even superheroes aren't immune to a difference of opinion every now and then; we're all waiting anxiously to see how Captain America, Iron Man, and the rest of The Avengers resolve their differences in what's likely to be the summer’s first blockbuster, Captain America: Civil War.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 160,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Steady at 5 Percent
    Hiring slowed in April, this morning's report from the Labor Department shows. Total nonfarm employment increased by 160,000 jobs, despite economists' earlier predictions that the report would reflect the addition of around 200,000 jobs to public- and private-sector payrolls. Unemployment remained at 5 percent.
  • What Good Is Job Growth If You Can't Earn a Living Wage?
    Tomorrow's job report from the Labor Department is expected to reflect approximately 200,000 jobs added in April, and an unemployment rate holding steady at 5 percent. However, if you take a closer look at the data, a less rosy picture of the economy emerges. A disproportionate number of those jobs being added are in fact low-wage jobs. Besides the obvious fact that low-wage jobs don't afford a very cushy life for workers, very few offer health benefits, sick pay/leave, PTO, or retirement plans.
  • Flexible Side Gigs Are Great for Extra Cash, Not So Much for Career Growth
    Looking at the numbers, it appears that the economy is recovering nicely from the Great Recession. Unemployment is at 5 percent and the GDP is up, but that doesn't necessarily mean all is peachy-keen in America's job market. In fact, PayScale's Real Wage Index indicates that, despite the decreased unemployment rate, wages have actually fallen 6.5 percent since 2006 (when inflation is factored in). This reality has forced many professionals (employed and unemployed) to turn to flexible side gigs to make some extra cash. However, as it turns out, this "gig economy" could be more detrimental than beneficial to workers. Here's why.
  • 4 Basic Excel Tricks You Should Definitely Know
    If you're a millennial like me, you might recall learning all the tricks of the beast that is Microsoft Excel back in your high school days, or even college. But let's be real for a quick minute. A lot of time has passed, and you probably don't remember all the time-saving tricks your teachers so graciously showed you back in the day. Knowing how to use Excel efficiently can streamline your work and make you more productive. So if your memory is fuzzy, take note of these easy and super basic Excel tricks that will make you look smarter at work and save you a lot of time.
  • Coders Are Actually Getting Agents Now
    With the NFL draft behind us, it may be tempting for recent college grads to pine for what could have been in a career as a pro athlete: the salary is amazing, for one thing, and you get to live out a life-long dream as a star of American culture. But with the competitive nature of such a job, there's a lot at work behind the scenes that we probably don't understand. Now, for some in Silicon Valley, the job hunt is starting to look a little more like the path of a pro athlete.
  • 5 Jobs That Pay 80k+ Per Year Without a College Degree
    We all know that going to college increases the chance that you will eventually have a high-paying career. But attending college is an investment. It costs both time and money, and it isn't necessarily the best path for everyone. In any case, there are still people out there who have great, high-paying jobs who didn't have to attend college. Let's check them out with commentary from a recent AskReddit.
  • Detroit Teachers Return to School Today Following Sickout
    The right to public education might not be explicitly guaranteed under the Constitution, but equal access is covered under the 14th Amendment. What does this mean, in reality? Sometimes, not much. The quality of public education varies a lot from school district to district and even from school to school. Our schools do not deliver on the promise of public education – and therefore equal opportunity – for all students. Take, for instance, the persistent problems in the Detroit public school system, which this week inspired teachers to launch a sickout after the district announced it would run out of money to pay them in June.
  • #StarWarsDay: How to Use the Force to Boost Your Career
    "May the Fourth be with you." If you have any Star Wars fans in your life – and if you haven't, please pardon the rest of us as we electronically sidle away from you – you've probably already heard this a couple-hundred times this morning, counting online mentions. So you already know that today, May 4th, is a holy day for Star Wars fans and pun lovers everywhere. But what you probably don't know is that today is also an excellent day to think about what's missing in your career, and to set about fixing it. Forget your career bible of choice – what you need is The Force.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 156,000 Jobs in April
    Private-sector job growth slowed in April, according to this month's report from payroll processor ADP, which showed private payrolls adding 156,000 jobs last month. Prior to this morning's report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting gains ranging from 116,000 to 225,000, with an average prediction of 196,000. The report shows the weakest job gains in three years.
  • French Office Worker Takes Former Employer to Court for Boring Him at Work
    Some people don't know how lucky they have it. Take, for example, the case of Frédéric Desnard, the former manager who's bringing his ex-employer, Interparfums, before an employment tribunal, claiming "bore out" – similar to burnout, "but less interesting," as The Guardian puts it. Terminated by the perfume company a year and a half ago, Desnard is now asking for over $400,000 in damages.
  • 5 Ways to Write a Horrible LinkedIn Recommendation
    Good LinkedIn recommendations do more than just tell prospective hiring managers and recruiters that you know your stuff – they might help those folks find your profile in the first place, by boosting your results in LinkedIn's search rankings. Bad LinkedIn recommendations, on the other hand, are worse than nothing at all. Think about it like you would any reference during a job interview process: if the person you've chosen to recommend you for a job doesn't have much good stuff to say about you, what does that mean about your skills and abilities?
  • The 5 Worst States for Teachers
    Whether you're new to the profession, or a master veteran to the science/art, you probably know that teaching is a very difficult job. The curriculum, rules and regulations, and "best practices" are ever-changing so you can never get too comfortable. The money isn't great – to say the least. Not to mention that, on any given day, the work itself is seemingly endless, very difficult, and largely underappreciated (and/or misunderstood) by society at large.
  • The 5 Best States for Teachers
    Teaching is difficult work. However, some factors (such as compensation and teacher/student ratio) can make a big difference. Every year, WalletHub examines all 50 states plus the District of Columbia using 13 metrics in order to determine the best and worst states for teachers.
  • 3 Reasons Why It's Tough to Teach in West Virginia (and These Other States)
    There are a lot of wonderful things about being a teacher, but it's a really difficult job, too. It's a profession that's immensely rewarding and immeasurably challenging all at once, each and every day. It's a job that's always changing – new students, new culture, new curriculum. The pay is relatively low, when measured against what other comparably trained professionals earn, and the hours are very long. (Yes, even when you consider the summer, despite what you might have heard.)
  • 4 Things Teachers Really Want for Teacher Appreciation Week
    If you don't work in education, you might not be aware that this week, May 1st through 7th, is Teacher Appreciation Week and Tuesday, May 3rd, is Teacher Appreciation Day. But, as much as teachers love coffee mugs and chocolate, there are a few other things that they might appreciate being given even more.

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