• Want to Make a Good First Impression? Choose Your Clothing Carefully
    Our choice of clothing causes others to make assumptions -- sometimes correct, sometimes incorrect -- about who we are. If you want to make the best first impression on a job interview or at work, let your clothing help, not hinder you.
  • Want to Make a Good First Impression? Here's What to Do
    Going on a job interview or meeting with a new client, you want to put your best foot forward and make this person want to work with you. Understand how different behaviors affect first impressions, and use them to your advantage.
  • Workplace Fun Increases Productivity
    There's evidence that people who have fun at work are happier, healthier, motivated, and more productive than their stressed-out counterparts. Who'da thunk it?
  • Do Abusive Bosses Cause Cheating Workers?
    Whatever you do for a living, whether it's crunch numbers or play ball, working under an abusive leader derails morale. There is some evidence that when it gets bad enough, workers cheat and even break the law.
  • Should Women Wear Red to Work?
    Colors have subtle and often subconscious effects on our perceptions and behaviors. Red is sometimes associated with anger, and is a bold, bright color to which men and women often respond differently. Should you see red in your work clothing?
  • Higher Minimum Wage Correlates With Job Growth
    One of the biggest arguments against raising the minimum wage has been a pay hike's potential impact on job growth. Many business groups argue that employers won't be able to hire more people if they can't offer low wages. However, recent data from the Department of Labor shows that this might not be the case. Twelve of the 13 states that raised their minimum wage since the beginning of the year have experienced more job growth than lower-wage states.
  • When the Passive-Aggressive Co-worker Is You
    Many of us are not comfortable with confrontation. That's a problem in the workplace, where communication is key. Fail to deal with conflict honestly, and you might wind up sabotaging a project ... or even your whole career. Here's how to recognize these tendencies in yourself and deal with them.
  • Imposter Syndrome: When You Feel Like a Fake
    Competent, capable people who have worked hard to get where they are sometimes suffer from "imposter syndrome." This normal phenomena can have disastrous results if you don't recognize it for what it is, and learn how to deal with it. Don't let imposter syndrome hold you back.
  • When Your Boss Won't Stop Questioning Your Every Move
    Some bosses can't stop asking questions. "Why are you doing that? Will this really work? Are you sure? Why do you think so?" A barrage of this type of questioning makes many people feel that their bosses do not trust them. It's like taking care of a curious toddler, but it's not cute when it's your boss. Here's how to handle the situation.
  • U.S. Schools Are Failing Students in the Global Economy

    The good news is that the worldwide workforce is gaining in vital skill sets and abilities. The bad news is that United States workers are lagging behind the rest of the world. And the gap is growing, which is a dangerous trend for the U.S.A.

  • Sexy Social Media Photos Make You Look Incompetent
    By now, you probably know that posting the wrong material on social media can have severe consequences for your career. But recent research indicates that posting revealing photos can backfire in one unexpected way: Your peers may see you as less competent.
  • Switching Companies May Earn You More Money

    Loyalty to one employer is no longer the best strategy for most workers, at least in terms of earnings. People who "job hop" and switch companies end up earning higher salaries than those who stick around.

  • Obama Wants Paid Maternity Leave for Working Families
    At the White House Summit on Working Families last month, President Barack Obama said that working families in this country should have paid maternity leave.
  • America Still Lags Behind the World in Maternity Leave
    According to the World Policy Forum, the United States of America, Suriname, and Papua New Guinea have something in common: they are the only nations that do not require employers to provide paid maternity leave.
  • The Best and Worst States to Be a Working Mother
    Some states offer new parents and families additional protections in the workplace, on top of federal protections. Many, however, do not. How does your state stack up?
  • How You Can Create an Awesome Company Culture
    Company culture often comes from the top and trickles down. However, employees also contribute to the feel of the work environment. If your company culture could use some improvement, here are a few ways you may help effect change.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 288,000 Jobs Added
    Any way you look at it, June was a great month for job growth and employment in various industries. Economists are hopeful that this trend will continue.
  • Parents Value Education But Won't Pay for College
    More parents are requiring their children to either take out loans or pay for their college educations out of pocket.
  • How to Be an Effective Leader: Praise vs. Feedback
    Many of us have the opportunity to lead in our work lives. We may have an assistant who works with us, or be part of a team. Teams may have appointed leaders or operate collaboratively, but effective leadership and communication skills are always useful. Learn the difference between praise and feedback to become an effective leader.
  • 3 Massive Companies That Are Incredibly Good To Their Employees
    We may think of large companies as being less personal to work for. When corporate headquarters are in another state, or you never meet the people in charge of making policy, you may feel like just another gear in the machine. These three giant companies, however, have not forgotten how vital the workers are and treat them well.