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  • Your Boss Wants You to Be Happy at Work (and That's Bad News)
    The sound you hear is your boss tossing his computer out the window after reading that headline. After all, isn't working for people who care about their employees' feelings a good thing? Before you accuse anyone of being an ingrate, rest assured: individual bosses who care are still a positive. However, as the recently published book The Happiness Industry suggests, the science of "happiness at work" has a dark side, and less to do with your emotional health than your ability to produce, produce, produce.
  • Queen Bee Syndrome Is Not a Thing
    Women, amirite? When they're not weeping or scheming, they're tearing each other down at work. Or, at least, that's how the theory goes. It's called Queen Bee Syndrome, and it's occupied a place in workplace lore for as long as women have been represented in the labor force. There's just one problem. A recent study shows that it's probably not true.
  • Oregon to Employers: No, You Can't Make Workers Have a Facebook Account
    Technology moves faster than law. As a result, the era of social media has been a tricky one for workers' rights. Various state and federal courts have settled questions about whether employers can ask their employees for access to their accounts and whether complaining about work on social networks counts as collective bargaining. The latest frontier in social media-related employment law: mandating that workers maintain social media accounts in the first place.
  • Career Success Guide: How to Stay Employed (Even When You're Unemployed)
    Whether you're just starting your career, or have been working for years, one thing is certain: it's harder to find a job when you don't have one. That's helpful to know if you're considering quitting a job without having another one lined up, but if you're a recent grad, newly laid-off, or just plain between gigs, well, there's not much you can do, right? Not so fast.
  • Virgin Might Bring Its Year-Long Parental Leave to the US
    Last week, Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson announced that employees of Virgin Management in London and Geneva will receive a year of maternity or paternity leave, at full pay, to be shared between parents. Shortly after, a Virgin spokesperson confirmed to ABC News that the company was considering extending the policy to management in the U.S., as well, saying that they were "in the process of working hard on making this happen in the U.S., and hope to have an update in the coming months."
  • 5 Ways to Get Stuff Done When Literally Everyone Is On Vacation
    Ah, summer, season of endless, lazy days by the pool or at the park, decompressing from work and enjoying life ... unless, that is, you're the poor sucker that's stuck back at the office, while every teammate, client, and vendor is away having a good time. Before you use these fruitless hours to write your modern Cinderella story (and you're welcome, by the idea, for the idea) take heart. You can still get your job done, with a little planning and a lot of creativity.
  • Why Every Job Seeker Should Write Their Autobiography
    Thanks to social media, when most of hear "biography," we think of Twitter mini-bios – the kind that contain a bunch of one-word descriptors, punctuated by periods, and are limited to 160 characters. But according to Aliza Licht, author of Leave Your Mark: Land Your Dream Job. Kill It in Your Career. Rock Social Media, we might want to start thinking bigger, especially if we're not getting job offers.
  • 3 Totally Painless Networking Tips for People Who Hate Networking
    Even if you're the shyest or most introverted person in the world, you're probably already networking, without even knowing it. That's because "networking" is a terrible word for a thing most of us do anyway: build relationships. The goal is to maximize what you're already doing, plus look for additional opportunities that fit with your personality and lifestyle – in other words, to network painlessly, in a way that will build your career and not drive you crazy.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Quiz – Are You Living Up to Your Full Potential?
    When we were in school, guidance counselors checked in with us to see how we were progressing. As adults, well, let's just say we could go a long time without thinking about whether we're still headed in the right direction. This week's roundup looks at a simple quiz to help workers be their own guidance counselors. Plus: how to kill collaboration, not that you'd want to, and how to work with those co-workers you wish would find another job.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Find Your Own Personal 'Board of Directors'
    One of the toughest parts of transitioning from being a full-time student to a working professional is the lack of framework. All of a sudden, there are no tests, no grades, no clearly defined projects with a beginning, middle, and end. Success is harder to define, and while the sky's the limit, the goal posts can seem to toward the horizon with every step you take. The good news? While your working hours belong to the company, your career belongs only to you.
  • 5 Tricky Ways to Shorten Meetings
    Meetings are a mystery. Everyone claims to hate them, and yet they proliferate on our calendars like Tribbles on Star Trek. The explanations for why that happens are many and varied, including different goals for management and staff, ineffective communication techniques, and just plain old ego. (If you've ever had a boss who loved to hear himself talk, you're familiar with this issue.) Here's how to keep meetings short and get back your time.
  • Early Career Success Guide: Don't Forget About the Soft Skills
    Hard skills will help you get the job, but if you want to keep it (and excel) you need soft skills as well. Knowing how to communicate effectively, rebound from a setback, and express commitment to your work will impress the boss, your co-workers, and your company's clients – all of which will make it easier to show off what you can do.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Get Along With the Boss
    Chances are, by the time you start your first "real" job, you've had bosses before. But what was appropriate at the ice cream stand or landscaping gig might not be OK in your new office environment. Even if you've had tons of internships and lots of practice dealing with corporate culture, expect a learning curve when you begin your first professional job. Every company and manager is different. If you want to be a success, you'll need to learn how to adapt and communicate with your particular boss.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Talk to Your College Grad About Getting a Job
    What's the difference between guiding and nagging? If you're a parent, the answer probably is, "Depends on the day." There are few times more challenging to parents of grownup kids than the period after graduation, when their newly minted grads head into an unknown future (and possibly back to their childhood bedroom). The challenge, of course, from a parent's perspective, is how to encourage them in their budding career, without driving them nuts. This week, we look at Kelsey Manning's advice for parents of recent grads. Plus: tips for brand-new Twitter users, and how to answer the dreaded question, "Don't you think you're overqualified?"
  • BLS Jobs Report: 280,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.5 Percent
    This morning's Employment Situation Summary from the labor department exceeded economists' predictions and showed an increase in average hourly earnings as well. The economy added 280,000 jobs last month, more than the 225,000 predicted by economists, and the unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 5.5 percent (compared with 5.4 percent for the previous month). In addition, March and April's reports were revised upward by a combined 32,000 jobs.
  • Maybe Don't Wait for the Weekend to Apply for Jobs
    One of the challenges of looking for a job when you have a job is finding time to apply, without taking the risks of applying on the company time. For that reason, some job seekers dedicate their weekends to job searching, sending off their cover letters, CVs, and cold inquiries on Saturday and Sunday. There's just one problem: a recent study shows that by waiting until no one's in the office, you might be consigning your resume to a black hole.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Use Data to Get Your Dream Job
    A long time ago, when I was a newly minted job seeker, a school friend and I sat down to talk about our job prospects – and how much we thought we should be paid. "I'm figuring on $60,000 a year to start," she said. When I asked how she came to that number, she replied, "Well, that's about how much I think I need to pay off my loans and live in the manner to which I'd like to become accustomed." Needless to say, her first administrative assistant job, way back in the year (intentional mumbling to obscure my age), did not come through the way she'd hoped, in terms of pay.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 201,000 Jobs in May
    After five months of declining jobs numbers, this morning's ADP National Employment Report showed gains of 201,000 jobs – almost exactly as economists predicted ahead of the release. The previous month's report was revised downward slightly, to 165,000 jobs.
  • Seriously, Do Not Lie About Your Salary as a Negotiation Tactic
    While the best salary negotiation advice is to try not to divulge your salary history, or to push the hiring manager to state a range, many won't play along. That's because they know that the person who names a number first is at a disadvantage – and they'd prefer to be "Not It." This is supremely frustrating to a job seeker. You could be forgiven for thinking that the best thing to do would be to stretch the numbers a bit, when asked to name your most recent salary.
  • All Stay-at-Home Parents Should Get a 'Wife Bonus'
    Someday, Dorothy will pull back the curtain on the internet and we'll discover not a man pulling levers, but the greatest communication tool of the 21st century, entirely powered by human outrage. Look no further than the recent flap over social researcher Wednesday Martin's forthcoming book Primates of Park Avenue, which examines the phenomenon of the "glam SAHM" – real Real Housewives who probably don't change a lot of diapers, but spend their time managing the careers of the future one percent. The inspiration for the furor? Like their financier husbands, these ladies apparently get a cash bonus for their efforts.