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  • When It Comes to Job Skills, American Millennials Are in a Race to the Bottom
    The youngest workers, the ones who grew up alongside the latest and greatest technologies, have always been assumed to be more skilled in their use. It's probably been like this since the invention of the typewriter, but it's increasingly true now, in an era when most office jobs rely on digital technologies that adapt seemingly by the minute. In addition, today's young workers are more educated than ever before, boasting more years of education than any previous generation. There's just one problem: recent research shows that Gen Y workers in the U.S. are anything but highly skilled.
  • What a Good Boss Does That Others Don't
    Bad managers are the No. 1 reason workers leave their jobs, so the importance of having (and being) and good boss can't be overstated. The problem, of course, is that it's difficult to arrive at a consensus of what this means. What is it, exactly, that good managers do and bad managers don't?
  • College ROI Report: Where to Go to School If You Love to Party (or Want to Do Anything But)
    If you're in the process of choosing a college, you're probably neck-deep in facts and figures. While it's essential to consider the data when making your choice, if you ignore everything but earning potential and graduation rates, you might wind up picking a school that looks great on paper, but is the worst possible place for you, the individual, to build your academic career. The best school for you is the one that takes all your needs into account, including career path, choice of major, and preferred campus culture. With this in mind, PayScale's College ROI report offers lists of the best schools for sports fans, liberal arts majors, future businesspeople, and much more. For example, if you're interested in a party school or need a place that keeps it clean, the following schools might be for you.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Time Management Lies, Crazy Interview Questions, and What Workers Want More Than Free Food
    If you've ever interviewed at a tech company -- or any startup -- you've probably had a hiring manager try to sell you on the value of fun perks like free food, in-office foosball, and other swag and snacks. In reality, though, these extras are worth much less than other considerations. For example, dealing with a bad boss isn't worth all the cereal General Mills will ever produce.
  • Vodafone Offers 16-Week Maternity Leave, Full Pay for Part-Time Work After
    Last week, Vodafone Group announced that it will offer 16 weeks of paid maternity leave to employees at all 30 of its companies around the world by the end of the year. In addition, returning mothers will be offered a flexible work schedule after their leave is over: for six months, they will be allowed to work 30 hours a week, while retaining their full-time salary.
  • College ROI Report: Will You Earn Enough to Pay Off Your Debt?
    Student loan debt is on the rise. In 2011, 51 percent of first-time, full-time college students had took out student loans, according to the National Center of Education Statistics, an 11 percent increase from 10 years prior. The average size of those loans also increased by 36 percent. During the same period, the country experienced one of the worst recessions in its history, offering college students fewer resources to draw on, in order to offset loans, and dimmer prospects of high-earning employment after graduation. In the latest edition of the College ROI report, PayScale examines which colleges and universities offer the best return and lowest debt load for prospective students.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup:  Kickstart Your Workday, Career Lessons at Age 23, and Why Cover Letters Still Exist
    How do you start your workday? If you, like many of us, are generally a little bit late, it could be by grabbing the caffeinated beverage of your choice and hurriedly scanning your inbox. But maybe it's time for a reboot.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 295,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Falls to 5.5 Percent
    Economists predicted gains of 240,000 jobs for February, but this morning's release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics beat expectations with 295,000 jobs added, and an unemployment rate that declined 0.2 points to 5.5 percent -- the lowest in six and a half years.
  • PayScale's 2015 College ROI Report: Will Your Degree Pay Off?
    Student loan debt has more than quadrupled over the past 20 years, according to Pew Research Center. In 2012, the average loan total was $29,400, and seven out of 10 students graduated with debt. No wonder that many prospective students (and their parents) consider the return on their college investment before choosing a school or program. PayScale's 2015 College ROI Report ranks the schools and majors whose graduates receive a high rate of return from attending -- in other words, they earned back their tuition and fees, and then some, and then went on to earn much higher salaries than they would have without their degree.
  • Vince Vaughn's Stock Photos Perfectly Capture the Excitement of Modern Corporate Life
    If you've ever read a single blog post about career development, job searching, or any other aspect of working for a living, you've seen them: corporate-themed stock photos. Most feature models who are so blandly inoffensive, it's hard to picture them ever gunning for a promotion or crying in a bathroom. But until now, none of them have featured Hollywood actors. (Well. Hardly any of them, anyway.)
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 212,000 Jobs in February
    Private payrolls added 212,000 jobs last month, according to this morning's ADP National Employment Report. That's slightly fewer jobs than the 220,000 predicted by economists and the slowest growth in the past six months.
  • PayScale at SXSW: Economic Mobility Through Education, and What Employers Really Want From Grads
    SXSWedu began as a regional event focusing on K-12 education in Texas, but since its inception in 2011, it has evolved into an international conference on what makes education work for students and educators. SXSWedu Conference & Festival now offers 300 sessions and workshops, 700 speakers, and an Education Expo. This year, PayScale is participating in two panel discussions: Economic Mobility Through Education, and What Employers Want Most and Get Least from Grads.
  • Forbes: Today's Billionaires Are Younger, 'Poorer,' More Numerous
    Bill Gates topped Forbes' 2015 billionaires list, and the other top names will look equally familiar, including Carlos Slim Helu (No. 2) and Warren Buffett (up to No. 3 this year, and the biggest gainer on the list). Elsewhere, though, the list contained plenty of shakeups and new faces.
  • 10 Career Lessons From #ReasonYouWereFiredInTwoWords
    The last thing you should do, if you get fired, is tweet about it -- especially in the heat of the moment, when you're embarrassed and trying to gather up the tattered bits of your dignity. If you've got a severance package, blabbing could even jeopardize it. No matter what, you want to look professional. No one wants to hire the person who complained about their former employer on social media, even if that employer really deserved it.
  • Does Your Face Reveal Your Job?
    If you're a leader in business, sports, or the military, people might be able to tell just by looking at your face, according to recent research published in The Leadership Quarterly. A team led by Christopher Y. Olivola of the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon found that participants could identify occupations for leaders "with above-chance accuracy."
  • No One Listens to Chicken Little
    Want to ensure that none of your co-workers listen to a word you say? Be the office Chicken Little. While cautious skepticism definitely has its place in any team environment, consistently negative people are unlikely to be heard -- even if they have something important to say.
  • 5 Tricks to Calm Down Before a Big Job Interview
    It's a cruel fact of the job search process: just when you need to have your wits about you, the pressure of acing the job interview makes it hard to project calm professionalism. If only you could be as relaxed before the interview as you inevitably will be after -- when all you have to do is think about how much better you'd be, if you could just do everything over again.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Everything Is a Crisis, Flat Wages, and Sinister Office Remodeling
    The past couple of years have been rough on everyone. If you managed to make it through the post-recession landscape without getting laid off yourself, chances are, you know someone who wasn't so lucky. Small wonder, then, that many workers are a bit anxious. This week's roundup looks at how to handle work anxiety and how to tell if layoff fears are justified. Plus: an explanation of why the economy is improving, but your paycheck isn't.
  • 5 Easy Ways to Be Happier at Work
    In a perfect world, we'd be able to walk away from less-than-awesome jobs, preferably after making a well-scripted scene that somehow has no lasting repercussions for our professional futures. In real life, however, being able to ditch an unwanted job at a moment's notice is as rare as a meet-cute on public transit with the love of your life. It's the stuff of romantic comedies, in other words. If you want to improve your life immediately, your best bet isn't ditching your job; it's learning how to make your life better while you sneakily make long-term plans to secure new employment.
  • These 5 Jobs Have the Worst Gender Wage Gap
    Women make about 80 percent of what men earn, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is a big improvement over 30 years ago, when the number was 65.7 percent, but far from pay equity. PayScale's research on the gender wage gap shows that some of the continued disparity between male and female pay is due to occupational "choice," i.e. women opting for lower-paying jobs that give back and allow more flexibility. But lower pay for women can't entirely be explained by job type. In fact, some of the highest-paying industries also feature the largest pay gaps.