• #MondayMotivation: 5 Ways to Cope With Daylight Saving Time
    Did you feel a little jetlagged this morning? It's not all in your head – or at least, you didn't make it up. The effects of Daylight Saving Time on health and well-being are well-documented, including everything from general sleepiness to an elevated risk for heart attack and stroke. (Fortunately, those more serious risks dissipate a few days after the change.) So, if you're feeling a little behind at work today, the clock might be to blame. But, because your boss probably won't buy that excuse for long, you'll need to catch up as soon as possible. Here's how.
  • 10 Quotes From Scientists to Inspire You on Pi Day
    Pi Day has been with us since at least 1988, when physicist Larry Shaw first led a parade of fruit-pie eating staffers at the San Francisco Exploratorium. It's hard to believe, though, that some math-minded folks hadn't noticed earlier the connection between today's date – 3.14, if noted in the American style, month-first – and the first digits of pi, 3.14, the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter. Regardless of how long you've been celebrating, today's a great day to eat pie, wish Albert Einstein a happy birthday, or generally get inspired by math and science.
  • Unconscious Bias Is Happening Where You Least Expect It: At Your Workplace
    Recently, PayScale released data that show the gap between men and women's perceptions of equal opportunity at work. Based on 140,000 individual responses to the PayScale Salary Survey, the report showed that 75 percent of men say there's equal opportunity for men and women in their workplace – but only 51 percent of women say the same. The perception gap is even worse at tech companies, with 80 percent of men, but only 44 percent of women, saying that women have equal opportunities at their employer.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What to Ask Instead of 'What Do You Do?'
    What's the worst part about networking? All the horrifyingly dull questions you have to ask and answer, in order to establish new relationships with your fellow humans. But, there's no law that says we have to stick to the same old, same old. Mixing things up might actually get some better answers, build stronger connections, and bore everyone a lot less. In this week's roundup, we look at 27 questions to ask instead of "What do you do?," plus the housekeeping questions you must ask at your next job interview, and the best ways to get motivated when you're feeling uninspired.
  • How College Rankings Have Changed
    How do college rankings help students choose a school? Earlier this week, at SXSWedu, panelists from PayScale, The Princeton Review, Money magazine, and Cornell examined college rankings, how they've evolved over the years, and what that means for the prospective students (and parents) who depend on them to make decisions about which schools to target during the application process.
  • Watch Out for This New Work-From-Home Scam: The Online Job Interview
    Telecommuting is on the rise, with 37 percent of workers in 2015 saying they'd worked from home at some point, according to Gallup, and one in 11 workers reporting that they telecommute on most work days. But, finding legitimate work-from-home jobs can be a challenge, especially when scammers are coming out with new and more genuine-sounding frauds all the time. Take, for example, this new work-from-home scam, dubbed the "Online Interview With a 'Real' Company" scam by FlexJobs, a fee-based flexible-job search site that vets its listings to avoid scams.
  • 5 Things You Can Do to Close the Gender Pay Gap, Starting Today
    Today is International Women's Day, a celebration of the struggle for women's rights that has been with us in one form or another since 1909. Nowadays, the U.N. designates themes for International Women's Day, such as "Women Uniting for Peace" (2000) and "Equal Rights, Equal Opportunities: Progress for All" (2010). Today's theme is "Planet 50-50 by 2030: Step It Up for Gender Equality." The UN's agenda specifies goals including ensuring access to free, quality primary and secondary education, and ending violence and discrimination against women and girls. It's a tall order, and one that will take concerted effort by the international community to achieve. But, there is something you can do right now to help reach the goal of equality by 2030: help end the gender pay gap in your workplace and home.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: The Evil HR Lady Explains, 'Why I Threw Out Your Resume'
    If you've been interviewing for a while, and not getting anywhere – not even to the first phone screen – the problem might be that your resume isn't making the first cut. In this week's roundup, we look at advice on how to fix that, plus a better way to say "I'm passionate" in a job market full of passionate job seekers, and the seven critical skills you're probably leaving off your resume.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 242,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Steady at 4.9 Percent
    This morning's report from the Labor Department blew away analysts' expectations. Prior to the release of the monthly Employment Situation Summary, economists polled by Reuters were calling for the addition of 190,000 jobs to private payrolls. Instead, the report showed 242,000 jobs added, and an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent.
  • Would 'Period Leave' Help or Hurt Your Career?
    Sometimes it really feels like European companies are just showing off. In a time when American workers are lucky to get a few days of paid sick leave, one employer in the U.K. is offering a "period policy" that allows female workers to stay home during menstruation – without using up sick days. The idea is to improve productivity by "synchronizing work with the natural cycles of the body," says Bex Baxter, director of Coexist, the Bristol-based company.
  • There Are 16 Fewer Billionaires in the World in 2016
    Every year, Forbes releases its updated list of the world's billionaires. Some things tend to remain pretty consistent from year to year: Bill Gates is usually No. 1, or close to it; the U.S. has more billionaires than any other single country; new billionaires are often tech entrepreneurs or investors. What's different about this year? Well, for the first time since the recession, the number of billionaires in the world declined, from 1,826 in 2015 to 1,810 in 2016.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 214,000 Jobs in February
    Prior to the release of the monthly ADP National Employment Report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting the addition of 190,000 jobs to private payrolls. This morning's report beat expectations, reflecting 214,000 jobs added.
  • #MondayMotivation: The 3 Strangest Ways to Trick Yourself Into Being Productive
    Leap Day, Schmeap Day – if you get an extra 24 hours, but it's a Monday, it barely counts. If you're having trouble using this "extra day" for anything other than complaining about how much you have to do and how little you want to do it, good news: there are plenty of oddball methods of forcing yourself to get stuff done. We're not talking to-do lists and work sprints, here. These motivation tricks are different enough to throw you off-balance and into productivity.
  • Hollywood Is 'Sorority-Racist': Chris Rock Explains Unconscious Bias on Oscars Night

    Last night, during his opening monologue for the 88th Academy Awards, host Chris Rock gave perhaps the best explanation to date of unconscious bias and how it affects the careers of black actors. Hollywood, he said, isn't "burning-cross racist" or "fetch-me-some-lemonade racist." It's "sorority-racist."

    "Is Hollywood racist?" he asked. "You're damn right. Hollywood is racist, but it ain't that racist that you've grown accustomed to. Hollywood is sorority-racist. It's like, 'We like you, Rhonda, but you're not a Kappa.'"

  • Early Jobs of Presidential Candidates: Exotic Bird Cage Assembler, Babysitter, and More
    Barack Obama once scooped ice cream at Baskin-Robbins. Gerald Ford was a "darned good" park ranger, in the words of his former supervisor. Ronald Reagan was an actor, and before that, a lifeguard who saved 77 lives over the course of seven summers. Early jobs teach us a lot, from work ethic and perseverance to budgeting and the value of education. Take a look at PayScale's Presidential First Jobs Report, and you'll see how the current crop of presidential candidates' early jobs prepared them for a run at the White House.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Update Your LinkedIn Profile (Without Tipping Off the Boss)
    Keeping a job search secret is more complicated these days than not getting busted looking at a job search site on the company time. Part of the problem is that personal brand is so important for job seekers; to show hiring managers and recruiters what you have to offer, you have to keep on top of your social media presence. Of course, nothing tells an employer that you're looking like a freshly updated LinkedIn. So how can you keep your profiles fresh, without making things awkward with your current boss? This week's roundup looks at ways to manage that, plus how to handle rejection during a job search and how to deal with arguably the worst thing about working as a team.
  • 'Presenteeism' Is Not Your Fault: Why Workers Come to Work Sick
    "If you're sick, stay home." You've heard that from experts ranging from the CDC, to WebMD, to your own mother. If you're lucky, you might even hear it from your boss. Still, many come to work sick, including over half of food service workers. The phenomenon is called "presenteeism," and researchers estimate that it costs employers $150 billion a year – more than either absenteeism or disability. So why do people go to work when they're sick? The reason why is pretty obvious: American workers feel they can't take time off, and a lot of the time, they're right.
  • IT, Healthcare the Top Fields for Telecommuting Jobs, According to FlexJobs
    If you want to work from home, you might have an easier time finding a telecommuting gig if you're in healthcare or computer/IT. Those two industries dominated FlexJobs' list, The Top 100 Companies With Work-From-Home Jobs, which ranks the companies that offered the most work-from-home opportunities on the site in the past year. Forty percent of the companies included were in one of those two fields.
  • The Yelp Open Letter Makes Me Glad Social Media Arrived After I No Longer Knew Everything
    In 2000, I worked for a startup. The name doesn't matter – like most startups, it didn't make it. The important thing, for the purposes of our story, is that I was a recent grad, awe-inspiringly entitled, fairly poor, and perhaps not very good at my job yet. The only thing I had going for me was that there was no social media, so there was no way for me to ruin my reputation with more than, say, three people. In this, I was much more fortunate than Talia Jane, the recently terminated Yelp/Eat24 employee. Jane's open letter to her CEO, which she published on Medium a few days ago, ignited the kind of internet firestorm that's generally reserved these days for arguing about Bernie Bros or Donald Trump. The question, of course, is what to make of her letter and its aftermath. Is she an entitled whippersnapper who doesn't know how to sacrifice, or a voice of her generation pointing out systemic unfairness ... and getting punished for it?
  • Roger Goodell Makes a Lot More Money Than NFL Players, and Here's Why You Should Care
    NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell took a pay cut last year. Before you feel too bad for him, however, keep in mind that even after a $1 million cut, Goodell made $34.1 million over the 2014-5 season – more than every football player in the league, save Atlanta Falcons QB Matt Ryan, whose signing bonus brought his pay up to $36.5 million. Why are we even paying attention to millionaires, when the average American worker would be happy to score more than a 3 percent annual raise? Well, the commish-to-player pay ratio reminds us that the guys at the top of the corporate ladder often far out-earn the people whose work keeps them there. In short, it's not just that the CEO makes more than you do; it's that the CEO makes a lot more than you do.

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