• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: 13 Signs You Need to Quit Your Job
    It's never a good idea to quit your job without having another job lined up. That said, sometimes there are signals that you should start finding that new job as soon as possible. In this week's roundup, we look at a few symptoms of a job that begs for your resignation letter, plus the best books to read instead of getting a life coach, and the interview follow-up you're not doing.
  • What's Next? Teachers Who Change Careers Have Many Options
    Teaching is difficult and interesting work. It can be wonderfully fulfilling and simultaneously almost unbearably frustrating and stressful. Generally, it's not the kids who make teachers want to move on to another profession. Rather, it's something about the system itself, the culture, that eventually adds up to be too much. Some teachers are driven away by the long hours and low pay, others feel they need to move on because of trying relationships with administrators or too much tension with parents. Others find the curriculum, or the accompanying standardized tests, too limiting and confining.
  • 4 Reasons Why Chasing Money Isn't the Same as Pursuing Happiness
    First things first: there's a difference between negotiating salary and chasing money. The former consists of you advocating for yourself, and insisting on being paid fair wages for your hard work; the latter confuses money with the stuff money is supposed to provide, namely security, happiness, and a bright future. Here's why chasing a big paycheck isn't necessarily the path to success.
  • Millennials Are Afraid They Won't Be Able to Get Ahead and They Might Be Right
    Despite the difficulties they faced entering the job market during the worst recession in decades, millennials have found their way into the workplace, even teaching older generations a thing or two about new ways to work along the way. But, financially, it's been a rough decade or so for the youngest generation of workers.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How Will Your Job Change in 2016?
    The world of work changes all the time, often without our even realizing it. For example, if you were in the workforce 20 years ago, you likely couldn't work at home, whereas an increasing number of companies allow workers to do so, at least part-time. (Of course, on the other hand, you also didn't have to check your email on the weekends – technology giveth and technology taketh away.) In the first roundup of 2016, we look at the workplace trends that might change your job next year, as well as lessons to learn from even your worst boss and good habits to save you time and energy in the coming year.
  • The Career Lessons of Tough Love, aka 'Radical Candor'
    Former Google and Apple University employee Kim Scott is making waves with her approach toward clearing the air at work. Much like Festivus' "airing of grievances," her theory of "radical candor" can be a saving grace when you're out to make a co-worker or report a better and happier employee. While we're often taught that if we don't have anything nice to say, we shouldn't say anything at all, her approach gets out ahead of problems before they become unresolvable.
  • Why Unions Need Saving, and Why Millennials Might Be the Best Ones to Do It
    Labor unions have a long history in this country of protecting workers. Unions protect workers' collective bargaining powers and help them negotiate better wages, hours, benefits, job security, and working conditions. However, these days unions are in jeopardy, and it turns out that millennials could be the ones to save them. Let's take a closer look at this issue, beginning by examining some of the reasons why unions are in trouble.
  • What Do Your Childhood Dreams and Career Goals Say About You?
    When you were a kid, what did you say that you wanted to be when you grew up? If you're anything like the kids of today, your dreams started off a little unrealistic (think superhero or panda bear) and smoothed out over time, leaning toward things like doctor, teacher, or police officer.
  • Yes, You Can Learn Something From Getting Fired
    There's nothing good about getting fired … or is there? We think there are actual life lessons to be learned when you get the boot, and if you take them to heart, you'll likely be a stronger, better, more attractive person (or maybe just the first two). Either way, there are good things to learn from a horrible situation.
  • Why Your Child Will Likely Live at Home With You Until They're 35
    The Great Recession had an impact on every age group, but there is no doubt that it caused specific challenges for the youngest generation in the workforce, the millennials. After graduating with the highest student loan debt in history, millennials (born between 1980 and 1995) entered the labor market during a time of economic crisis.
  • 10 Quotes to Inspire Your Career in 2016
    It's that time of year again: another year down, and a new year is just around the corner. If this past year didn't treat you as well as you had anticipated, then don't beat yourself up over it, because it happens to the best of us. Remember, success is not the absence of failure – it's quite the opposite, actually. In fact, the wise words of Friedrich Nietzsche remind us: "That which does not kill us only makes us stronger." Take the lessons learned (or, the blessings in disguise) from the year prior and use them to make 2016 your best year yet with these 10 inspiring quotes for the new year ahead.
  • 6 Key Supports to Have in Place for a Midlife Career Shift
    Changing careers is more common than you might think. After a time, the excitement and novelty of a job, or even an entire industry, can wear off and we realize we need a change. Perhaps new management or protocol/procedures help to push us toward the decision. Maybe, changing careers (often during our mid-30s to early 50s) is about chasing a dream, old or new; and who needs a better reason than that? For one reason or another, a lot of people decide at some point along the way to shift careers. It can be an exciting and ultimately rewarding choice, but it's important to make the proper preparations before taking the leap. Here are a few key supports to have in place before making a midlife career shift.
  • 4 Surprising Facts About Retirement and How We're Getting Ready For It
    There is no shortage of reminders urging you to prepare for your retirement in advance – even in your 20s, as far in advance as you possibly can. These days, people are also considering other kinds of preparations that go beyond finances. For example, there's a move toward emotionally preparing for retirement, which seems like a good idea since new research has linked depression with retirement, especially for men.
  • Depression and Retirement Often Go Hand in Hand, Especially for Men
    For many of us, retirement inspires mixed feelings. Of course it's an interesting phase of life to ponder. But, fantasizing about how lovely it will be to wake up without an alarm clock, or to retire the suits and ties and dress shoes to the back of the closet only to be worn again on special occasions, is really only the beginning. Pretty soon we start to wonder: what would I even do with all that free time?
  • Could Your Humanities Degree Lead You to a STEM Job?
    If you're a humanities major, chances are you'd never heard of STEM a couple of years ago. The acronym, which stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, entered into the popular consciousness alongside the growth of the industries it's associated with, and as educational programs developed and grew in order to meet the need. There is no doubt that these fields, and the jobs associated with them, are on the rise. Still, although STEM is important, we shouldn't forget about the humanities. Your liberal arts degree might be the perfect background for a job in STEM.
  • What Today's Kids Say They Want to Be When They Grow Up
    When you were younger, how did you answer the question, "What do you want to be when you grow up?" These days, there is a lot of evidence to suggest that this is a question we really shouldn't even be asking little kids; it might be sending the wrong message about identity. But, since the question persists, we might as well take a look at some of the answers kids are providing. They shed interesting light on the different messages boys and girls are receiving about potential career options, and how these messages have changed over time.
  • How to Get the Job If You're Overqualified
    Even when jobs aren't scarce, you might find yourself pining for a position that is more hands-on and less middle management. When you're submitting a resume, however, hiring managers might get the wrong idea of you "taking a step back" for the open position. But, you can still make your case and land that job, with a few simple techniques.
  • When Is the Best Time to Negotiate Salary?
    What do entry-level workers and executives have in common? To get the salary they deserve, they both need to negotiate. That's bad news if salary negotiation makes you uncomfortable, but the good news is this: by negotiating pay, you're almost certain to earn more over the course of your career. However, timing is everything, so let's talk a little bit about when to ask for the salary you deserve.
  • The 4 Largest US Endowments and Foundations
    Not sure about the difference between a foundation and an endowment, or why you should care about either? These nonprofit organizations fund education, scientific research, the arts, and healthcare. They have billions of dollars under their control and they invest in a variety of areas from bonds to real estate. Learning more about the largest endowments and foundations in the U.S. can help you understand the impact they have on humanity and the economy. Who knows, you might even want to consider working for one someday.
  • The 4 Worst Cities to Retire
    There may be something of a retirement crisis in America. Due to a strained economy, high education costs, and fewer companies offering retirement accounts to employees, workers are expecting to retire later than they used to. But, for at least a decade, folks have tended to leave their working lives behind sooner than they expected – often due to health problems or some other factor. Now, although the expected retirement age is 66, the average age for making the move is actually 62. The crisis then is pretty clear – a lot of folks are retiring without quite being able to afford to do so.

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