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  • 5 Ways to Get Organized and Prep for Your Best Year Yet
    Now that the holiday craze has died down and it's back to reality, it's time to get serious about what lies ahead for 2015. Before you dive headfirst into your new year's resolutions list (which you dusted off from last year), we've compiled a list that will help you get your life and career on track for the coming year.
  • How to Get a New Job, Without Changing Companies
    If you are looking for a change, it is often possible to look for a job within your company. A cross-functional exposure that enhances your skill-set, or even a move to a different team that performs the same job as you, could help your career. An internal transfer offers you the opportunity to network and work with various colleagues, clients, and partners. It also helps you learn and deal with various leadership styles and team dynamics.
  • 5 Ways to Slim Down on Mindless Social Media Use in 2015
    Checking social media non-stop around the clock has probably become more of an addiction than a habit, sucking up valuable time and energy that you could be using to advance your career. Here are a few tricks for being more productive with your social media usage in the new year.
  • 5 Steps for Building Your Own Professional Website
    Whether you are a job seeker, an independent jewelry designer, a freelance journalist, an aspiring filmmaker, or the owner of a new food cart, a strong online presence is a key part of every professional and small business's marketing strategy. The backbone of this presence is your website. And unless your small business is a web design company, or you are successful enough to hire a programming whiz (in which case you would have probably already needed a website by now), you most likely have neither the funds nor skills to fork over thousands to a professional for the perfect site. Thankfully, in today's sea of freelancers, entrepreneurs, and independent contractors, a lack of money and programming knowledge does not stand in the way of a great-looking site that does not break the bank.
  • Want to Get More Done at Work? Do Less
    Some good news for anyone sick of 12-hour days at the office: the key to maximizing professional productivity may not be to work more, but rather to work less. According to a recent study conducted by the Draugiem Group, a social networking company, the average person remains productive for 52 minutes at a time. Using its productivity tracking app, DeskTime, the Draugiem Group analyzed users' time and tasks and found that the most productive 10 percent were those who worked for 52-minute intervals followed by 17-minute breaks, over the course of a workday that often lasted fewer than eight hours.
  • 3 Tips for Meeting With a Career Coach
    At any point in your career, meeting with a career coach could be beneficial. But, most people hire one when their professional lives reach a critical juncture. When you are changing positions, working toward different goals, making a geographic change, or switching industries or professional direction, a career coach can provide valuable insights and strategies that help you get where you'd like to be.
  • The Art of the (E-mail) Close
    Signing off as "Salty" instead of "Sally." Including 18 line items in your signature block, including your parents' home number. Forgetting that you already pushed "send" on your daily e-mail to your mom, and closing the subsequent e-mail to your boss with, "Love, Sean XOXO." Realizing that upon sending said e-mail to your boss, you accidentally hit "reply all" and thus also sent your hugs and kisses to your entire team. The ways we can bungle a professional e-mail are endless and there is arguably no worse way than how we sign off.
  • Why You Should Never Lie During the Job Interview Process
    Whatever you do, don’t blatantly lie -- not on your resume, not in the interview. There are only two outcomes to lying for a job: you get caught and you don’t get caught. Either way, the impact of your lie can be long-lasting. It can surface at any point, during an investigation, a job promotion, even a transfer.
  • 3 Ways Learning a Language Could Boost Your Career
    The world has changed so much in the last couple of decades. Technology has shifted the way we work in fundamental ways. As a result, skills that used to be highly valued in a professional context have become less important, and other skills and talents are coming into sharper focus. Professionals need to bring something to the table that can't be achieved by a machine. Traits like creative talent, an ability to multitask, and excellent interpersonal skills are becoming increasingly important. Learning a new language might give you that extra edge you've been searching for.
  • 5 Reasons You Need a Mentor – and How to Find One
    After years of training and education, you've finally landed a great position in your field. But no matter how much preparation you've done, a mentor could help your career, and assist you personally, in profound ways.
  • 4 Tiny Changes That Will Help You Work Smarter, Not Harder
    Many of us live to work, rather than work to live. According to the Department of Labor, the average American between the ages of 25-54 with children spends a whopping 8.7 hours on "working and related activities" each day, but only one hour on "eating and drinking" and two-and-half on "leisure and sports." While you're unlikely to convince the boss to let you cut your day short in favor of spending more time watching TV, you might be able to make a few small changes that boost productivity and get you out the door as soon as possible. Plus, if you take care of yourself, your time at work will be more pleasant.
  • 3 Ways Your Husband Could Be Holding You Back Professionally
    If you're in a happy, committed relationship, the last thing you want to hear is that your wonderful partner might be negatively affecting your career. For working women who are married to men, however, it's important to recognize the ways in which the marriage penalty can crop up, even for childless couples -- through no fault of your husband's.
  • Have a Conscientious Spouse, Get a Promotion
    Even if we have a clear and distinct separation between our personal lives and our professional ones, there is no doubt that how things are going at work can affect how we feel at home. Despite our best efforts, most of us find it difficult to not bring home the stresses, or successes, of the day. Likewise, the goings-on of our personal lives can impact our careers.
  • Many Americans Would Improve Their Career Before Health or Relationships [Infographic]
    A new survey from Huffington Post reveals some surprising results about what makes Americans happy. Namely, nearly one-third of those surveyed would choose to improve their career or finances over their health or their relationships.
  • 3 Tips for Keeping Your Spirits Up During a Lengthy Job Search
    Looking for a work can be the hardest job you’ll ever have, and sometimes it can go on for quite a while. It can be a daunting, frustrating, humbling, and nerve-racking experience to search month after month for the right opportunity. New research suggests that having a positive attitude can have a profound impact on your job search.
  • The Key to Success Is Authenticity
    Successful entrepreneurs have one thing in common that has very little to do with luck, education, or money – it’s actually their ability to be true to themselves and their dreams. Let’s take a look at three entrepreneurs whose authenticity helped them build wildly successful empires, even when the odds were against them.
  • You Don't Have to Be an Entrepreneur
    If you watch Shark Tank, the reality show in which would-be moguls pitch their ideas to celebrity businesspeople, you've probably heard Mark Cuban say the following to at least one business owner: "You are not an entrepreneur, you're a wantrepreneur." That might sound bad --"wantrepreneur" sounds a lot like "wannabe" -- but it's not that cut and dried. There are creative people who would not make great entrepreneurs, but who have great ideas and much to contribute beyond being a cog in somebody else's machinery.
  • 5 Jobs That Pay Well, But May Not Be Fulfilling

    Some jobs don’t offer warm fuzzies, but they do give you a fat paycheck. If having that comfortable income is a priority for you, and you can find meaning in other aspects of your life, then here are some careers you might want to consider.

  • Happy Workers Love Their Mothers

    Did you know your mother follows you to work? Well, she may not actually be following you to your desk, but her influence does. A recent study found that mothers play a unique role in what kind of worker you become. It turns out that a strong relationship with your mom may cause you to be less focused on money, and more focused on finding meaning and purpose in what you do.

  • How Sports Psychology Helps Workers
    Sports psychologists -- psychologists trained specifically to help athletes perform their best -- have become in demand in recent years, according to the British Psychological Society. But even if you're not an elite athlete, sports psychology can help you perform better at your job.