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  • Microsoft EVP Stephen Elop's Layoff Memo: By the Way, You Might Not Have a Job Next Year

    Yesterday, the hinted-at changes in Microsoft's workforce took shape and heft, to the tune of 18,000 job cuts over the next year. The figure represents about 14 percent of Microsoft's workforce. The majority of those cuts, 12,500 jobs, will come in Microsoft's devices and services unit, which absorbed Nokia last year. How did workers in the mobile unit discover this? In the eleventh paragraph of a memo from former Nokia CEO and current Microsoft executive vice president Stephen Elop.

  • Court Upholds U. of Texas Affirmative Action Policy
    Consideration of race in admissions will continue at the University of Texas per a federal appeals court ruling this week. In a 2-1 vote, the appeals court upheld an earlier district court ruling which found the school’s use of race as a supplemental factor in bringing together a diverse student population to be fair. However, the school's fight to keep affirmative action is not over.
  • The Relationship Between College Graduation, Race, and Time? It’s Complicated

    The race gap has narrowed significantly in college enrollments, with 65 percent of black high school graduates attending college, compared to just under 70 percent of whites in 2011, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. However, the gap in graduation rates remains wide and admission to college has little value if a degree isn’t the end result.

  • Obama Wants Paid Maternity Leave for Working Families
    At the White House Summit on Working Families last month, President Barack Obama said that working families in this country should have paid maternity leave.
  • The Best and Worst States to Be a Working Mother
    Some states offer new parents and families additional protections in the workplace, on top of federal protections. Many, however, do not. How does your state stack up?
  • Wealthy College Presidents May Be the Reason You’re Broke [infographic]

    A recent report released by the Institute for Policy Studies finds that student debt and low-wage faculty labor are rising faster at state universities with the highest-paid presidents. Usually those three hotly debated issues: student debt, increased use of part-time faculty, and inflated executive pay are discussed as separate issues, but researchers wondered if the three were related. What they found shows that all three are connected in ways worthy of a Charles Dickens novel.

  • Women Need to Fall in Love With Computer Science ASAP

    Last month, Google revealed, for the first time ever, just how big the company’s gender gap is. Only 30 percent of Google’s overall employees are women and when looking specifically at tech-related jobs, the number drops to 17 percent. As it turns out, Google isn’t the only tech company with alarmingly low numbers of women.

  • Happy Workers Love Their Mothers

    Did you know your mother follows you to work? Well, she may not actually be following you to your desk, but her influence does. A recent study found that mothers play a unique role in what kind of worker you become. It turns out that a strong relationship with your mom may cause you to be less focused on money, and more focused on finding meaning and purpose in what you do.

  • Another Benefit of a Shorter Work Day: A Better Commute
    The Swedish city of Gothenberg recently rolled out a 6.5-hour work day to some of its municipal workers, in a year-long study aimed at boosting worker productivity and job satisfaction. Over at LinkedIn, Rick Johnson argues that a shorter work day would offer another perk to stressed-out workers: less time on the road, traveling to and from work.
  • Obama May Sign Executive Order Protecting Gay People in the Workplace
    Currently, there is no federal law protecting gays and lesbians against discrimination. Twenty-one states have enacted such protections, but in the remaining 29 states, employers may, for example, fire an employee for being gay.
  • Starbucks Offers Free Online College Classes to Employees

    Want to get that bachelor's degree you’ve always wanted, but couldn’t afford? Become a barista. The Starbucks Corporation announced Monday that it's going to finance online degrees for employees via Arizona State University. The Starbucks College Achievement Plan, the first of its kind, will be available to U.S. Starbucks employees working at least 20 hours a week.

  • The Future of Minimum Wage: More Money, But No More One-Size-Fits-All

    At the beginning of the month, Seattle's city council voted unanimously to increase the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour in stages over the next three to seven years. To get a business owner's perspective on the issue, we spoke via email with John Pepper, co-founder and former CEO of Boloco, a Boston-based restaurant chain with 22 units across New England. Pepper told us a bit about why a higher minimum wage isn't necessarily bad for business and what else needs to change for small businesses to thrive while paying their workers higher wages.

  • College Enrollment Is Dropping and That's Not a Bad Thing

    According to a recent report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, some older students are actually leaving school to return to an improving job market. Since last year, enrollment dropped by 0.8 percent; over the previous year, enrollment declined 2.3 percent.

  • College Grads: Hiring to Increase Nearly 9 Percent

    The Class of 2014 may not have to don fast food uniforms after the caps and gowns come off. Employers that hire new grads are feeling optimistic about the market and plan to hire 8.6 percent more college graduates this year as compared to last. Starting salaries for this year's class are also up by 1.2 percent, all this according to a recent survey released by The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

  • Did Harvard Punish Student Entrepreneurs or Teach Them How Business Really Works?
    Two savvy freshmen at Harvard University are making headlines. They started a potentially successful business on campus, but the real media attention focused on the reaction of the university.
  • Why Obama's Executive Order Against Pay Secrecy Matters

    On April 8, 2014, President Obama signed the Non-Retaliation for Disclosure of Compensation Information into law. This executive order prohibits federal contractors from retaliating against workers who discuss their wages and salaries, but even if you don't work for the government, it's part of a trend that could affect your working life.

  • Some NFL Cheerleaders Earn Less Than Minimum Wage
    Most of us don't work in exchange for perks. Instead, we agree to pay that equals at least the minimum wage and expect to be paid for hours worked. Unless, of course, you are a cheerleader. Recent lawsuits brought against several NFL teams are shedding light on the alleged exploitation of women who are employed as cheerleaders.
  • Rakesh Agrawal Gripes About PayPal Colleagues on Twitter

    On Friday night and early Saturday morning, PayPal's Director of Strategy Rakesh Agrawal quit his job and then made several tweets expressing his opinions about his former colleagues at the company. They were not positive, nor were they coherently expressed, even by 140-character standards.

  • Big Surprise: Raising the Minimum Wage Is Good for the Economy
    Opponents of raising the minimum wage continue to scream that paying working class people higher wages will destroy the economy and the American way of capitalistic freedom will end. We have hard evidence that this is simply not true.
  • Tell Me Your Salary, I'll Tell You Mine
    If you were absolutely sure your boss couldn't retaliate against you for revealing your salary to your co-workers, would you tell? Thanks to improved worker protections, we might soon find out.