• When Are Creative Job Applications Too Creative?
    You may have heard by now about Leah the Lego figurine. Leah is the perfect Account Service Intern, complete with a blue suit and sensible shoes. She made her debut applying for positions at advertising agencies. It's an attention-getting idea; and the first step in getting a job is getting noticed. But will it work?
  • Wealthier Schools Admit Fewer Students With Pell Grants

    Payscale's latest college ROI report uncovers a disturbing trend in higher education for low income students. Wealthier schools with the highest ROI may not be serving those who are eligible for federal monies to help pay their way.

  • Union Leaders Are Exempt From the Law in Pennsylvania -- For Now

    The benefits of union membership are numerous, but unions were never conceived to give members or leaders the right to break criminal laws. Pennsylvania's House of Representatives just recently passed a bill that is as necessary as it is surprising.

  • The Department of Labor Has Your Back

    The federal Department of Labor (DOL) budget for fiscal year 2015 is official, and it includes new programs and additional protections for workers and employees. This is exciting news for millions of Americans, including the long-term unemployed, students who want to work when they graduate, and current employees whose employers may not be following the law as they should. Check out the changes that are being put in place to help you.

  • Woman Denied Lactation Room and Fired Is Not Getting Trial

    "I think it's best you go home and be with your babies" is not what an employee expects to hear upon returning to work after maternity leave. Unfortunately, it is exactly what Angela Ames heard when she requested access to a lactation room to express breast milk. Ms. Ames filed to sue for sexual discrimination, but has been denied access to a trial. The details will make any reasonable person's head spin.

  • Low Wages Are Poverty Wages

    How would you like to put in full-time hours at your job, work hard to perform your job well, manage your household, and yet still spend time waiting in lines for general assistance and charity to pay for your basic expenses, including food and heat? If you are a member of the growing population of minimum- and low-wage workers, this could be you. And the problem affects all of us.

  • President Obama Wants YOU to Receive Overtime Pay

    Good news coming down the pike for the millions of American workers who have been exempted from overtime pay. The New York Times reports that tomorrow, Thursday, March 13, President Obama will direct the federal Department of Labor to stop classifying a series of jobs as "professional" or "executive." How will this affect you?

  • Those Unpaid Security Screenings Might Not Be Legal

    Does your employer require you to go through a security screening before you go on the clock? If so, they might be breaking the law -- but if they are, they're not alone. Employees who work for companies that require security screenings often are not compensated for time spent being screened. Just a few years ago, groups of employees started filing suit against their employers for wage theft. Their basic argument was, of course, that they should be compensated for time given to the employer. If you are ever expected to give up your time without being compensated, here is what you need to know.

  • Bill Gates Is Once Again the Richest Man in the World

    Thanks to surging stock prices, Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates is at the top of Forbes' list of billionaires, a spot he's occupied for 15 of the last 20 years.

  • Pentagon Food Service Workers Allege Illegal Retaliation for Strike Against Contractor Employer
    Recently, The Huffington Post reported that food service workers in the Pentagon filed a complaint against their private-sector employer. They say that they were illegally retaliated against in response to asserting their right to protest for better working conditions.
  • How Not to Respond to a LinkedIn Request

    Job bank head Kelly Blazek is working with a reduced social media presence these days, after a rejection she sent in response to a LinkedIn connection request went viral.

  • The Sometimes Surprising Truth About the Value of the Minimum Wage

    The real value of the minimum wage is going down. Ten different charts on two different websites paint the same picture of how the relative value of the minimum wage has declined over time. In short, when you take inflation and cost of living data into account, minimum-wage workers can buy less for their earnings than they could a few years ago.

  • Are Prevailing Wage Laws Discriminatory?
    If you work as a contractor on projects with federal funding, prevailing wage laws may be pertinent to your rate of pay. An opinion piece published in the Albuqurque Journal makes the argument that "prevailing wage" laws are discriminatory. Understand what these laws say and how they affect you.
  • Well, at Least Your CEO Is Doing OK

    While many of us consider unemployment numbers and whether jobs will be available, hope long-term unemployment benefits are extended, or root for an increase in the minimum wage, there is, of course, at least one person in most companies who seems to be doing OK -- the CEO. In fact, you may be surprised how OK they really are.

  • It's Time Once Again for 'How Not to Do a Conference Call'

    AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has done it again: during a conference call to explain changes to staffers' 401(k) plans, he mentioned that some of the cost was because two AOL-ers had "distressed babies" in 2013.

  • 3 Things Employers Won't Tell You About Social Media
    By now, we've all heard stories about people being fired for their social media use, either because they got caught tweeting on the company time, or because they said something outside of work, that tarnished their employer's brand. But there's more to the perils of social media than just saying the wrong thing at the wrong time. Here's what your employer knows about social media that might surprise you.
  • Work at Home? Here's How to Avoid an Audit
    The Consumerist has a helpful list of tax tips to follow to avoid being audited by the IRS. Some of these sage pieces of advice are relevant to people who work at home, or who run home-based businesses. If you work at home, take heed of these three things when reporting your income.
  • Your Favorite Football Team Might Be Guilty of Wage Theft
    Whether you're a fan of the Raiders or some other football team, the abuses alleged in the recent class-action lawsuit filed in Alameda County Superior Court may be more common than the football industry cares to admit. The suit alleges not only the usual wage theft violations such as no overtime pay, but a laundry list of patronizing and insulting, not to mention illegal, requirements that would cause any feminist to wonder at our lack of progress over the last century.
  • What the State of the Union Means to You

    Last night, President Obama called for 2014 to be a "year of action," asking Congress work with him to raise the minimum wage, extend unemployment benefits, and make better educational opportunities available to all Americans. In the meantime, the president has acted alone, issuing executive orders, directing government bodies under his control, and creating teams of private and public citizens. But those tactics will only go so far, if Congress won't act.

  • Who Wants to Raise the Minimum Wage? The Answer May Surprise You
    Is raising the federal minimum wage rate beneficial to the economy or not? We'll take a look at who's for and against raising the wage and how level of education affects people's opinions.