• 89 Percent of Minimum Wage Workers are Over 20 Years Old
    Historically, Americans who didn't attend college (or even those that didn't complete high school) had an abundant job market available to them. Working as farmers or factory workers, unskilled laborers still made less than skilled workers, but they were able to make a decent living and, during many times in history, actually secure a middle-class lifestyle for their families.
  • The 5 Best Cities to Start Your Career
    There are many important factors to consider when deciding where to start one's career. Recent college grads, for example, might want to live close to family or friends, or in an area or region that they are particularly fond of for one reason or another. It's important to like where you live, but it's also important to consider economic/job market factors before making a final decision.
  • Bernie Sanders Proposes Free Tuition, But Can It Work?
    You've probably already heard about Sen. Bernie Sanders' free-college tuition bill, which that promises a tuition-free education, so students can attend state colleges or universities with little cost. It sounds like a great idea, right? We'd no longer be able to complain about all the uneducated masses. Every student would have access to training to land them a career they'd love, without the burden of crushing student loan debt. Employers would have access to a more highly skilled pool of applicants. Eventually, even the economy as a whole could improve. So why isn't everyone on board?
  • The 5 Worst Cities to Start Your Career
    Although the economy (and the job market) have improved in recent years, the progress has been spotty. Some regions are in much better financial positions than others. For example, the unemployment rate varies widely state to state. For recent college grads, choosing where to launch a career is an important decision with potentially far-reaching consequences.
  • Minimum Wage Around the World
    At both the state and federal levels, campaigns to raise the minimum wage are gaining momentum. Last month, congressional democrats proposed a new bill to raise the federal minimum wage to $12 by 2020. And, the Fight for $15 movement has been heating up since it began in November of 2012. In more than 200 towns and cities, April 15, 2015 was marked by the largest protests by low-wage workers in the nation's history. But where does all of this leave the U.S., in comparison to other countries?
  • Americans Are Working Longer, Kissing Retirement Goodbye
    Growing older should be an enjoyable time in a person's life, but that seems to be a thing of the past, based on recent studies that found people are working much longer out of necessity. Read on to see why many aging professionals are working well past their prime and postponing retirement – sometimes, indefinitely.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 223,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Falls to 5.4 Percent
    Economists predicted today's release from the Labor Department would should gains of 228,000 jobs last month, and a dip in the unemployment rate of one-tenth of a percent, and The Employment Situation Summary largely bore out their forecast. The economy added 223,000 jobs in April, and unemployment fell from 5.5 percent to 5.4 percent. The news wasn't entirely rosy, however: the Bureau of Labor Statistics also revised the previous month's numbers downward from 126,000 jobs to 85,000 jobs.
  • Why Is the American Workplace So Dismissive of Work-Life Balance?
    As Americans, we take pride in hailing from a nation that's led the world in so many key areas for literally hundreds of years. Our revolution sparked others around the world, and our unique ideology helped change the way the entire globe viewed the nature of citizenship and maybe even life itself. There's no doubt, there's something very special about the United States, but, there is one key area where we've fallen way behind in a big way – work/life balance.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 169,000 Jobs in April
    Ahead of this morning's ADP National Employment Report, economists predicted that private payrolls would add 200,000 jobs. The actual number, 169,000 jobs, represented the lowest job gains since January 2014.
  • McMaster University Is Giving Female Employees a $3,515 Raise to Correct for the Gender Wage Gap
    A great deal of research has surfaced lately showing that the gender wage gap remains a persistent problem. But, few organizations are making an effort to identify the extent of the issue in their own business, and make adjustments.
  • Why Does the Gender Wage Gap Persist? [video]
    Recently, Pew Research Center released a short video to explain the findings from its gender wage gap study. The bottom line: although the gender wage gap has narrowed over time, it still exists. We'll take a look at how the wage gap affects the millions of hardworking women around the world who are required to work twice as hard to be considered half as good as their male co-workers.
  • Who Are the Shrinking Middle Class?
    The PEW Charitable Trusts defines middle class households as "those making between 67 percent and 200 percent of the state's median income." There is a lot riding on that definition, however. If the state's median income is low and the cost of living is high, many families who fit the definition of "middle class" may not have access to things we often associate with being middle class, including education, owning a home, or even just a savings account. The bad news is that, by various measurements, the middle class in every state is shrinking.
  • 7 Reasons You Must Take a Vacation, Even If You 'Can't'
    Many people find it difficult, if not impossible, to take the vacation time that is coming to them and get away from the office for a while. There are always a million reasons why "taking a vacation is impossible right now." Work is too busy, you have a presentation/meeting/client on the horizon that you can't miss, etc. Some folks even proudly proclaim, "Oh, I never use my vacation time," as if that's a good thing. But, in a lot of ways, it's not. Maybe this list of reasons that you simply must take a vacation, even though you "really can't right now" will help to convince you.
  • How Hollywood's A-List Actresses Fight for Women's Equality
    Who better to bring awareness to a vital cause like women's equality than Hollywood stars? We'll take a look at how some of Hollywood's most revered actresses are speaking out about the inequality women face on- and off-screen, and the role the media plays in perpetuating this unconscious bias.
  • Ask4More: 5 Salary Negotiation Tips for Working Women
    Get your negotiation hats on, ladies, and let's narrow that gender wage gap together. Here are five tips to help you negotiate a fair and equal wage that you definitely deserve … unless, of course, you're satisfied with making roughly 20 percent less than a man for no good reason. Yeah, we didn't think so, either.
  • The 4 Easiest Jobs to Keep
    Unemployment data can be misleading. One figure alone cannot paint an accurate picture of the current job market because so many variables come into play when trying to really understand the issue. Depending on education, professional experience, location, and industry, the employment picture can look very different.
  • The High Cost of College Is Leaving Many Students Out in the Cold
    College should be one of the most memorable times in a person's life, not a time of financial stress, anxiety, and hopelessness. However, with the rising cost of attending college and student loan debt more than quadrupling over the past two decades, obtaining a degree is proving to be a strain, especially for students who are financially burdened. One group of low-income students from Columbia University is using social media to shed light on the dismal realities of being a poor student in one of the most prestigious and expensive Ivy League schools in the nation, with a Facebook page entitled Columbia University Class Confessions.
  • The 4 Hardest Jobs to Keep
    Although the unemployment rate (and maybe the economy in general) is improving, the change has been slow and somewhat inconsistent. The unemployment rate is different depending on the region or city in question, and varies quite dramatically by race, gender, and age, as well.
  • 3 Things Millennials Want, 3 Things They Could Do Without
    Born between 1980 and 2000, Millennials are the largest generation group in US history, comprising roughly 75.3 million of the nation's population and surpassing even the Baby Boomer generation. Needless to say, it's important to understand how this crowd thinks and functions, seeing the tremendous impact they have on the workplace and how it will evolve in the very near future. Here's a list of three things Millennials want in their lives, and three things they could simply do without … for now.
  • Ivar's Restaurants Up Minimum Wage Ahead of Seattle's $15 per Hour Mandate
    Ivar's, a seafood chain based in Seattle, deals a little differently with the usual problems facing restaurants. For example, most companies, faced with the challenge of generating PR, just whip up more creative ads. A few years ago, Ivar's did that ... and then put them at the bottom of the ocean. The organization put out the rumor that their late founder, Ivar Haglund, had placed billboards under Puget Sound. The signs, which were supposedly placed in 1954, bore slogans like: "Ivar's Chowder. Worth surfacing for. 75¢ a cup." Ivar's latest trick is no hoax: while some business owners have protested Seattle's minimum wage hike to $15 an hour minimum wage, the restaurant is rolling out a new, higher wage structure to staff before the phased deadlines.

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