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  • Where Wal-Mart Is Paying More Than Twice Minimum Wage
    If you need a job making $15 to $20 per hour, would you apply at Wal-Mart? If you live in Williston, North Dakota, you just might. The very fact that a company known for underpaying its workers is offering such wages has started some interesting conversations about minimum wage.
  • Looking for a New Job? It Could Get You Fired
    Sick of your current job, and thinking about looking for something better? Then you may want to save up enough to pay your bills for a few months, just in case your job searching gets you fired. While many people think they can only be fired for looking for a new job if they do it on their current company's time, that couldn't be further from the truth. Put simply: it is perfectly legal for an employer to fire you for the sole reason that you are looking for a new job.
  • Facebook Can Get You Fired
    Sometimes, we like to think that freedom of speech gives us the right to say what we want to our friends without having to face any consequences. Unfortunately, the law does not see things that way. Our freedom of speech, provided by the First Amendment, only protects us from the government preventing us from speaking our minds. So while you can't go to jail for saying your boss is a pain in the neck, you can certainly get fired for it.
  • Should You Share Your Salary With Your Co-workers?

    Salary transparency is hot right now. More companies are revealing what workers make, in the hopes that it will increase trust, improve productivity, even minimize the gender pay gap. But that doesn't meant that sharing salaries is totally without peril for employees.

  • Higher Minimum Wage Correlates With Job Growth
    One of the biggest arguments against raising the minimum wage has been a pay hike's potential impact on job growth. Many business groups argue that employers won't be able to hire more people if they can't offer low wages. However, recent data from the Department of Labor shows that this might not be the case. Twelve of the 13 states that raised their minimum wage since the beginning of the year have experienced more job growth than lower-wage states.
  • What to Do Right After You Have Been Fired or Laid Off
    It’s Friday morning and there is an eerie feeling going around the office. People seem on edge, and your boss is communicating with you via sternly worded emails that are direct and to the point. Some of these emails may even criticize your recent job performance. You may even know that you’ve made a serious mistake, or you may have been the target of an unruly supervisor or manager who has made your life extremely difficult for weeks, months, or even years. All the signs add up to the last email of the day telling you to come up to the human resources manager’s office, where he or she informs you that your employment with the company is being terminated. What now?
  • Obama Wants Paid Maternity Leave for Working Families
    At the White House Summit on Working Families last month, President Barack Obama said that working families in this country should have paid maternity leave.
  • America Still Lags Behind the World in Maternity Leave
    According to the World Policy Forum, the United States of America, Suriname, and Papua New Guinea have something in common: they are the only nations that do not require employers to provide paid maternity leave.
  • The Best and Worst States to Be a Working Mother
    Some states offer new parents and families additional protections in the workplace, on top of federal protections. Many, however, do not. How does your state stack up?
  • Obama May Sign Executive Order Protecting Gay People in the Workplace
    Currently, there is no federal law protecting gays and lesbians against discrimination. Twenty-one states have enacted such protections, but in the remaining 29 states, employers may, for example, fire an employee for being gay.
  • Is There a Downside to a $15 an Hour Minimum Wage?

    The International Franchise Association has made defeating Seattle's $15 per hour minimum wage its "top policy fight," arguing that laws like these unfairly discriminate against franchisees, who will be lumped in with big businesses and forced to comply with the law by 2017, the earliest deadline of the staged roll-out. PayScale spoke via email with Chad Mackay, President and COO of El Gaucho, a high-end steakhouse chain based in Seattle, for his take on how the law could affect both businesses and workers.

  • The Future of Minimum Wage: More Money, But No More One-Size-Fits-All

    At the beginning of the month, Seattle's city council voted unanimously to increase the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour in stages over the next three to seven years. To get a business owner's perspective on the issue, we spoke via email with John Pepper, co-founder and former CEO of Boloco, a Boston-based restaurant chain with 22 units across New England. Pepper told us a bit about why a higher minimum wage isn't necessarily bad for business and what else needs to change for small businesses to thrive while paying their workers higher wages.

  • Are You Old Enough to Be Protected From Age Discrimination?
    There are a handful of laws on the books protecting workers from being discriminated against due to their age. However, not everyone is protected. Are you?
  • At Some Companies, Too Many Chances to Fix Bad Behavior
    Do you work with the employee from hell? Some company policies enable bad behavior by putting off consequences. Understand what is going on with management and learn to survive working with your toxic co-worker.
  • Should Companies Monitor Workers' Social Media?

    Thirty-nine percent of hiring managers use social media to vet candidates, according to one 2013 survey, and 43 percent of those said they'd decided not to proceed with a prospective hire, based on something they found online. A recent Wall Street Journal article asks, should employers be doing even more than that to keep track of workers' online presence, even after they're hired?

  • What If the Boss Wants Me to Do Something That's Against My Beliefs?
    Life and work would be so much simpler if everything was in black or white. Unfortunately, we deal predominantly in shades of gray. So how do you handle work situations with a boss who tests your limits and breaches your belief system? If only choosing your own boss was an option!
  • Why Obama's Executive Order Against Pay Secrecy Matters

    On April 8, 2014, President Obama signed the Non-Retaliation for Disclosure of Compensation Information into law. This executive order prohibits federal contractors from retaliating against workers who discuss their wages and salaries, but even if you don't work for the government, it's part of a trend that could affect your working life.

  • Some NFL Cheerleaders Earn Less Than Minimum Wage
    Most of us don't work in exchange for perks. Instead, we agree to pay that equals at least the minimum wage and expect to be paid for hours worked. Unless, of course, you are a cheerleader. Recent lawsuits brought against several NFL teams are shedding light on the alleged exploitation of women who are employed as cheerleaders.
  • Big Surprise: Raising the Minimum Wage Is Good for the Economy
    Opponents of raising the minimum wage continue to scream that paying working class people higher wages will destroy the economy and the American way of capitalistic freedom will end. We have hard evidence that this is simply not true.
  • Tell Me Your Salary, I'll Tell You Mine
    If you were absolutely sure your boss couldn't retaliate against you for revealing your salary to your co-workers, would you tell? Thanks to improved worker protections, we might soon find out.