• 6 Key Supports to Have in Place for a Midlife Career Shift
    Changing careers is more common than you might think. After a time, the excitement and novelty of a job, or even an entire industry, can wear off and we realize we need a change. Perhaps new management or protocol/procedures help to push us toward the decision. Maybe, changing careers (often during our mid-30s to early 50s) is about chasing a dream, old or new; and who needs a better reason than that? For one reason or another, a lot of people decide at some point along the way to shift careers. It can be an exciting and ultimately rewarding choice, but it's important to make the proper preparations before taking the leap. Here are a few key supports to have in place before making a midlife career shift.
  • Should You Choose a Big Name Over a Big Salary?
    You're waist-deep in your job search and there it is: the job of your dreams at an even dreamier company. But, when you look at the salary, it's lower than you should be paid. What do you do: go after the big-name job for the sake of your long-term prospects? Or seek out a job where you'll be able to make more money?
  • Could Your Humanities Degree Lead You to a STEM Job?
    If you're a humanities major, chances are you'd never heard of STEM a couple of years ago. The acronym, which stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, entered into the popular consciousness alongside the growth of the industries it's associated with, and as educational programs developed and grew in order to meet the need. There is no doubt that these fields, and the jobs associated with them, are on the rise. Still, although STEM is important, we shouldn't forget about the humanities. Your liberal arts degree might be the perfect background for a job in STEM.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Get Hired at the Holidays
    December feels like a terrible month to do just about anything but wrap presents and eat holiday cookies, but if you're looking for work right now, you can't afford to wait until a less crazy time of year to make things happen. The good news is that even though you might not feel like engaging in a job search right now, companies are interested in hiring – despite what you might have heard about the holiday season being a lousy time to interview. Find tips on making the most of your holiday job search, plus warning signs that your job is about to become obsolete and advice on how to encourage a culture of creativity at work, in this week's roundup.
  • When Is the Best Time to Negotiate Salary?
    What do entry-level workers and executives have in common? To get the salary they deserve, they both need to negotiate. That's bad news if salary negotiation makes you uncomfortable, but the good news is this: by negotiating pay, you're almost certain to earn more over the course of your career. However, timing is everything, so let's talk a little bit about when to ask for the salary you deserve.
  • Want to Get the Job? Make Yourself Into the 'Perfect' Job Seeker
    As we continue to hear positive reports about the state of the economy and a declining unemployment rate, it may be easy to feel confused — if the unemployment rate is so low, how am I still having such a hard time finding a job? In part, it might because commentators aren't looking at the full story. When you account not only for folks who've been about of work for 15-plus weeks, but also consider those who are underemployed, "marginally attached," or "discouraged," the effective unemployment rate has been sitting around 10 percent for the last year now at least, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. So how are you supposed to find work among such stiff competition of other job seekers?
  • Why Over Half of US Workers Are Looking for a New Job
    Are you looking for a new job? If so, you're not alone. According to the new Gallup Workforce Panel study, 51 percent of workers are currently looking elsewhere for employment. Here's why so many are looking for greener pastures.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: When the Boss Acts Like Ebenezer Scrooge About Holiday Time
    In a perfect world, we'd all have the month of December off – or at least, the tail end of it, when the holiday season starts really heating up. Let's face it: not much is getting done during the last half of the month anyway, unless you work in healthcare or event planning. Despite the futility of working at most white-collar jobs in the waning days of the year, the majority of workers will be expected to show up and do a good imitation of someone who's working hard. We all accept that this is so. But, what about when your boss, or your employer, is stingy about actual holidays? Answers to that question, plus advice on how to stop expecting the wrong things from yourself and others, and tips on getting the best job referrals, in this week's roundup.
  • Avoid These 4 Common Interview Mistakes
    You're ready. You've got "Lose Yourself" queued up in your headphones, your résumé is fresh off the printer, and you know you're a lock for this role. But 30 minutes later, you're walking out of the interview and the prospects are starting to look bleak. It's not an uncommon place to be in, and it's probably because of an all too common mistake. Ready to find out where you went wrong?
  • The 8 Worst Things About the Job Search
    Looking for a job is a painful, humiliating experience akin to some kind of Hunger Game or Maze Run. Will you make it out alive? Maybe.
  • Report: Student Jobs Should Build Careers After Graduation
    The financial reality facing today's college students is pretty different than it was decades ago. First of all, the cost of higher education has skyrocketed. The price of attending a private, nonprofit, four-year college, for example, has more than tripled since 1975. And, while the image of the full-time, parent-supported college student who starts working only after completing her degree was never the only reality for students, today's learners must deal with the fact that they can't even hope to work their way through school. Worst of all, perhaps: the student jobs they're likely to find won't boost their careers after graduation.
  • How to Drop Out During the Job Interview Process
    There are a lot of reasons why you might decide not to continue with the interview process, as a candidate: the role is no longer what you thought it would be, you have a huge conflict that's just come up and you cannot make it to the interview, you have a job offer from a different company, etc. But how do you get out of an interview, without completely ruining your chances with the hiring manager or the recruiter?
  • How to Network at Holiday Parties
    As the holiday season approaches, so do the holiday parties. These events bring up mixed feelings for most of us. In a way, look forward to the parties, anticipating that they'll be at least a little bit fun, but there is also so much to do around this time of year, and extra social events can feel like a waste of time. But, holiday parties are actually rife with opportunity – not just to enjoy ourselves, but to do a little professional networking while we're at it.
  • 4 Things to Do While You're Waiting to Hear Back After an Interview
    Yes, it is an excruciating experience, waiting to hear back from the company after a job interview. Did you make it? Did you falter? Do they want to move forward with your candidature? It's a period of thumb-twiddling and nail-biting, but you can do something on your end, instead of just ending up with swollen fingers and uneven cuticles.
  • The Cities With the Lowest Unemployment Rates
    A variety of factors contribute to our understanding regarding the current state of the economy. It's not a simple issue. One indicator stands out though as especially significant, at least as far as many working Americans are concerned: unemployment rates. And, this fall, it seems we've been getting some good news.
  • 7 Interview Questions That Get at What Really Matters
    Eliciting meaningful and sincere responses from prospective reports during the interview process can be a lot harder than in looks, especially when you're a new manager and haven't done it before. It can be all too easy for candidates to misrepresent themselves to some extent during the hiring process. Some questions are better than others for keeping it real and getting at what really matters. So, if you're a new manager and hiring for the first time, here's what to ask to get real answers, instead of just fluff.
  • The 6 Most Endangered Jobs of 2015
    Recently, CareerCast came out with the most up-to-date version of their endangered jobs list. You might notice that many of the industries associated with the jobs listed here have been impacted by technology in one way or another. This isn't a big surprise, but it should resonate as a bit of a warning for folks who find their jobs on this list.
  • Is Your Resume Invisible to Recruiters? Fix it By Removing These 5 Things
    Has your resume been falling flat? You might be telling too much and losing points before you even get a chance to answer awkward interview questions. Here are five items you might have on your resume that you should remove immediately.
  • Networking, Without the Yuck
    If you're looking for ways to further your career, get started in an industry, or launch a new project, chances are you've been told that what you really need to do is network. But, there's something about "networking," especially when you call it by name, that can feel super icky. The good news is that it doesn't have to be.
  • When Job Hunting Turns You Into an Angry Neckbeard
    Job hunting is the worst, and anyone who says otherwise is probably one of those weirdos who love dating. It's a high-pressure situation, with a hefty dose of artificiality, and it demands that you display your best self in a very short period of time. Also, unlike the hunt for the perfect relationship, job searching has high stakes in the immediate future: most of us just do not have the wherewithal to bank the six months of expenses that financial experts tell us we should have. It's no wonder, then, that job seekers sometimes experience psychological fallout from their search, up to and including clinical depression. This makes it harder to get a job. It's difficult to put on a sunny face and look like a person hiring managers should consider when you're feeling, as one Redditor recent put it, "like an angry neckbeard."

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