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  • How to Be Productive When You'd Rather Be Hibernating
    Having trouble getting out of your own way at work since the days got shorter and colder? The bad news is that spring is a long way off. The good news is that at least you're not alone. Lots of people find it harder to be productive and happy, both at work and at home, during the winter.
  • Portrait of a Worker as a Young Man (or Woman)
    What's the average Gen Y worker look like? Understanding that dealing in generalities is always risky when it comes to any demographic, there are a few outstanding skills that Millennials tend to possess. PayScale's Gen Y on the Job data package reveals just a few of the greatest things young workers have to offer.
  • The Benefits of Training Others at the Office
    One of the best, tried-and-true ways to excel at what you do is explain it to someone else. Oftentimes, we go through our jobs -- which can include detailed systems and processes -- without realizing what we are actually doing. If you are years or decades deep into your career, much of your expertise may be "all in your head" -- and you may not even realize there’s a better way to do something, opening up the opportunity to excel more and even advance higher up the ladder.
  • 3 Strange Salary Negotiation Tips
    Most salary negotiation advice is pretty run of the mill. Research the position. Know your worth. Understand the corporate culture you're operating in. Ask for what you deserve. Beyond those solid, staid tips, however, there's a whole realm of tricks waiting for you -- some of which might just get you the dollar amount you're looking for.
  • 9 Tips to Manage your Body Language at Interviews
    Whether you're going to your first job interview, you're out of practice, or you're generally nervous about interviews, make sure your body language doesn't give away your fear and apprehension. Stay aware of these general body language tips that can help you through your interview process.
  • How Long Will It Take You to Get a New Job?
    It's always nerve-wracking to contemplate making a leap to a new job. In today's market, however, where 770,000 American workers have been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer, it's especially scary to consider what could be an extended period of time out of work. Even if you're lucky enough to have a job, it's exhausting to think of pulling double-duty, as you surreptitiously interview around your regularly scheduled meetings. So how long can you expect to look, before you land something?
  • How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You an Interview
    Cover letters, although stressful and time-consuming to write, help the candidates tremendously when they are trying to distinguish themselves from the other applicants. If you want to draw the attention of hiring managers to your unique qualifications or even explain something that’s just not possible through the resume, a good cover letter is the way to do it.
  • Do You Really Need a Cover Letter?
    For many job seekers, the worst part of the job application process is creating a cover letter. In this age of LinkedIn and online applications, it might seem like this part of the traditional procedure is out-of-date and unnecessary. So do you have to write a cover letter? The answer, as expected is, "It depends." More specifically, it depends on how you are applying for a role.
  • 3 Reasons You Didn't Get the Job
    Every job interview, even a bad one, is an opportunity to learn something about how to pitch yourself to companies, and figure out what a given job entails and what the corporate culture has to offer. The problem, of course, is that hiring managers don't always tell you why the company opted to pass, which makes it harder to learn from your mistakes. Here's what might be holding you back, and how to tweak your approach to improve your chances in the future.
  • Non-Compete Agreements: What You Need to Know
    You're excited about your new offer. It's with a good company and in your field of interest. You just need to sign a few documents here, a few contract forms there, and you're ready for a new beginning. But there's this one other document, a non-compete agreement, which you stumble upon just as you're getting ready to turn in all your forms. What does it mean if you sign, and what can you do to protect yourself?
  • 8 Ways to Make Your Next Review the Best One Ever
    Most companies have a rigorous annual performance review and a softer half-yearly check-in, just to see how things are going. You, as an employee, have a lot riding on the performance management process of your company. That number or letter you get at the end of the year decides your raise or your next promotion, and possibly the next career move you want to make. So how can you make the system work for you?
  • What Really Makes Us Love Our Jobs
    If your boss has seemed more than usually solicitous of your happiness on the job over the past few months, you might have Gallup to thank (or blame, depending on your point of view). The organization released research late last year that showed that only 29 percent of US employees were engaged at work. As a result, some organizations panicked, worrying that disengaged workers wouldn't produce, and began to focus on making employees happy. There's just one problem: according to Gallup's CEO, focusing on making workers happy doesn't improve productivity or make them enjoy their jobs more.
  • 3 Questions You Should Never Ask During a Job Interview
    When preparing for a job interview, it's easy to spend so much time practicing answers for questions the interviewer might ask that you neglect to think about the things you'd like to learn about a prospective employer. Don't make that mistake: come prepared with the right questions, and you stand a much better chance of figuring out if you'd actually be happy working for the company on a day-to-day basis. Just make sure you don't ask any of these.
  • How to Apologize the Right Way
    Have you ever worked with someone who absolutely will not apologize, no matter how clearly he or she was at fault? It might not be stubbornness. Many people avoid saying they're sorry at work, working under the assumption that their mea culpa will come off as an admission of weakness. The tricky thing is, they're not entirely wrong.
  • 7 Things You Should Know About Recruiters
    You've received a call from a recruiter and the conversation was rather pleasant. You feel the two of you have hit it off and that you now have a potential ally in your job search. But it's now more than a week, and you haven't heard back from the recruiter and there's no reply to emails either. So what's really happening? Why haven’t you heard back from your "ally"?
  • 5 Reasons Why LinkedIn Still Matters
    LinkedIn is a little different than other social networks, which offer news, community, and sometimes cute cat photos, but lack the laser focus on professionals and the recruiters and companies that hire them. Still, for overscheduled social media users, the question remains: "If I'm on X,Y, and Z social networks already, do I need to go to the time and trouble of creating (and perfecting) a LinkedIn profile, as well?" Here's why the answer is yes.
  • Didn't Get That Much-Anticipated Promotion? Here's What You Should Do Next
    You've worked long and hard this performance cycle for a promotion. You know you’re going to make it; it’s almost there. You walk in to your performance review looking forward to the discussion, only to be disappointed. Your manager only shares your performance feedback and maybe the increment letter. What happened to your promotion? Before you take any drastic steps, here’s what you can do to help your career.
  • Do This Before You Share Your Salary History

    Should you have to share your salary history? No, but try explaining that to many hiring managers -- or getting out of the conversation without tanking your chances at getting the job.

  • Hate Your New Job? Here's What to Do Next
    A few weeks into your new job and you’re already dragging your feet on the way to work. You just can’t come to terms with working at this organization and have a sinking feeling whenever you think of a work day. Is It OK to just quit, or do you have to stick it out?
  • How to Save a Terrible Job Interview
    You’ve done all the prep work for your job interview: rehearsed, brainstormed questions and prepared your answers, planned your itinerary in order to be on time, and gathered your portfolio in case the interviewer asks to see it. By your own high standards, you think you are ready to ace it, but there are still times when you end up with a catastrophic interview, anyway. What can you do to salvage the situation before it becomes a lost cause?