• Don't Hate Corporate Jargon

    If standup comics still did '80s-style comedy specials, corporate jargon would be their new airplane food, the easy target for mild jokes to unspool effortlessly while wearing shoulder pads and standing in front of a brick wall. Heck, even for us contemporary worker bees, it's hard to resist the urge to mock the office buzzwords. We have to have something to do, in between proactively navigating on-ramp processes and leveraging new solutions. But is it possible that business lingo is worth more than a laugh?

  • How to Successfully Collaborate With Co-workers
    In theory, a team should be more than the sum of its parts, with the individual strengths of the teammates contributing positively to the bottom line. In reality, well, a collaboration is only useful if it works. Many factors affect success or failure, including too much time spent in meetings and leaning on others to the point of laziness. When collaboration is successful, it is an incredibly useful tool for productivity and innovation in the workplace. Learn how to do it right.
  • Want to Make a Good First Impression? Choose Your Clothing Carefully
    Our choice of clothing causes others to make assumptions -- sometimes correct, sometimes incorrect -- about who we are. If you want to make the best first impression on a job interview or at work, let your clothing help, not hinder you.
  • 5 Reasons to Start a Book Club at Work

    We know a lot about our co-workers: what they like to eat and drink, what music they’re into, and what they like to read. In fact, these interests often become the basis of our workplace conversations. Maker of trendy eyewear Warby Parker noted a shared passion for reading amongst employees and decided to make book clubs an official component of the company’s culture. It’s been a win for everyone involved. Here’s why.

  • Workplace Fun Increases Productivity
    There's evidence that people who have fun at work are happier, healthier, motivated, and more productive than their stressed-out counterparts. Who'da thunk it?
  • Do Abusive Bosses Cause Cheating Workers?
    Whatever you do for a living, whether it's crunch numbers or play ball, working under an abusive leader derails morale. There is some evidence that when it gets bad enough, workers cheat and even break the law.
  • When the Passive-Aggressive Co-worker Is You
    Many of us are not comfortable with confrontation. That's a problem in the workplace, where communication is key. Fail to deal with conflict honestly, and you might wind up sabotaging a project ... or even your whole career. Here's how to recognize these tendencies in yourself and deal with them.
  • Can Having a Terrible Job Make You a Better Person?
    We've all been there -- seemingly stuck in a job that is less than fun. In fact, a job can be terrible, causing us to second-guess our every move at the office. At the end of the day, in a job like this, it can be easy to confuse your own value and self-worth with your employment.
  • When Your Boss Won't Stop Questioning Your Every Move
    Some bosses can't stop asking questions. "Why are you doing that? Will this really work? Are you sure? Why do you think so?" A barrage of this type of questioning makes many people feel that their bosses do not trust them. It's like taking care of a curious toddler, but it's not cute when it's your boss. Here's how to handle the situation.
  • Work BFFs Are Important, But Millennials Value Them the Most [infographic]

    LinkedIn's Relationships @Work study found that 46 percent of workers feel that their friends at the office contribute to their happiness, both at work and at home. Millennials were the most likely to report positive impacts from their office friendships.

  • Want to Work for a Great Company? Here Are 7 Things to Look For
    There are lots of variables that go into creating the best working environment. How do we judge what a great company looks like? What makes for a happy employee? What makes a great boss?
  • Feeling Unproductive? Blame Talkative Co-workers, the No. 1 Office Distraction

    Noisy neighbors are the biggest disruption at work, according to a recent survey from talent mobility consultants Lee Hecht Harrison. Forty-five percent of respondents to an online poll said that talkative co-workers was the most distracting element at the office.

  • How You Can Create an Awesome Company Culture
    Company culture often comes from the top and trickles down. However, employees also contribute to the feel of the work environment. If your company culture could use some improvement, here are a few ways you may help effect change.
  • A Tweet 45 Days in the Making
    To most of us, social media is a fun distraction: a place where we can post pictures from our vacation, engage in discussions about our favorite television shows, or follow the news on our favorite sports team. For social media managers, it’s a battlefield, where the stakes are high and competition to get the attention of consumers is constantly waged.
  • Afterhours Activities That Can Get You Canned
    Just because you’ve punched out for the evening, doesn’t mean you’re not at risk of getting fired. Many of the things that can land you in hot water at the office apply to when you’re off the clock as well. Phoenix Business Journal recently had employment law attorney and partner at Fisher & Phillips LLP, Shayna Balch, detail some of the more common fireable offenses.
  • Coffee Makes You Honest

    It's common knowledge that your morning cup of coffee, with that dose of caffeine, helps you wake up. Therefore, it is not a big stretch to think that coffee also helps us think through decisions, because we are more awake to do so. However, that cup of coffee does so much more than that. In fact, it just might help you behave in more ethical ways.

  • The Office Curmudgeon Is Better at His Job
    We have so much advice to sift through, when it comes to achieving work-life balance. One expert says to get a hobby. Another advises us to stay positive, or to cultivate friendships. While the rest of us are focusing on these things, it seems the office grump is better at his job -- even though he probably doesn't care what any of the experts say.
  • Not Sitting All Day Isn't Enough to Keep You Healthy at Work

    So you've swapped your traditional work setup for a standing desk, and now you'll never have to worry about the litany of health complaints linked to sitting at work for hours on end, right? Well, sort of.

  • Happy Workers Love Their Mothers

    Did you know your mother follows you to work? Well, she may not actually be following you to your desk, but her influence does. A recent study found that mothers play a unique role in what kind of worker you become. It turns out that a strong relationship with your mom may cause you to be less focused on money, and more focused on finding meaning and purpose in what you do.

  • Another Benefit of a Shorter Work Day: A Better Commute
    The Swedish city of Gothenberg recently rolled out a 6.5-hour work day to some of its municipal workers, in a year-long study aimed at boosting worker productivity and job satisfaction. Over at LinkedIn, Rick Johnson argues that a shorter work day would offer another perk to stressed-out workers: less time on the road, traveling to and from work.