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  • What if All the Good Jobs Disappear?
    You spend years acquiring a specialized skill. You go to school, land the coveted internship and then, your professional coming-of-age. You get the gig. After some time in the field, there's some technological breakthrough. It's exciting, historic and ... it puts you out of a job. Sound familiar?
  • Lean on Me: What a
    Women have fought tirelessly over the decades for equal rights and have, thankfully, made giant strides. So, how is it that in 2013 women are still not "equal" to men in the workforce? Sadly, too many articles have been written blaming men and the proverbial glass ceiling for this unfortunate state of affairs. But hasn't the ceiling been shattered long ago? We should stop pointing fingers at the opposite gender and figure out a solution to eliminate the imbalance once and for all.
  • The Good and Bad New About May's Female Employment Figures
    May's national jobless rate released this week continue the slight, steady gains in employment. The economy added 175,000 jobs and the overall rate climbed up a tad to 7.6 percent. Nearly half those gains were by women. But don't celebrate just yet.
  • Does Age Affect Productivity?
    Does productivity decline with age? A recent study suggests otherwise, claiming today's generation is actually earning less and not as likely to obtain as many academic credentials as workers older than 60. Boy, how times have changed.
  • Report Highlights Hidden STEM Economy
    Science, tech, engineering and math (STEM) careers justifiably get a lot of ink as critical to the economy, the driving force of the future. Half of all those jobs don't even require a bachelor's degree, which is good news for the majority of working-class adults. Yet public policy and public spending doesn't prioritize that half of the STEM workforce. Of the $4.7 billion of federal cash spent on job training, only a fifth of it goes toward training for jobs that don't require a bachelor's.
  • Tired of Reading About Outsourcing? These Companies Are Bringing Jobs Back to the U.S.

    At the height of the recession, you couldn't open a newspaper or click a link without reading a story about an American company that was sending jobs overseas. Even when the economy started to recover, the employment rate didn't keeping pace with economic growth, in part because companies were opening factories in cheaper, less regulated locations abroad and closing factories here at home.

  • Is Diversity Declining in Top Professions?
    A half-century after the advent of affirmative action, diversity in the nation's top professions appears to be stagnating. An analysis by the New York Times includes startling figures showing that the percentage of black doctors and architects, to name a couple fields, has remained the same for two decades.
  • Sheryl Sandberg on Gender Inequality, Women in Tech and Free Speech
    Sheryl Sandberg famously instrumental in Facebook's success also struck up an important national discussion about gender equality in the workplace. The tech giant's chief operating officer recently spoke with the Wall Street Journal's All Things Digital about what's changed and what still needs changing after book "Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead" too the world by storm.
  • Tactful Ways to Escape a (Really) Bad Job Interview
    As job seekers, we've all experienced at least one – a job interview gone terribly wrong. When this happens, how do you cope? Do you bolt or endure it? In this article, we'll look at the three most common bad interview scenarios and give you expert advice on how to tactfully escape with your reputation and sanity intact.
  • Women are Increasingly Both Breadwinners and Caregivers
    As more women join the workforce and climb the corporate ladder they're more likely to fill the role of family breadwinner. Yet those professional advancements come without without the luxury to relinquish any of their traditionally held caregiver responsibilities, like shuttling kids to and from school, taking care of doctor appointments and housework, according to a Pew Research Center study released Wednesday.
  • The 10 Toughest Jobs to Fill This Year
    Forty percent of employers in the U.S. have job vacancies, but can't find the skilled workers to fill them, according to the latest skills survey from staffing agency ManpowerGroup. For those of you hiding under a rock for the past half-decade, that's what we call the skills gap. The disparity between employers' need and workforce ability.
  • Fashion Models Strut Into U.S. More Easily Than Engineers
    If you're tall, thin, gorgeous and make a living off those traits it's easier to get an American work visa than university-trained engineers. A puzzling 20-year-old decision by Congress allowed models to be included in the H-1B class of visas, an oversight that has led to relatively preferential treatment for foreign-born beauty over brain.
  • How Many Grads Have Jobs Related to Their Major?
    A new study suggests the American workforce is remarkably over-educated and underemployed. The young adult workforce, this research claims, holds degrees, but works menial jobs that don't call for the skills they learned in college. Think the stereotypical liberal arts major serving up coffee or philosophy grad dressing storefront mannequins. But is that really the case?
  • Women In Tech Have Advantage When It Comes to Online Jobs
    It’s no secret that the number of men working in technology careers far outnumbers women who are doing the same. And even though the amount of available technology jobs is increasing significantly, women are still trailing behind men in the race to snatching up these tech opportunities. While it’s true that they make up just a little over one-fourth of the science, tech, engineering and math (STEM) workforce, brilliant female minds have also introduced the world to some of the most innovative technological inventions and advances in history. And now, thanks to a plethora of online jobs to pick from, women can hold their own in the tech workforce while embracing more flexibility and greater work-life balance.
  • Pitcher Pays for Peace of Mind, Would You?
    A clerical error posed an ethical issue for San Francisco Giants pitcher, Jeremy Affeldt. The lefty reliever was handed an extra half-million dollars that shouldn’t have been included in his contract and -- despite it being deemed fully legal to keep -- Affeldt opted to sleep at night and gave the money back.
  • 7 Tech Trends That Are Transforming Careers
    In our technology-driven world, it should come to no surprise that the number of available tech jobs continues to grow. Market trends show that IT is now one of the top drivers of how businesses operate; from communication to productivity, to marketing and improving products. Even though some jobs are disappearing due to the development of so many new and emerging technologies, others are adapting and even more are being created.
  • College Grads Want to Work at Microsoft, Not Facebook
    Contrary to popular belief, it looks like Facebook hasn’t yet taken over every aspect of young people’s lives -- especially their career paths. According to global employer research and advisory company, Universum USA, good old Microsoft wins over the younger, popular social network when it comes to where recent graduates want to work.
  • Coming Closer to Pay Parity for Women
    The Equal Pay Act outlawed employers from gender-discriminatory pay practices in 1963, but pay still isn't entirely equal. Now, legislation seeks to expand existing law to enact more protections against male-female pay disparities. Fed up, women are "leaning in" hard on this one, which means the Paycheck Fairness Act, twice rejected by Congress, might now stand a better chance of becoming law.
  • Facebook in Talks to Acquire Waze: Your Daily Commute Is About to Get Social

    It's no surprise when we hear that Facebook is acquiring some company with a product or service that done well in its market. For example, Instagram, the mobile photo sharing site that allows users to upload, modify, and share images, was acquired by Facebook back in April 2012 after numbers showed that many people preferred Instagram for daily activities over Facebook. Now it's time for the infamous social networking site to make its way to the mobile navigation market and purchase Waze, an Israel-based mobile navigation company, to ensure that Facebook users don't miss out on the ability to make their morning commutes more social.

  • Part Time Jobs for Stay-at-Home Parents
    Raising kids is no easy task, especially when trying to stretch a single paycheck from week to week. When one parent has decided to stay at home with the family, a part time job can help to provide some much needed financial support. The good news is that there are many part time career options that give stay at home parents the power to earn and create a balanced family life.