• The 10 Public Colleges and Universities With the Highest ROI

    Public colleges and universities often get short shrift when people talk about the value of higher education. That's because it's so easy to be seduced by the brand-name of an ivy-covered institution of higher learning. But when it comes to getting the highest earning power for your tuition dollar -- and a top-drawer education, to boot -- you can't do better than these schools.

  • Why Do Graduates Leave Their State?
    Public colleges and universities rely heavily on state funding in order to offer affordable classes to their student body. However, in some states, that same student body leaves after graduation, essentially causing the public system of higher education to invest in the workforce for other states. The reasons for this are complex and surprising; it certainly requires more than a quick fix.
  • #PayChat: Examining the Value of a College Degree
    These days, many people question the value of a college education. Is it worth the cost, and how should the value of a college degree be measured?
  • 3 Ways to Get the Most Out of College

    For the price of a college education, you could buy a house in many parts of the country -- sometimes, with enough left over to put a car in the driveway and boat in the yard. Of course, without a college education, it's hard to find enough money for any of those things. But the fact remains that just going to college is no longer enough to set you on the path to success, however you define it. Here's how to get the most out of your (hundreds of thousands of) tuition dollars.

  • Free Community College -- But at a Cost

    How much is a free two-year degree worth? That's the question facing the state of Tennessee. Gov. Bill Haslam's "Tennessee Promise" program offers to pick up community college tuition bills for anything other aid doesn't cover -- at the cost of about $1.1 million of scholarships to four-year schools.

  • Is College Still Worth the High Cost of Tuition?

    For every pundit who assures us that college is not for everyone, there's a study reminding us that employers often feel differently. But with college tuition costs skyrocketing -- even at public schools, and with financial aid -- we could be forgiven for wondering exactly what we're getting out of our tuition dollars.

  • Mapping College ROI, State to State

    Have your heart set on staying in your home state for college or university, or want to get the heck out of dodge to a distant locale? Either way, PayScale's interactive college ROI map has you covered.

  • Which Schools Have the Best ROI for Your Major?

    When it comes to picking a major, earning potential is only part of the picture. After all, if you're a born English major, forcing yourself into a STEM field is more a recipe for discomfort than a guarantee of riches down the line. Once you know what you want to study, you'll need to find the school whose graduates in that concentration find the most success after graduation.

  • College ROI: What’s Different for 2014?
    Today PayScale released our 2014 College Return on Investment (ROI) Report and for those who are avid consumers you might notice some changes from previous years. We have refined our methodology this year to deliver what we believe is the most accurate representation on monetary ROI of a college degree.
  • These 5 Schools Have the Highest ROI

    Want the highest salary potential for your tuition dollars? PayScale's College Return on Investment report looks at the schools that have set up their graduates for the highest-earning jobs.

  • Employers Value Skills Over Majors, Fancy Colleges

    A recent Gallup survey found that business leaders rate job candidates' applied skills and knowledge higher than where they went to school or even which major they concentrated in.

  • South Korean 'Star Teacher' Makes $4 Million a Year

    In the U.S., teachers make average salaries in the $40,000 - 45,000 range. But for one elite tutor in South Korea, teaching earns a wage comparable with that of a CEO or another captain of industry.

  • Why Go to College? Increasingly, Because You'll Make More Money

    Recent research from Pew Research Center's Social & Demographic Trends project shows that college, although more expensive than it was just a few years ago, is probably worth the money -- especially if young workers want to make money and have careers they care about.

  • Take These 3 College Courses to Maximize Your Chances at a Job

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 284,000 American workers toiled for minimum wage last year, despite having a bachelor's degree. CNBC points out that this number, while significantly lower than the 327,000 overeducated minimum wage earners in 2010, is up a whopping 70 percent from 2002. To some extent, it's because today's college grads need to have more skills than previous generations, in order to impress employers.

  • A Bachelor's Degree -- From a Community College?

    Community college used to be where students went to start their academic career, often for less money than they'd pay to attend a four-year school. If you wanted vocational training, or a degree that would transfer to another, longer program, community college was the place to start. But in California, at least, community colleges might soon offer four-year programs -- in high-demand concentrations.

  • Here's a Reason to Get a College Degree: You're More Likely to Work at Home

    Want a job that will let you work from home, at least part of the time? Better get a college degree. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that workers with a four-year degree are much more likely to be allowed to telecommute.

  • Khan Academy Launches New College Prep Program
    The day you find out that you've been accepted to the college of your choice is quite possibly one of the best days in your life. However, when that doesn’t happen, it can seem as though your future hangs in the balance. Khan Academy has introduced a new college prep program that aims to help high school students turn their collegiate dreams into reality.
  • Liberal Arts Majors, Rejoice: Salary Study Says You'll Find a Job That Pays

    Arts and humanities majors might never make as much as engineering and math students, but they're far from poverty-stricken, says a recent study. In fact, the report shows that liberal arts grads eventually make up the salary gap between their trajectory and that of other professionals.

  • Why Is College So Expensive?

    A college degree allows workers in many fields to command more money -- provided they're able to get a job. In an economy where that's still far from a sure thing, how can universities justify charging ever-higher amounts for tuition and fees? In part, it's because they have to.

  • The Value of a Well-Rounded Education
    Critical thinking is a valuable life skill that we often develop during our school years. Many of the most successful among us earned well-rounded, higher educations and the ability to think critically.