• The Controversial Maternity Leaves of Marissa Mayer
    Yahoo's CEO Marissa Mayer plans to take limited time away after giving birth to her twins. She's a high-powered businesswoman, and she's done this before. (This is her second pregnancy, and she took just two weeks off last time.) Is she a heroine, someone we should all look up to – or is she part of the problem?
  • The Hidden Costs of Makeup: Taxed If You Wear It and Taxed If You Don't
    The gender wage gap is an enduring problem that has attracted much attention. But lately, researchers have been taking a closer look at some other, less well-known gender disparities. A recent article in The Atlantic discussed the fact that women who choose not to wear makeup at work may lose out on promotions, salaries, and other benefits, while women who do wear makeup might reap the benefits, but lose time, money, and sleep. For women in the workplace, it seems, makeup is a mixed bag.
  • When You Are the Minority at Work
    It's the first day of work and you're meeting with your new team; while it doesn't immediately strike you at first, you realize soon enough that perhaps you are the only person of color, the only man, the only woman, or the only person of a different faith in the room. It's not an easy start, but you will be able to make it work. Here are a few ways you can avoid isolation and any preconceived biases toward you and your efforts.
  • 4 Working Moms Share the Reality of Maternity Leave in the US
    Last month, we asked working parents to share their experiences with taking parental leave in the US. The responses, which came from people in occupations as diverse as librarian and banker, showed what most of us already know: the United States has a long way to go when it comes to leave for new parents. While top tech employers like Netflix and Microsoft might dangle months or even a year of paid leave, most working parents are left cobbling together disability, vacation time, and FMLA leave – if they're lucky enough to qualify.
  • 5 Things You Didn't Know About FMLA
    The purpose of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is to help employees balance work and personal or medical needs. It was passed in 1993 during the Clinton administration as a way to protect the jobs of workers who needed to take time off to care for themselves or family members, including babies. (The U.S. is the only industrialized country in the world that does not offer paid maternity leave.) Workers who are contemplating taking leave often find themselves confused about what the FMLA does and doesn't cover. Here's what you need to know.
  • Paid Parental Leave Continues to Gain Momentum in the US
    Lately, a lot more American companies have been jumping on the paid paternal leave bandwagon and finally offering their employees more paid time off after having a baby. This is great news for working parents in America – because, if you're a working parent, then you know that the struggle is very real. We'll take a look at how some companies in the U.S. are stepping up their paid paternal leave game, even if the country as a whole still lags behind the rest of the world.
  • Jobs to Thrill Your Inner Child: Professional Mermaid
    Professional mermaid-ing is a highly specialized, fiercely competitive job that's swimming with a school of inner child-thrilling rewards, pun most definitely intended. Depending on a mermaid's employer, location, and experience, job perks can include working with children, wearing incredibly ornate uniforms, getting paid to dance underwater, and swimming with jellyfish (and sometimes sharks) on a routine basis. Though mermaid gigs are largely unadvertised, there are a surprisingly large number of opportunities to fashion a career as a real-life Ariel.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Should Women Even Bother Negotiating Salary?
    Here's a little controversy to wrap up your week: in her latest blog post, Penelope Trunk argues that women are penalized for negotiating salary, and for this and other reasons, they shouldn't do it at all. Whew. Find that, plus what happens when you don't take a vacation, and the best sites to help you land a job in 2015, in this week's roundup.
  • The 5 Highest Paying Bachelor's (and Associate!) Degrees
    Very few students choose their major from a list of top-paying degrees. Even if financial considerations are paramount in your decision process, you'll probably start by examining your strengths and interests. In other words, you might not choose your major for love, exactly, but you don't want to sink time, effort, and money preparing for a career you won't enjoy. That said, there's value in knowing which degrees are most likely to net high-paying jobs for their recipients. PayScale's College Salary Report ranks the highest paying associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees – because no matter what you decide, knowing is better than not knowing.
  • The Shocking Reality of Maternity Leave in the US: 1 in 4 Women Take Only 2 Weeks Off
    Two weeks. 14 days. That's the entire length of maternity leave that most American workers take when their child is born. And, it seems some of us are shocked by that fact. After all, we're all protected by the Family and Medical Leave Act, right? Since 1993, the FMLA has ensured 12 work weeks off in a 12-month period, but that doesn't sync up with the reality that nearly 25 percent of women are forced to return to work after two weeks.
  • #College2Career: Dianne Juhl on the Limits of Traditional Education
    When it comes to choosing a major and making other career-defining decisions during college, Dianne Juhl, CEO and Founder of The Feminine Face of Money, describes herself as a probable outlier. "My choices were totally driven by my financial needs, ambition, and career vision," she says.
  • 7 Tips for Young Women Who Aspire to Be Leaders
    While some girls are busy dreaming about their wedding day, others are fantasizing about being the next Sheryl Sandberg or Mary Barra. For the ambitious, here's some advice to support you in your endeavors and encourage you to become the leader you are truly meant to be.
  • The First Women to Beat Ranger School
    It's impressive news. Two women – Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver – overcame seemingly overwhelming odds to pass the Army's Ranger School, at Fort Benning, Georgia. It's a daunting feat for any soldier, but for female soldiers, it's also a milestone: until this year, they weren't even allowed to attempt the leadership course.
  • Why Do We Rank Schools? Vote for PayScale at SXSW, and Find Out
    How does South by Southwest pick its panels? By asking the internet to choose which of its most burning questions deserves an answer first. This year, PayScale has three potential sessions up for your approval: The Rankers on College Rankings: Why We Do It; How To Diversify Tech & Hack Our Unconscious Bias; and How Working in a Social Agency Made Me Hate Social. Use the SXSW PanelPicker, and tell organizers what you need to know.
  • Adobe Offers More Paid Parental Leave
    Netflix and Microsoft have already paved the way, but now Adobe announced that it's joining the other top tech companies in offering more paid leave to parents. Their leave package is now at 26 weeks (10 weeks of medical leave and 16 weeks of parental leave) – that's double what they offered in the past, but it's not even really a surprise.
  • The Evolution of Gender-Based Career Quizzes
    The use of polarized language as a source of polarized ideas is nothing new. A classic case in point: The Quiz. Though the decision to have a career, a spouse, and/or children is clearly an individual and entirely subjective one, magazines throughout time have provided readers with the sometimes dangerous ability to define their identity, beliefs, and capabilities on the basis of arbitrary questions about life choices. Though such quizzes are silly and pointless when taken literally, comparing the gender-related values represented in contemporary women's magazine quizzes to those that showed up in publications from the 1950s is an interesting exercise that shows how views of women and their careers have shifted, and, for the most part, improved.
  • 5 Ways Working Moms and Dads Can Manage Their Households Like a CEO
    You're probably familiar with articles discussing how "mom skills" translate well in the workplace, especially when it comes to multitasking and prioritizing. However, you don’t hear much about the other way around. In this post, we'll take a look at five ways working parents can use their skills to keep a happy, orderly home.
  • Women Over 65 Are Twice as Likely to Live in Poverty
    The gender wage gap is a persistent problem that's taking a long time to solve. The fact is that on average, women earn about 78 cents for each dollar brought in by men. And, new data suggest that this is having a significant effect on the state of women's finances in retirement.
  • 5 Inspiring Quotes From Young Female Entrepreneurs
    "Anything you can do, I can do better. I can do anything better than you." There are two types of women in the world: those who find those lyrics conceited and arrogant, and those who see those words as fuel to catapult them towards their dreams. In this post, we'll cover five young female entrepreneurs who believed they could do anything better … and did. Here are some of their inspiring words about breaking down barriers and stereotypes to turn their little ideas into big, big business.
  • Bad News, Men: Robots Are Coming for Your Jobs, Specifically
    The robots are coming, and they're going to scoop up some, most, or hardly any of our jobs, depending on which expert you're listening to and which data they're using. What a potential automated takeover would mean for mankind is up for debate, but recent research shows that it's probably mankind, and not womankind, that needs to worry. If robots do take over our jobs, Oxford researchers say, they'll come for the ones that are most often done by men.

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