• For the First Time Ever, Computer Science Is the Most Popular Major for Women at Stanford
    There's no reason to beat around the bush or sugarcoat it: STEM has a woman problem and it has for a while now. However, here's a bit of good news: Stanford University recently announced that, for the first time in the university's history, computer science is the top major for female students this year. Yeah, you read that right.
  • Salesforce Commits to Closing Gender Pay Gap ... to the Tune of $3M
    Earlier this year, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff told The Huffington Post that he would examine the pay of all 16,000 employees at the cloud computing company, with the ultimate goal of eradicating the gender pay gap at the organization. He anticipated that the process would take a few years. Last week, while addressing the Fortune Global Forum, Benioff announced that his company had closed the gap, at least as far as role-to-role parity is concerned, in just six months. Estimated cost? $3 million dollars.
  • Stay-at-Home Moms Are on the Rise, But Not Always By Choice
    Families have a lot of tough decisions to make, when it comes to finances. One of the trickiest can be whether or not one parent ought to stay home while the kids are young. There are many pieces to this complicated puzzle, but a recent report shows that one single factor is pretty influential – the cost of child care versus the price of rent. Let's take a closer look.
  • The Gender Pay Gap Begins as Early as Age 5
    The gender wage gap is narrowing, but it persists. In 1963, women earned just 59 cents for every dollar earned by men. Today, the pay gap is smaller – 74 cents on the dollar, or 97 cents when we control for factors like occupation, experience, and skills, per PayScale's report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap. Over the course of a lifetime, this has a big impact, not just on women but on their families.
  • 15 Inspiring Quotes Every Ambitious Woman Needs in Her Life Right Now
    First things first, ladies: give yourselves a well-deserved pat on the back for continuing to fight the good fight for women's equality – even if it is the same battle we've been fighting since 1776 when Abigail Adams pleaded for John Adams to "remember the ladies" when penning the Constitution. The good news is that women have come a long way since then and are making huge strides in their fight for equality, especially in the workplace. Here are 15 inspiring quotes to help motivate you to continue your quest to bring women parity in their careers once and for all.
  • PayScale's Latest Report Shows That the Gender Pay Gap Is Real
    Look at PayScale's Gender Pay Gap report, and one thing will stand out right away: women still earn less than men. There's no industry in which women earn as much or more than men, even after controlling for factors like years of experience, skills, education, and company size. So, while the controlled gender pay gap of 2.7 percent, or 97 cents on the dollar, is smaller than the stats you usually hear – 78 cents for every dollar a man earns, for example, according to the White House – it still represents a real disparity in pay, and one that can't be explained away by choice of occupation or the experience lost due to time out to care for children.
  • Is Diversity Important for Corporate Boards? Men Say Not Really...
    Although diversity has been proven to stimulate innovation, enhance creativity, and lead to better decision-making and problem-solving, there is still a problem with lack of diversity (in terms of both gender and race) in the upper echelons of corporate life.
  • Here's Why Amazon's New Parental Leave Policy Matters
    If you've missed out on the back and forth between Amazon and The New York Times, the short version is that it has hardly been a mutual admiration society. At the end of the summer, the newspaper published a scathing report detailing how the company is "redrawing the boundaries of what is acceptable" in how far it can push its employees. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos was quick to respond with an internal memo, saying that he did not believe the company in the article was the Amazon he knows, encouraging employees to report any instances of the behavior it described. Now it seems Amazon is taking concrete steps to correct that perception more broadly.
  • SXSW Cancels Sessions About Gamer Harassment Due to … Harassment
    Recently, it was announced that SXSW had cancelled two panels about harassment and online gaming due to threats of violence. In reaction to this decision, a few notable media companies, including Buzzfeed and Vox, have withdrawn from the festival. As the producer of an accepted panel, "How to Diversify Tech & Hack the Unconscious Bias," we know very well the costs of unequal opportunities on women in the workplace. The goal of our panel is to discuss the root causes of this inequality, and one of them is a cultural climate hostile to women in STEM and other male-dominated spaces. Our panel focuses on fighting bias in the workplace, but we advocate for fighting bias and harassment toward women in any environment.
  • The Best & Worst States for Working Parents
    If you're a working parent finding it near impossible to balance your career and your life, it may have something to do with where you live. Read on to see which states are the best and the worst for working moms and dads, and where your state falls on the list.
  • Another Reason to Avoid Giving Your Salary History: The Gender Wage Gap
    When negotiating a job offer, it's best to avoid giving your salary history to your prospective employer. Revealing your previous earnings could get in the way of landing that big pay bump you're hoping for. Also, there is another reason to consider not giving your salary history – the gender wage gap. For women, revealing previous salaries might reinforce future low earnings. Here are a few important things for women to keep in mind when navigating salary negotiations.
  • This Site Will Tell You Exactly How Much Maternity Leave Your Employer Offers
    When's the right time during a job interview to ask a prospective employer about maternity leave? If you're like most working women, you probably answered, "Never." It's hard enough convincing a hiring manager that a candidate of childbearing years is worth the risk, without giving them an excuse to shut the door on the conversation. This week, Fairygodboss, a site that reviews employers with working women in mind, released its Maternity Leave Resource Center, allowing women to research companies' maternity leave policies before they accept a job offer – no awkward interview questions required.
  • 5 Surprising Facts About Lunch Breaks
    Most of the time, lunch doesn't really feel like that big of a deal. If we're able to take a lunch break, we generally feel glad, and enjoy a short respite from the craziness of the workday. Often though, we lunch at our desks, or on our feet, unable to take the time to sit down and eat, even just for a few minutes. Still though, what does it really matter? Well, here are a few surprising facts about lunch breaks that might inspire you to pay a little more attention to how you spend this time.
  • Why California's Equal Pay Law Is a Step In the Right Direction
    On Tuesday, the California Fair Pay Act was signed into law. Different from other equal pay legislation, it mandates that women receive equal pay for "substantially similar work." California women make about 84 percent of what men make (higher than the national average of 78 percent), but women of color are the most disproportionately affected by the gender pay gap: African-American women bringing in 64 cents on the dollar, and Latina women making 44 cents.
  • Hey, Men: Gender Equality Is Good for You Too!
    In his TED Talk last spring, Michael Kimmel spoke about something he knows something about: men and privilege. Not only is he a middle-class white male (arguably the most privileged since the dawn of time, by his estimation), but he's also a sociologist and author who studies how equality (or lack thereof) affects everyone, not just those left out in the cold.
  • To See How Few Women There Are at the Top, Photoshop Out the Men
    If you watched the Democratic primary debate last night, one thing probably stood out to you, regardless of your political leanings: Hillary Clinton was the only woman on the stage. In fact, as far as American politics is concerned, one out of five is just about the norm: currently, women hold 104 out of 535 seats in Congress, a 19.4 percent average. (It gets worse if you look at women of color – 31.7 percent of the number of women, and just 6.2 percent of the total.) Of course, we love data, but numbers can seem abstract. Sometimes, you can't beat a good visualization to really see the problem. Recently, British Elle's feminism issue gave us just that, with a video that shows men gradually removed from photos of politics in action ... leaving just a few women behind.
  • Jennifer Lawrence Speaks Out About the Gender Pay Gap
    Jennifer Lawrence is known for being a badass, whether she's on the big screen fighting a dystopian civil war or railing against body shaming to Barbara Walters. Cripes, she's won an Oscar and been nominated for two more, PLUS she's the lead in a billion-dollar grossing movie trilogy (and a half) and she just turned 25! With a no-nonsense head on her shoulders, she's made waves a few times in Hollywood for speaking her mind, but she hasn't spoken out about the gender pay gap, until now.
  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Offers Employees 52 Weeks Paid Parental Leave
    Who says extended parental leave is just for tech companies like Netflix or Microsoft? The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation recently announced a new parental leave policy of 52 paid weeks for mothers or fathers during the first year after the birth or adoption of a child, plus unlimited time off for all employees.
  • Key Results of the 2015 Women In the Workplace Study
    Women in the Workplace, a recent study conducted by LeanIn.org and McKinsey & Company – building off of similar work done by the latter in 2012 – examines the current state of women in corporate America. Over 100 companies and nearly 30,000 employees participated. The survey results and accompanying data shed some light on the fact that women are still underrepresented at every level of corporate life, and the study goes a step further, examining the root causes of the problem. Let's take a closer look at a few of the key findings.
  • Apply the Bechdel Test at Your Next Meeting to Evaluate Gender Diversity at Work
    China's President Xi Jinping recent visit to Seattle was big news for what it signified about the city's rising prominence as a global tech hotspot. But a quick survey of photographs of the Chinese dignitary hob-knobbing with executives in the Emerald City reveals that while more companies are talking about their lack of female executives, it's pretty obvious that we haven't made great strides in actually solving the problem and fostering workplaces where women can rise to leadership roles as easily as men.

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