• Well, at Least Your CEO Is Doing OK

    While many of us consider unemployment numbers and whether jobs will be available, hope long-term unemployment benefits are extended, or root for an increase in the minimum wage, there is, of course, at least one person in most companies who seems to be doing OK -- the CEO. In fact, you may be surprised how OK they really are.

  • What You Need to Know About Your Employer's Social Media Policy and the Law

    The National Law Review recently reported that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) reached a settlement with Georgia-Pacific over their social media policy. This is big for just about anybody who works. As always, the law is trying to catch up with changes in technology and society. The details of this case help inform employees and their employers which businesses may and may not regulate regarding employees' personal use of social media.

  • Young Bankers Are Very Unhappy, and Here's Why

    Unless you're in finance, you probably can't imagine being excited to hear that you get one whole day a week off. But that's the position employees of Goldman Sachs and Bank of America Merrill Lynch found themselves in recently, when their companies unveiled new policies that would require them to take off four days a month. Bankers, especially junior employees, regularly work over 100 hours a week. But that's only one reason they're miserable.

  • Illegal Job Interview Questions: What Can't They Ask Me?

    Congratulations on the interview call. You're almost there. But before you sit across the table or pick the phone to talk to your potential employer, learn to recognize questions that could be illegal.

  • U.S. Threatened by Nationwide Clown Shortage

    When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? If it was a clown, the World Clown Association would like you to know that it's not too late. The organization's membership numbers have dwindled from 3,500 in 2004 to 2,500, ten years later.

  • The Do's and Don'ts of Business Attire for Women [infographic]

    In the olden days (pre-internet, and before the advent of jeans that cost about as much as dinner) people dressed up for work. Nowadays, we have a lot more freedom to choose what we wear. But for many of us, when it comes to dressing for work, too much choice is not necessarily a good thing.

  • Why Go to College? Increasingly, Because You'll Make More Money

    Recent research from Pew Research Center's Social & Demographic Trends project shows that college, although more expensive than it was just a few years ago, is probably worth the money -- especially if young workers want to make money and have careers they care about.

  • 3 Ways to Manage Your Difficult Boss

    Americans who work full-time may spend more time interacting with co-workers and managers than with their own family and friends. Their relationships at work, however, are far different than with trusted friends. When bosses are difficult people, workers often do not have the freedom to confront them or to demand to be treated with common courtesy. For those employees who are not lucky enough to work for polite people, these three strategies may help them maintain their sanity.

  • When One Job Won't Pay the Bills

    Officially, only 4.9 percent of working Americans toil at more than one job, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That's down from 5.2 percent in 2008, at the height of the Recession. So why are some commentators concerned that workers are being forced to work harder than ever to make ends meet? Three words: the underground economy.

  • 4 (Relatively) Easy Ways to Improve Work-Life Balance

    Some of your work-life balance is beyond your control. If your corporate culture dictates that you answer email on the weekend, for example, there's not much you can do on that front to balance your professional responsibilities with your personal commitments. The best approach is to focus on what you can control.

  • Should You Apologize at Work?

    It's one of the first things we learn in school: when you do something wrong, say you're sorry. But once we've put away childish things, apologizing can sometimes make us look weak instead of accountable. So should you say you're sorry at work, or maintain your power position?

  • In One Job, at Least, a Legal Right to Nap

    Over 1,000 garbage truck drivers in Los Angeles are $15,000 richer this week, after the City Council opted to settle a class action suit that claimed drivers were improperly prevented from napping during their half-hour lunch break. Their attorney argued that by not allowing the drivers to catch some Zzzs on the job, the city demanded they remain "on duty," even when resting. The total payout was $26 million dollars.

  • 5 Signs Your Workplace Is Psychologically Unhealthy
    Work is work, and most adults understand that they need not be best friends with their co-workers and managers. We go to work to utilize specific skills, do a good job, and receive compensation. We are not there to sing kumbaya and give each other warm fuzzies. However, there is such as thing as a toxic workplace. If your workplace shows a majority of these five signs of toxicity, you may be working in a psychologically unhealthy environment.
  • The Ultimate Guide to Getting Hired Through Social Media [infographic]
    Landing a job takes more than a decent resume – it also takes a bit of creativity to get noticed, and social media enables candidates to do just that. We’ll take a look at one of the most comprehensive guides available to show you how to successfully use social networks to land that dream career.
  • Fewer People Lost Their Jobs in 2013, But Hiring Is Still Slow

    The economy added a net 1.9 million jobs over the course of 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Job Openings and Labor Turnover survey, which was released Friday. Over the course of last year, 51.4 million people lost or voluntarily quit their jobs, while 53.3 million people were hired. Those are the lowest job lost numbers for any year in the 21st century -- but don't celebrate just yet.

  • How to Work When You Just Don't Feel Like It

    The tendency to procrastinate is one of those mysteries of human nature: why put things off, when we know perfectly well that we'll have to do them eventually? Often, it's because we "just don't feel like it." But learning to do things when you don't feel like it is an essential part of being a successful, productive person -- and it's easier than you think.

  • 34 Percent of Us Work on the Weekends

    If you're reading this at work right now, you're not alone: according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Time Use Survey, 34 percent of employed people are at work on the weekends, as opposed to 83 percent on week days.

  • Who Finds Love at Work?

    We spend the bulk of our waking hours at the office, so it's not surprising that many people wind up dating someone at work -- at least for a while. Nine percent of people even wind up marrying a co-worker. If you're looking for love this Valentine's Day, where you work and where you live both matter, when it comes to upping your odds.

  • How to Negotiate Your Salary (Without Being a Jerk)

    Most recruiters expect candidates to negotiate their starting salary, but 41 percent of us don't, losing out on hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of a lifetime. And why don't we negotiate? Well, in part, because we want to seem nice -- at the very least, nice enough to keep the job offer.

  • 3 Tips to Position Yourself for a Promotion

    If you're angling for a promotion, it's not enough to work hard and do your job well. Here's how to improve your chances.