• Making the 6 Seconds the Recruiter Spends on Your Resume Count
    According to a study released by The Ladders, an online job-matching service, recruiters spend an average of six seconds reviewing an individual resume. So what are they actually looking for, and what will get your CV through that six-second window?
  • Why Care About College ROI? 3 Words: Student Loan Debt

    Earlier this year, President Obama sent a handwritten apology to University of Texas art historian Ann Collins Johns, after saying in a speech that students could "make a lot more, potentially, with skilled manufacturing or the trades than they might with an art history degree." While it's true that the value of education goes far beyond employment, in an era when 71 percent of college seniors carry student loan debt, with an average of $29,400 per borrower, it's impossible to talk about higher education without bringing up the potential return on investment that specific majors and schools offer.

  • San Francisco Demonstrates What Happens When We Raise The Minimum Wage
    Over the past 15 years, the city of San Francisco has given us evidence of what happens when we raise the pay and benefits of low-wage workers. Is it doom and destruction or the city of Oz?
  • BLS Jobs Report: Economy Added 192,000 Jobs in March, Unemployment Unchanged

    Private sector employment surpassed its 2008 peak for the first time, but the 192,000 added jobs and flat unemployment rate of 6.7 were slightly below economists' expectations. A Bloomberg survey prior to today's news release from the labor department predicted a gain of 200,000 jobs and a slight dip in unemployment to 6.6 percent.

  • Is Sleep Deprivation Endangering Your Job?
    Every Friday afternoon, colleagues across the country gather together for happy hour, ready to forget about the week with a drink. While most of these people likely won't return to their desk until Monday, what would happen if they had to go back to work afterward -- and their bosses expected their work to be just as coherent and clear as if it was Monday morning at 10 a.m.? It turns out, not getting enough sleep is almost as bad for work performance as imbibing.
  • 3 Tips for Your Very First Resume

    For folks who've been in the work world a long time, their first resume is but a misty memory of unfortunate font choices and unnecessary objectives. But for those who are first starting out, the idea of pulling together a visual representation of their still-fledgling career, with all its hopes and dreams and well, lack of concrete experience, is somewhat daunting, to say the least.

  • College ROI: STEM Degrees Still Dominated by Male Students

    Unsurprisingly, majoring in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) field is strongly correlated with a high return on investment in your college degree. And therein lies one of the main reasons for the gender wage gap: women are far less likely to choose STEM majors than men, and more likely to change majors to a non-STEM field.

  • Which States Tip the Best and Worst?
    For tipped employees, the generosity of the public may mean the difference between buying a steak or asking the landlord for an extension on the rent. And some tipped employees rely on tips more than others, because in some states it is legal to pay tipped employees a couple of bucks an hour. When we compare tipping practices from state to state, we find some pretty strange results.
  • 3 Ways to Get the Boss on Your Side

    Love them or hate them, our bosses are a huge factor in our happiness and success at work. That's bad news if yours doesn't seem to be in your corner, and while there's nothing you can do to make a terrible manager into a fantastic one, there are a few things you can try to get your boss invested in you.

  • Interactive Map: Ethnicity, Graduation Rates, and College ROI

    College graduation rates are on the rise among students who identify as Black, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native, according to The National Center for Education Statistics. In fact, in 2009-2010, over 27 percent of all bachelor's degrees were awarded to students who did not identify as White.

  • 4 New Rules for a New Era of Job Searching

    The job market for 2014 continues to become more competitive. The right education and skills are not enough to land a good job, because all the other applicants also have the right education and skills. So what can you do to increase your chances of not just getting an interview, but getting hired?

  • ADP Jobs Report: Economy Added 191,000 Jobs in March

    Economists predicted that today's employment report from payroll processing company ADP would reflect 189,000 jobs. The actual number, just north of that, might be a sign that our long, cold winter is finally over.

  • Women: To Get a Raise, Try Harder, But Also Softer (Never Mind, Just Be a Man)

    The gender wage gap might be partly explained by women opting into lower-paying professions, but when it comes to negotiating a raise in the career of your choice, a recent New York Times article seems to suggest, your biggest obstacle might be that your boss is a sexist jerk.

  • The 10 Public Colleges and Universities With the Highest ROI

    Public colleges and universities often get short shrift when people talk about the value of higher education. That's because it's so easy to be seduced by the brand-name of an ivy-covered institution of higher learning. But when it comes to getting the highest earning power for your tuition dollar -- and a top-drawer education, to boot -- you can't do better than these schools.

  • New Gadget Might Finally Solve Workplace Arguments About Heat
    Ever worked in an office in which you're always sitting at your desk layered in sweaters, even when the temperature outside is a balmy 72 degrees, because the air conditioning is set so low it feels like winter? If so, you're not alone. In fact, this problem is so prevalent in offices that a team of MIT students have developed a new wearable called Wristify, designed to make you feel warmer or cooler in your own environment by exploiting two basic properties of human temperature perception.
  • Should You Play That April Fools' Day Prank at the Office?

    April Fools' Day has been with us since long before Jim Halpert first suspended Dwight Schrute's stapler in Jello (or, if you're a fan of the original, Tim Canterbury suspended Gareth Keenan's stapler in jelly). And while the best April Fools' Day pranks help everyone blow off steam and regain access to their office equipment in record time, the worst waste time, money, and patience in an environment where all three are in short supply. In short: to prank or not to prank?

  • Why Do Graduates Leave Their State?
    Public colleges and universities rely heavily on state funding in order to offer affordable classes to their student body. However, in some states, that same student body leaves after graduation, essentially causing the public system of higher education to invest in the workforce for other states. The reasons for this are complex and surprising; it certainly requires more than a quick fix.
  • New Research Shows That Happy Workers Work Harder

    Experiments at the University of Warwick in the UK showed that happiness makes people approximately 12 percent more productive, according to research that will soon be published in the Journal of Labor Economics. In addition, researchers said, lower happiness -- caused by "major real world shocks" like bereavement or illness in the family -- was associated with lower productivity.

  • #PayChat: Examining the Value of a College Degree
    These days, many people question the value of a college education. Is it worth the cost, and how should the value of a college degree be measured?
  • The Skills Gap Might Be a 'Zombie Idea'

    The popular theory is that there's a "skills gap," a wide gulf between those looking for a job and the necessary know-how and certification that employers require. This trope has become a fixture in most media coverage of the economy and the plight of the long-term unemployed. Today, in a New York Times op ed, Paul Krugman explains why it just might be nonsense.