• #MondayMotivation: 5 Ways to Fool Yourself Into Getting Stuff Done
    Maybe you hop out of bed on Monday mornings with a song in your heart and a to-do list already coalescing in your brain. If so, don't be hurt if your co-workers avoid you until they've had their second cup of coffee. For many of us, the transition back into the work week is rough, to say the least. Whether the weekend was full of chores or fun, switching back to office mode is a challenge. Sometimes, the only answer is to play little tricks on ourselves, in order to make work happen.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Your LinkedIn Profile Helping Other People Get Hired?
    Recruiters do not care about you. OK, that sounds harsh. A better way of putting it might be, "Recruiters care about finding stellar candidates, which may or may not include you." The goal when you're buffing up your LinkedIn profile is to make sure that it's driving recruiters toward you, and not toward your friends and colleagues. In this week's roundup, we look at expert advice that will help you tighten up the leaks in your Linkedin, plus how to deal with a toxic work environment, and which questions to ask in order to start off a new job on the right foot.
  • Take Note, Kanye West: These 3 Jobs Should Totally Exist (and Pay $1 Billion)
    If you spend any time on Twitter – or anywhere online – you probably know that Kanye West recently asked Mark Zuckerberg for a billion-dollar investment in "Kanye West ideas." Jimmy Kimmel pointed out the most obvious flaw in this plan, which is that it's not such a great idea to pitch the inventor of Facebook on Twitter, but there's another small fly in the ointment, as well: from an investment perspective, Kanye appears to be saying that Yeezy Industries is worth more than Snapchat's $486 million funding round, one of the highest in history. And, needless to say, there are no jobs that pay $1 billion year. But maybe there should be.
  • Taylor Swift's Grammys Speech Is Good Career Advice for Young Women
    Forget music; Taylor Swift's biggest accomplishment might be inspiring her young, female fans not only to achieve their dreams, but to take credit for their accomplishments – and ignore the haters who try to diminish their success. Last night at the Grammys, Swift delivered perhaps the best response to Kanye West's claim that he "made that [insert sexist slur here] famous" by asserting her right to be recognized for her achievements ... and not even mentioning Yeezy by name.
  • 15 Presidential Quotes to Inspire You at Work
    In 239 years of our nation's history, there have only been 43 U.S. presidents, which makes "president" arguably the hardest job in the country to get. (Despite what it might feel like, when you're waiting for an email from a hiring manager for a decidedly non-presidential role.) Unsurprisingly, the people who make it to the highest office in the land often have some pretty strong ideas about what it takes to succeed. In honor of Washington, Lincoln, and all the rest, here are 15 quotes to inspire you to greater heights of productivity, determination, and success.
  • Scalia's Passing Likely Means Public-Sector Unions Survive to Fight Again
    Prior to the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court seemed poised to limit the rights of unions to charge non-union members "agency" or "fair share" fees covering the costs of collective bargaining. Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, which came before the Court in January, was by all accounts headed for a 5-4 decision against the unions. Now, with Scalia's death, the vote will likely be split – and revert to the lower court's decision.
  • Who's Finding Romance at Work?
    Maybe it's because they don't need to flirt in the office when they have a million apps that can connect them with the potential love of their life, but Millennials are the least likely to date someone at work, according to Vault's recently released 2016 Office Romance Survey. The survey showed that 44 percent of Millennials (ages 18 to 34) had engaged in an office romance, while 59 percent of Gen X and 66 percent of Baby Boomers had done so. Of course, the explanation could always be as simple as time spent: the older you are, the more time you've had to fall in love with your cubicle neighbor.
  • Is Hillary Clinton Right That Americans Haven't Had a Raise in 15 Years?
    During last night's Democratic presidential debate in Milwaukee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said, "I know a lot of Americans are angry about the economy. And for good cause. Americans haven't had a raise in 15 years. There aren't enough good-paying jobs, especially for young people. And yes, the economy is rigged in favor of those at the top." Rigged economy aside, was she correct in saying that Americans haven't seen an increase in pay since the turn of the last century?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Beat the Resume Robots and Get Hired
    Before your resume ever reaches human eyes, it has to make it through the Applicant Tracking System, the software program that scans your CV and decides whether you make it to the people part of the hiring process. Understanding how these Applicant Tracking Systems work might mean the difference between getting that first interview and twiddling your thumbs while your resume languishes in the depths of a database. In this week's roundup, we get an inside look at these resume robots, plus learn about time management personality types and find out one reason why your last meeting was a bust.
  • 3 Facts You Don't Know About #WomeninSTEM
    You know that STEM jobs are heavily male-dominated, and also – generally speaking – high-paying, high-growth occupations. The lack of representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math jobs is one reason why the gender pay gap persists. You've probably also heard that tech companies are trying various things to create a more diverse workforce, in terms of hiring and promoting women and people of color, from Slack's plan to build tools that catch inequities early on to Salesforce's $3 million commitment to closing its internal gender pay gap. But there's a lot you don't know about the history and current state of women in tech, in particular. Today, on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, let's take a look at some very nontrivial trivia.
  • Is a Lack of Leisure Time Holding You Back in Your Career?
    More American women are working full-time, but that doesn't mean that their family lives have caught up. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in households with children under 6, moms put in an hour of physical childcare per day, while dads did 23 minutes. The chore breakdown was similarly unequal; on an average day, women spent 47 more minutes per day on household activities like food prep and laundry. Why is this a big deal? Well, in addition to making it harder for women to put in extra time at the office and get ahead at work, lack of leisure time means less room for creativity and innovation.
  • Why Your Employer Probably Didn't Have a Super Bowl Ad
    Well over 100 million people watch the Super Bowl each year, and not all are football fans. Some of us are just there for the dip, the excuse to have a party, and yes, the commercials. But, at up to $5 million for a 30-second spot, air time during the big game isn't exactly cheap. As a result, we see a lot of commercials from mega-companies selling soda and beer and pharmaceuticals, and not much from small businesses. (Fun exception: Death Wish Coffee, the nine-person coffee company that won Intuit's Small Business Big Game contest.) What does this mean to you? Well, for one thing, you probably won't see your employer's logo pop up during the Super Bowl, unless your bosses get tickets, deck themselves out in corporate swag, and photobomb the TV cameras.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: To Be a Strong Leader, Embrace Vulnerability
    When is strength actually a weakness? When it's a facade of toughness, rather than the real deal. This special kind of workplace machismo can keep leaders from asking questions, and when it does, real problems result, both for companies and for the individual who's trying so hard to project strength. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to embrace vulnerability, plus how to get along better with co-workers, and the big mistakes you're probably making on social media, right now.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 151,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Dips to 4.9 Percent
    The monthly Employment Situation Summary, released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed the addition of 151,000 jobs to public and private, non-farm payrolls, and an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, the lowest in eight years. Prior to the release, economists were predicting the addition of 190,000 jobs. In a mixed report, however, the real good news is wage growth.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 205,000 Jobs in January
    The ADP National Employment Report beat expectations again this month, reflecting the addition of 205,000 jobs to private payrolls from December to January, according to the payroll processor. Prior to the release of the report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting average gains of 195,000 jobs.
  • How to Escape Your Own Personal Career Groundhog Day
    Punxsutawney Phil says it's going to be an early spring, and if you heard that in Bill Murray's voice, you are old. Just kidding, youthful Bill Murray superfans – you don't need to have seen Groundhog Day in the theater to appreciate its message. In fact, the movie is such a classic, it was deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant by the United States National Film Registry in 2006, and selected for preservation. What about the film strikes a chord, even 23 years after its release? Well, if you've ever had a terrible job, you probably relate to Murray's character, Phil Connors, a self-absorbed weatherman who's stuck repeating the same day over and over again.
  • #MondayMotivation: 5 Quick and Easy Changes to Boost Productivity This Week
    Last week, you said you'd do everything differently, starting today – start exercising before work, cross those lingering to-dos off your list for good, begin learning that new skill that will take your career to the next level. Now it's Monday, and you're thoroughly unprepared to do any of those things. What happened? Well, for starters, you might be thinking too big, especially for a Monday.
  • Obama Plans to Fight the Gender Pay Gap With Data
    Exactly seven years ago today, President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, amending the Civil Rights Act to alter the statute of limitations for discrimination claims. It was the first bill he signed into law as president, and an important tool for women fighting to close the gender pay gap. Today, Obama extends those protections by announcing a new rule to require companies with 100 or more employees to furnish the government with pay data on gender, race, and ethnicity.
  • Is Obamacare 'the Biggest Job-Killer in This Country'?
    During last night's seventh Republican debate, Sen. Ted Cruz said: "... we have seen now in six years of Obamacare that it has been a disaster. It is the biggest job-killer in this country. Millions of Americans have lost their jobs, have been forced into part-time work, have lost their health insurance, have lost their doctors, have seen their premiums skyrocket." If elected, he said, he would "repeal every word of Obamacare" – which would be a worthy goal, if Obamacare were really the job-killer Cruz claims it is. But is it?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Your Phone Hurting Your Career?
    Picture your last meeting: it probably involved a lot of people staring at their mobile devices, and not many people engaging with the speaker. Worse, our device addiction has spread outside the confines of the conference room. People now look at their phones while they're supposedly having conversations with clients and colleagues. All of this is rude, of course, but more importantly, it's an attention-killer. After a few years of checking your phone every couple of minutes, it's hard to even remember how to entertain yourself or focus on anything. In today's roundup, we look at a few rules to keep your smartphone and other devices from taking over your life; plus, why someone else got promoted instead of you, and 20 affirmations that will appeal even to people who hate affirmations.

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