• Why We Need to End the 'All or Nothing' Mentality About Working Mothers
    If you're rolling your eyes at yet another working mother post, then you're the exact person who needs to be reading this the most. You, like most of society, sigh with annoyance that working moms are at it again, whining about how hard it is to succeed in a career because corporate America won't let you play with its toys. This article isn't here to prove you wrong or convince you that the Earth is flat -- its purpose is to ask that you step back from your conventional ideals and ask yourself, "Am I part of the problem, too?"
  • Warning to Job Seekers: The Commuter You Just Flipped Off Might Be the Hiring Manager
    It's every job seeker's worst nightmare. A man is running late on the way to a job interview, nervous, and he bumps into some guy boarding a crowded commuter train. He blows up, uses an incredibly rude expletive, and spends the rest of the time on the commute trying to calm down. Upon arriving at the interview, he and the hiring manager recognize each other -- the hiring manager is the guy he insulted earlier this morning.
  • The Gender Wage Gap Begins During Childhood
    America's gender wage gap is still a huge problem and even an international embarrassment. It's no wonder the topic has been coming up so much lately. But now, some especially startling data is rising to the surface about just how early the discrepancy begins.
  • Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is: Women and Money Talks
    A new study finds that women are more likely to discuss medical issues and other taboo topics with others than talk about money matters. We’ll examine the reasons why women are so tight-lipped about talking dollars and cents, despite their keen financial habits.
  • Teeny-Tiny Is the New Trend in Office Space
    It seems that if you want some room to stretch while you work, you may be better off in a prison cell than a modern workspace. Mother Jones reports that, soon enough, supermax prisoners will have more leg room that office workers.
  • 5 Takeaways From One Teacher’s Social Media Experiment for Her Students
    One Minnesota high school teacher, Michelle Van Bibber of Stewartville High School, decided to teach her students a valuable lesson about over-sharing on social media and how quickly things can go viral on the Internet. The lesson learned that day is one that doesn't just apply to our younger generations -- especially, it concerns working professionals who may not be convinced that their posts could negatively affect their careers.
  • Forbes: Today's Billionaires Are Younger, 'Poorer,' More Numerous
    Bill Gates topped Forbes' 2015 billionaires list, and the other top names will look equally familiar, including Carlos Slim Helu (No. 2) and Warren Buffett (up to No. 3 this year, and the biggest gainer on the list). Elsewhere, though, the list contained plenty of shakeups and new faces.
  • How the Great Recession Changed Millennials' Lives Forever
    It's not easy to "make it" in this country on your own. Every generation has struggled to find their professional path, to gain intellectual, personal, and financial independence, and establish a life for themselves. But, there is no doubt that the latest generation to enter the workforce, the Millennials, has had an especially difficult time getting started.
  • Social Media Data Is Being Used to Calculate Student Loan Risk in the UK
    Calculating risk is a complex process, particularly in the competitive student loans market. Basing decisions on potential earnings rather than current assets and income, as banks traditionally do, makes more sense when it comes to loaning to young people. Now, some companies are turning to social media, and checking out clients' connections, in order to assess the risk of the potential borrower, and also to put pressure on those who default.
  • Who Is Late to Work and Why?
    In a recent self-reported survey, 19 percent of Americans admitted to being late for work at least once per week, if not more often -- that is almost one in five working people. Forty-eight percent, or just under half, claimed to never be late for work. The question is, who are the chronically late folks, and why do they have so much trouble getting into the office?
  • Job Training Funds Go to Workers Who Need It Least
    A recent Georgetown University report on employee training trends and spending claims that the least experienced American workers are often the ones who ironically receive the least postsecondary job training from employers and educational institutions. "Employer training trends to be for the most experienced and most educated employees," summarizes lead author Anthony Carnevale of the study's revelations.
  • 'Women Make Better Leaders,' Says Research (and Mr. Wonderful of Shark Tank)
    "Women make better CEOs." These fine words come from none other than Kevin O'Leary, better known as Mr. Wonderful on ABC's The Shark Tank. O'Leary holds an impressive business portfolio, and 55 percent of the CEOs in it are women. Why, then, are women so exceedingly underrepresented in high-level, leadership positions still to this day? One ongoing study examined just that.
  • 5 Inappropriate Workplace Touching Lessons From Joe Biden
    Maybe you're a hugger, or a back-slapper, or -- in your personal life -- a terrible flirt. Chances are, you know that none of this behavior will fly in the office, no matter how innocent your intentions. No one wants to be referred to HR for remedial training or, worse, lose their jobs because they didn't get the memo that it's 2015, and co-workers don't touch each other. In this, we are probably more with the program than many of our leaders in Washington. Take, for example, America's touchy-feeler-in-chief, Joe Biden.
  • Meet the YouTube Millionaires
    Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)
  • 5 Career Lessons Learned From Jon Stewart's Departure
    Jon Stewart's announcement came as quite a surprise to many. Many of his fans felt sincere, deep, and personal sadness; many also felt confused and shocked. Why would someone leave their career when it's seemingly at its peak?
  • 13 Incredible Company Perks
    From fledgling tech start-ups to household-name corporations, employers both big and small are continuously upping the ante when it comes to finding ways to keep their workers happy. While unusually cool perks like Etsy's playground-esque open lofts, or simply invaluable incentives such as the unlimited vacation days offered at Gravity Payments (that's right -- unlimited) might not be the deciding factor in someone's decision to accept a job, they can certainly be a factor. Smart employers know this, and make a point to incorporate additional takeaways into a job offer (besides the opportunity of employment itself). From onsite "Kegerators" to employer-subsidized egg freezing for female employees (seriously), here's a rundown of some of the most interesting perks* currently satisfying employees and enticing potential hires.
  • Working Moms Are Still Getting the Short End of the Stick
    Let's face the facts: being a working mother is exhausting and, oftentimes, completely defeating. Many women put their own career and life aspirations on hold to raise children, but very few of these ladies actually speak openly about the endless struggles they face on a daily basis. Here are the facts that you should know about the realities of working mothers and what you can do to help.
  • #SOTU 2015: Middle-Class Economics and Expanding Opportunity
    "The shadow of crisis has passed," said President Obama, in last night's State of the Union address. "And the state of the union is strong." While receiving standing ovations for job numbers (and getting in an ad-libbed dig at Republicans about winning the presidency), Obama outlined a vision for the country that focused on middle-class growth.
  • State Legislators Attempt to Shut Down Paid Sick Leave for Pennsylvania Workers
    In December of 2014, a task force in Philadelphia that was formed to study the issue of the benefits and pitfalls of paid sick leave came to its conclusion: Paid sick leave is necessary. Now, two Pennsylvania state senators are announcing their intent to propose legislation to preemptively prohibit mandatory paid sick leave for employees. Two steps forward, three steps back.
  • Unemployment Is Down, So Where Are the Wages?
    If you've been waiting for a fatter paycheck to find you in 2015, so far the news has been discouraging. Unemployment rates are down, which is exciting news, but we still haven't seen an improvement in wages. Here's why a lower unemployment rate hasn't translated to higher pay -- yet.