• How Not to Respond to a LinkedIn Request

    Job bank head Kelly Blazek is working with a reduced social media presence these days, after a rejection she sent in response to a LinkedIn connection request went viral.

  • The Sometimes Surprising Truth About the Value of the Minimum Wage

    The real value of the minimum wage is going down. Ten different charts on two different websites paint the same picture of how the relative value of the minimum wage has declined over time. In short, when you take inflation and cost of living data into account, minimum-wage workers can buy less for their earnings than they could a few years ago.

  • Are Prevailing Wage Laws Discriminatory?
    If you work as a contractor on projects with federal funding, prevailing wage laws may be pertinent to your rate of pay. An opinion piece published in the Albuqurque Journal makes the argument that "prevailing wage" laws are discriminatory. Understand what these laws say and how they affect you.
  • Well, at Least Your CEO Is Doing OK

    While many of us consider unemployment numbers and whether jobs will be available, hope long-term unemployment benefits are extended, or root for an increase in the minimum wage, there is, of course, at least one person in most companies who seems to be doing OK -- the CEO. In fact, you may be surprised how OK they really are.

  • It's Time Once Again for 'How Not to Do a Conference Call'

    AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has done it again: during a conference call to explain changes to staffers' 401(k) plans, he mentioned that some of the cost was because two AOL-ers had "distressed babies" in 2013.

  • 3 Things Employers Won't Tell You About Social Media
    By now, we've all heard stories about people being fired for their social media use, either because they got caught tweeting on the company time, or because they said something outside of work, that tarnished their employer's brand. But there's more to the perils of social media than just saying the wrong thing at the wrong time. Here's what your employer knows about social media that might surprise you.
  • Work at Home? Here's How to Avoid an Audit
    The Consumerist has a helpful list of tax tips to follow to avoid being audited by the IRS. Some of these sage pieces of advice are relevant to people who work at home, or who run home-based businesses. If you work at home, take heed of these three things when reporting your income.
  • Your Favorite Football Team Might Be Guilty of Wage Theft
    Whether you're a fan of the Raiders or some other football team, the abuses alleged in the recent class-action lawsuit filed in Alameda County Superior Court may be more common than the football industry cares to admit. The suit alleges not only the usual wage theft violations such as no overtime pay, but a laundry list of patronizing and insulting, not to mention illegal, requirements that would cause any feminist to wonder at our lack of progress over the last century.
  • What the State of the Union Means to You

    Last night, President Obama called for 2014 to be a "year of action," asking Congress work with him to raise the minimum wage, extend unemployment benefits, and make better educational opportunities available to all Americans. In the meantime, the president has acted alone, issuing executive orders, directing government bodies under his control, and creating teams of private and public citizens. But those tactics will only go so far, if Congress won't act.

  • Who Wants to Raise the Minimum Wage? The Answer May Surprise You
    Is raising the federal minimum wage rate beneficial to the economy or not? We'll take a look at who's for and against raising the wage and how level of education affects people's opinions.
  • New Worker Co-ops Lead to Economic Prosperity

    The newest incarnation of worker cooperatives are worker self-directed enterprises (WSDE). WSDEs combine aspects of capitalism and socialism, resulting in an improved version of a centuries-old idea. Not only do the workers decide together when and how much to produce, but they themselves choose, via a democratic process, how to use the enterprise's net revenue. Suddenly, government agencies dependent upon enterprise tax payments become dependent not upon the CEOs, but on the workers themselves.

  • New Book Says Working Moms Can Have Their Cake and Eat It Too
    Going back to work after having a child can be a tough decision for many working mothers, because they fear motherhood means their careers have to suffer. A new book shows working that parenting and career success aren’t mutually exclusive.
  • Does Your State Want to Raise the Minimum Wage?

    PayScale's recent survey indicates which state populations are in favor of raising the minimum wage to a full $15 per hour. Do you live in a state that is fighting to raise the minimum wage?

  • 3 Businesses That Are Booming in Colorado, Thanks to Legalized Marijuana

    There's a new gold rush in Colorado, thanks to new laws legalizing marijuana for recreational use. And just as the businesses that supplied the miners in the first gold rush often struck it rich, the businesses that support the marijuana industry are doing almost as well as the dispensaries themselves.

  • Apple Vows to Diversify Its Board With More Women
    Apple currently only has one female board member, Andrea Jung, former CEO of Avon Products, Inc., on its eight-member, all-white and male-dominant board of directors. Recently, however, the company announced that it was taking steps to change that.
  • The Embarrassing State of Parental Leave in the US
    American working parents continue to get the short end of the stick when it comes to parental leave. We'll take a look at how this troubling reality has grave effects for parents and, especially, the US economy.
  • For the First Time, Half of Members of Congress Are Millionaires

    Last week, unemployment benefits expired for over a million Americans. Also, a report revealed that over 50.1 percent of Congress are millionaires.

  • 3 Reasons Why Working People Need a Welfare State
    What would happen if the welfare state in America was eliminated? That's the question that a Quora user recently asked. Many of the answers serve as reminders of the self-serving reasons why we should contribute to a social safety net.

  • BLS Jobs Report: Economy Added Only 74,000 Jobs in December

    Economists predicted an addition of more than 190,000 jobs for December 2013, which makes today's Employment Situation Report unexpected bad news. Total non-farm employment increased by just 74,000 jobs in December, bringing the yearly average per month up to 182,000 per month -- identical to 2012's numbers. Unemployment, meanwhile, dropped to 6.7 percent, a new five-year low. So what's going on?

  • We Are Free to Exploit You
    Those who would like to dismantle labor unions are on the attack. As more states consider enacting right to work laws, people on both sides of the argument are disseminating information and misinformation in an attempt to rally others to their cause. It's too easy to lose sight of the forest for the trees. It's good to know who is behind efforts to disable unions and what their full agenda is.