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  • 3 Life-Saving Tips for Going Over the Boss's Head

    Going over the boss's head is not fun and can have consequences. If you are drowning in a sea of incompetent management, use these life-saving tips to stay afloat.
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  • House of Curves: Is it Friendship Before Business or the Other Way Around?

    The WeTV reality series House of Curves, follows full-figured fashion designer Kenyatta Jones on her journey from boutique biz to major player. Under her Bella Rene label, Kenyatta produces sexy dresses, fitted power suits and trendy casual clothes for younger, full-figured women.
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  • Does Someone Have to Go: Personal Feelings Trump Business Decisions

    Last week on Does Someone Have to Go, the employees of True Home Value were faced with three tough decisions including whether or not to fire an employee with a drinking problem. This week, three employees had to stand in front of their peers and plead to keep their jobs. Time to see how it all turned out.
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  • What Will Happen to Paula Deen's Employees?

    When you're looking for jobs, the company brand is almost as important as the position's title, pay, and responsibilities. Ideally, you want to find your dream gig at a brand other people will recognize and have positive associations with. At the very least, it makes for a shorter explanation in job interviews down the road. In the wake of the allegations of racism against Paula Deen, we look at what happens to a company's employees after an organization winds up with egg all over its public face.

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  • Does Someone Have to Go: DFX Decides

    Last week on Does Someone Have to Go, we met the employees of DFX. The 30-year-old fitness equipment company has been having a hard time since founder Tom sold the company to his daughter Farren. Why? Mostly because Tom stayed on, micromanaging every employee with the help of surveillance cameras.
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  • California Might Fine Wal-Mart $6,000 for Each Underpaid Employee

    It's no secret that many large companies make profits in part by keeping their labor costs down -- a move that puts a burden on taxpayers, who are then forced to make up the deficit by paying for Medicare, food stamps, and other assistance programs, as Rick Unger on Forbes.com points out. In fact, a recent report by the Democratic staff of the U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce found that Wal-Mart's low wages could be costing taxpayers $5,815 per employee -- and as a result, the State of California is considering legislation that would fine the retailer $6,000 for every underpaid employee.

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  • Coca-Cola Steps up -- or Does It?

    Coca-Cola is pledging to stop marketing to children under the age of 12, and to fund exercise programs in countries in which they do business. Will it do any good?
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  • How Google Continues to Keep Employees Happy

    Working for Google is a dream of many, not just because of what this company has achieved in the last 15 years, but because of its enviable work culture. With 37,000 employees in 40 countries, you might wonder how Google maintains a motivating work experience throughout its entire company.

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  • CVS Asks Employees to Share Data About Weight, Health -- or Pay a Fine

    Starting May 1, all employees of CVS will have to agree to report their weight, body fat, and blood glucose levels or pay $50 more per month for their employee-sponsored health insurance.

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  • How Google's Cafeteria Keeps Employees Healthy

    When it comes to perks, Google's the gold standard. If you work at Google, your day is a sea of nap pods and free cereal and independent projects. (And, OK, probably some work in there, too. Google employees tend to put in long days.) But there's perhaps no greater fringe benefit than Google's cafeteria, where the gourmet food is unlimited, locally farmed, and culturally diverse.

    It's also a trick, sort of. In addition to encouraging Googlers to work those longer hours, the free food the company offers is specially designed to be as healthy as possible. The thought, of course, is that healthy food will equal healthy employees, which saves health care costs and prevents absenteeism.

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  • The $99,000 Burrito

    When we have a team lunch to celebrate the latest site release, someone always suggests/insists upon going to Chipotle. Why? Because it's delicious, of course. Cilantro-lime rice is addictive, it would seem. According to this article from CBS, these tasty burritos can also be lucrative. So how are Chipotle employees earning the whole $99K enchilada?

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  • The 50 Best Employers in America

    The equation seems impossible, at first glance. love(job) + paycheck(high) = X? It's got to be a trick question. But wait! Not so! Business Insider teamed up with PayScale to solve for X and it turns out, X = employers(awesome). With the scary math behind us, we can turn our attention to this list of the 50 best employers

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  • Facebook and Zynga Break Up

    Facebook and Zynga just changed their business relationship status to Single. Last week, the companies went their separate ways, and independent game developers stand to benefit from the breakup.

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  • Target Set to Hire Fewer Seasonal Workers This Year

    It's no surprise that this season is a boon for retailers, but Target is remaining cautious when it comes to bringing on seasonal workers. The discounter recently said that it planned on hiring 2,000 to 12,000 fewer seasonal employees this year compared to 2011.

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  • LivingSocial to Lay Off 400 Employees

    Mashable is reporting that daily deals site LivingSocial has plans to lay off 400 employees from its team in the U.S., citing the Washington Business Journal's source "with knowledge of the daily deal giant's plans." The news comes just two years after LivingSocial raised over $800 million in funding, including $175 million from Amazon.

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  • Why Stores Shouldn't Force Retail Employees to Work on Holidays

    For many of us, Black Friday came early this year, thanks to stores like Walmart and Toys R Us who decided to open up early, on Thursday night instead of the usually crack of Friday morning. But what about the employees who had to work on Thanksgiving? Turns out, many of them were less than thrilled to go face the crowds from the other side of the register so soon after dinner.

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  • Modria Helps Companies Solve Customer Complaints

    Modria is a new startup that hopes to help client companies solve disputes and customer complaints with its signature software. It's co-founded by a pair of former eBay and PayPal employees -- Colin Rule and Chittu Nagarajan -- and is based on the very system those companies use to handle customer issues.

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  • Apple Blue Sky Program Gives Employees Time to Work on Passion Projects

    Google's "20 percent" rule, which enables employees to work on side projects for 20 percent of their workweek, may have a rival in the all-new Apple Blue Sky program. This program lets select Apple team members take a few weeks at a time to work on a passion project.

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  • Apple Employment Growth: 12,400 Full-Time Workers Added in the 2012 Fiscal Year

    This week, tech giant Apple filed its 10-K report with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and Mashable uncovered a key tidbit about the company's growth: it added some 12,400 full-time workers during the 2012 fiscal year. This is no doubt partially due to the 33 retail stores Apple added over the same period; today, over 42,000 employees work at Apple stores.

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  • Ben & Jerry's Becomes Certified B Corporation

    Ben & Jerry's is officially a certified B Corporation. The Unilever-acquired ice cream maker is the first subsidiary to earn this distinction, which is essentially the sustainable business equivalent to LEED certifications for green buildings.

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