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  • When It Comes to Working for the Same Company, How Long Is Too Long?

    Years ago, a colleague of mine who had held the same title for a number of years went to HR to discuss why she wasn't getting promoted.

    "People really only have your job for two years, max," she said, shrugging. "Then they leave and go somewhere else. You've been here, what six years? That's too long. I don't know what to tell you."

    Leaving aside for a moment the HR person's possible skill deficit (or at least rusty diplomatic skills) was she right?

  • 3 Totally Unexpected Work-From-Home Jobs

    When we think of work-from-home jobs, we usually picture tech types, tapping away at their keyboards, blissfully free from human interaction and its ties to the physical office. But there are plenty of other kinds of jobs out there that allow you to work from home -- and some of them will surprise you.

  • Job Seekers Who Use Social Media Are More Likely to Find Jobs

    Want to find a new job? Ask your friends. Better yet, ask your friends online.

    A recent study by the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie-Mellon University found that job seekers who use social media are more likely to find work.

  • Top 5 Jobs for Veterans

    If you could hire an employee who was already trained in his or her field, knew the value of teamwork, and was committed to getting the job done, even under the most difficult circumstances, you'd do it, right? So would major corporations across the U.S., which is one reason why so many have created special programs for recruiting veterans.

  • These 3 Appearance-Related Issues Can Keep You From Getting Hired

    Don't worry: I'm not about to tell you that there's a perfect hair length or a magical suit that all would-be hires must wear to their next job interview. However, the fact is that job interviews are (at least partially) about first impressions. So it behooves you to make sure your appearance is up to snuff before you head off to meet the person who will hopefully be your boss.

  • Is This Teen the Hardest-Working Person in America?

    Would you walk ten miles in the snow just for a shot at a minimum-wage job? Indiana teenager Jhaquell Reagan did just that, netting himself a better-paying gig, media coverage, and almost 27,000 likes on Facebook in the process.

  • 5 Tricks to Get Your Resume Past Applicant Screening Systems

    Most large companies now use screening software to filter applicant resumes. Getting your CV through the net sometimes has more to do with formatting than with the quality of your experience.

  • 3 Reasons You Didn't Get the Job

    There's nothing more frustrating than turning in the interview performance of your life, only to be told later on that you didn't get the job. In some ways, it's easier when you know what you did wrong. At least then, you can learn from your mistakes and move on.

  • 3 Crazy Resumes That Will Inspire You

    Is your resume lacking a certain oomph? Perhaps you can draw inspiration from these, er, eccentric CVs. Savvy Sugar's got nine of 'em, but these were some of our favorites.

  • 10 Networking Tips for Shy People

    Being in a room surrounded by people you don't know but want to know can be unnerving. This is especially true if you're the type of person who tends to cower from such social situations. Unfortunately for the shy types, networking is a necessary part of job-seeking and building a career in almost every profession. Here are a few tips to help ease some of your social anxiety.

  • The Anatomy of a Great Resume [infographic]

    It's time to look for a job. What do you do now? The first thing you should do -- and the most important thing you can do, according to this Top Counseling Schools infographic -- is to create the perfect resume.

  • Everyone Will Have to Become an Entrepreneur [infographic]

    At the rate that jobs are being outsourced, and with more and more companies choosing to bring in contractors instead of employees, a perfect storm is being created. That storm could result in a whole new world of entrepreneurs who could replace employees, as this Funders and Founders indicates.

  • Pros & Cons of Hiring Friends

    Most companies like to hire by referral whenever possible. Workers love it because it allows them to network their way into new jobs; organizations love it, because good workers tend to recommend other good workers. So what could possibly be the downside to all of this?

  • If These 3 Things Happen During Your Job Interview, Don't Take the Job

    During a slow economy, it's hard to turn down even the least appealing job offer. But there are a few danger signs which, if they come up during an interview, are a definite sign that you should not take the job.

  • Start Doing the Work for Tomorrow's Job Today

    You've probably heard the expression, "dress for the job you want." But how about doing the work for the job you want -- even before you get it?

  • 4 Jobs for Foodies -- Even If You Can't Cook

    Do what you love, the old adage goes, and you'll never work a day in your life. But what if what you love is food -- as in eating, but not cooking it? Is there a way to make your hobby your dream job?

  • 5 Ways to Discover True Happiness After Getting Fired

    Is it possible to be happier after you get fired? It is if you look at things from the right perspective.

  • Job Searching? Don't Forget These 3 Factors

    Looking for a job is a full-time job. No wonder, then, that many of us lose sight of our goals in the frenzy to get hired.

  • 3 Little Things About Corporate Culture That Make a Big Difference

    If you're going on a job interview in the near future, you probably already have your list of big questions to ask in order to figure out if this is the gig for you. But while you're looking at the big issues, don't forget about the little ones -- the seemingly innocuous tells that give you real insight into what it would be like to work at this place on a day-to-day basis.

  • How to Explain Gaps in Your Resume

    What's the downside to no longer being in a recession? For folks who are still out of work, it's harder than ever to explain those long periods of unemployment, even if it's not their fault. (And it very well might not be. The economy is better than it was, but it's still most charitably described as "slow.")

    The trick, writes Priscilla Claman at Harvard Business Review, is to describe your out-of-work story the right way.