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  • 3 Lessons From Ivanka Trump’s #WomenWhoWork Campaign
    Being a working woman takes on a whole new meaning in today's fast-paced, technologically advanced age. There's much more responsibility to deal with and so many more expectations to live up to when trying to juggle life and work. See how Ivanka Trump’s new #WomenWhoWork initiative aims to end the unrealistic stereotypes of working women and, instead, empower them to live authentic, successful lives.
  • Why Fear Success?

    Why Fear Success?
    It may seem completely counterintuitive, but one of the greatest obstacles to success is often fear that we may succeed. It's that petrified stagnation that prevents us from looking for another job, pursuing advancement, and even taking actions we know will bring about change. Perhaps we've become so accustomed to failure that the idea of success is unbelievable. We don't want to get our hopes up, and we may also fear the side effects that would come with success.
  • Working Moms Are Still Getting the Short End of the Stick
    Let's face the facts: being a working mother is exhausting and, oftentimes, completely defeating. Many women put their own career and life aspirations on hold to raise children, but very few of these ladies actually speak openly about the endless struggles they face on a daily basis. Here are the facts that you should know about the realities of working mothers and what you can do to help.
  • 3 Things You Don't Know About Negotiating Salary
    To compile the recently issued Salary Negotiation Guide, PayScale asked 31,000 people whether they'd ever negotiated their salary. Fifty-seven percent said they had not. Given that not negotiating salary can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of a lifetime -- and that 75 percent of people who ask get at least some kind of salary bump -- it obviously makes sense to hit the bargaining table before you accept a new job offer or let your annual review go by without initiating a discussion about money. Still reluctant? Arm yourself with the facts.
  • The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs
    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.
  • Getting Heard: 5 Tips for Meetings
    Working women, have you ever attempted to present an idea in a meeting, only to be interrupted, shut down, or ignored, seemingly based on nothing more than your gender? If so, you have experienced "speaking while female," a term coined by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant to describe women's frequent experience of having their thoughts discredited by male co-workers and bosses. While you can't singlehandedly undo generations of gender bias, there are certain things you can do to improve your chances of being heard.
  • #SOTU 2015: Middle-Class Economics and Expanding Opportunity
    "The shadow of crisis has passed," said President Obama, in last night's State of the Union address. "And the state of the union is strong." While receiving standing ovations for job numbers (and getting in an ad-libbed dig at Republicans about winning the presidency), Obama outlined a vision for the country that focused on middle-class growth.
  • #FairPayMatters: What the World Needs to Learn From the Sony vs Charlize Theron Fiasco
    If anything good came out of the Sony email hack, it's that Charlize Theron put Sony on blast for paying her $10 million less than her male co-star, Chris Hemsworth, for their upcoming film, The Huntsman. Let’s take a look at how Theron’s ballsy move (pun very much intended) is encouraging women to quit the coy act and fight for their right to earn equal pay in their careers.
  • 3 Women Making a Big Difference in Tech for Future Generations
    Studies show that women in tech are vastly underrepresented, but that's not stopping these three tech-savvy ladies from making a huge difference for future generations of techies. See how these women are using their know-how to pave a new path for a brighter and more balanced future in technology.
  • This Is What's Stopping You From Getting the Salary You Deserve
    More than half of respondents to PayScale's salary survey have never negotiated their salary, according to data gathered for our recent Salary Negotiation Guide, despite the fact that 75 percent of those who asked received a bump in pay, and 44 percent even got the entire sum they requested. Furthermore, research suggests that many of the non-negotiators consider themselves to be underpaid. So why don't people ask more often?
  • 5 At-Home Business Ideas for Stay-at-Home Parents
    Childcare is expensive, but so is opting out of your career to be a stay-at-home parent. If you want to leave the rat race, but keep investing in your professional development (and 401k), starting your own at-home business might be the answer. Becoming your own boss doesn't have to be scary -- actually, it can be enjoyable and empowering at the same time.
  • Unemployed Men Still Do Less Housework Than Women
    Possibly the only upside to being unemployed, as long as it doesn't go on too long, is finally having enough time to take care of your living space and spend time with your children, if you have them. But as The Upshot's Josh Katz recently discovered, even unemployment looks different, depending on whether you're a man or a woman.
  • Talking About Gender Stereotyping May Reinforce It
    We won't erase the gender wage gap by ignoring it, but a recent article from Sheryl Sandberg and Wharton professor Adam Grant shows that just talking about it won't be enough to solve the problem, either. In fact, discussing stereotypes might just make the problem worse, not better.
  • 5 Steps for Building Your Own Professional Website
    Whether you are a job seeker, an independent jewelry designer, a freelance journalist, an aspiring filmmaker, or the owner of a new food cart, a strong online presence is a key part of every professional and small business's marketing strategy. The backbone of this presence is your website. And unless your small business is a web design company, or you are successful enough to hire a programming whiz (in which case you would have probably already needed a website by now), you most likely have neither the funds nor skills to fork over thousands to a professional for the perfect site. Thankfully, in today's sea of freelancers, entrepreneurs, and independent contractors, a lack of money and programming knowledge does not stand in the way of a great-looking site that does not break the bank.
  • Male Professors Automatically Get Better Reviews
    In any profession, performance evaluations matter. Just as a year-end review might be utilized by management to make decisions about salary, assigned duties, and general competency, professor's assessments (including the course evaluations filled out by students) are used to make hiring, promotion, and even tenure decisions. Now, new research suggests what many have long suspected: male professors automatically receive better reviews than female professors.
  • Want to Get More Done at Work? Do Less
    Some good news for anyone sick of 12-hour days at the office: the key to maximizing professional productivity may not be to work more, but rather to work less. According to a recent study conducted by the Draugiem Group, a social networking company, the average person remains productive for 52 minutes at a time. Using its productivity tracking app, DeskTime, the Draugiem Group analyzed users' time and tasks and found that the most productive 10 percent were those who worked for 52-minute intervals followed by 17-minute breaks, over the course of a workday that often lasted fewer than eight hours.
  • 5 Reasons to Take Vacation for the Holiday
    'Tis the holiday season, which means that the people you know (and work with) are likely taking one of two approaches: They are either working more than ever; or they are taking lots of time off to be with their families and enjoy a well-deserved break. Here's the thing, though. More of us seem to be in the group of those who are working too hard and not having much fun. In fact, 40 percent of us don't take all of our vacation days each year.
  • Surprise: The US Is Terrible at Work-Life Balance
    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development recently released its biannual report ranking its member countries for work-life balance. Out of 34 countries, the U.S. came in 29th, beating Australia but trailing Poland. Turkey came in last, with 45 percent of workers pulling 50-hour weeks, and Denmark first, with about 2 percent doing the same. Get out your giant foam fingers and start up the chant: We're 29! We're 29!
  • Do Male Managers Really Need a Guide to Working Women?
    This weekend, Joanne Lipman, former deputy managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, offered a slightly different spin on the usual career advice for women hoping to finally achieve pay equity and equal opportunity in the workplace: namely, she focused on men, specifically male managers. Some commentators were less than thrilled.
  • What You Need to Know About the Gender Pay Gap
    There is a seemingly constant debate over the "wage gap" in the United States -- whether it exists, why it exists, how large it is, if it does exist. The wage gap represents the average difference in wages paid to men versus wages paid to women. You may have heard the (sometimes disputed) assertion that in the United States, women are only paid 77 cents for every dollar men are paid. The question is, how can this be true when wage discrimination is illegal, and has been for decades? Here we will provide you with a few facts about this debate so that you can draw your own conclusions.