• Take These 3 College Courses to Maximize Your Chances at a Job

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 284,000 American workers toiled for minimum wage last year, despite having a bachelor's degree. CNBC points out that this number, while significantly lower than the 327,000 overeducated minimum wage earners in 2010, is up a whopping 70 percent from 2002. To some extent, it's because today's college grads need to have more skills than previous generations, in order to impress employers.

  • Use PayScale’s Best Jobs for You Tool to Find Your Dream Job

    Choosing a job is never an easy task, whether you’re a fresh-faced student deciding on a field of study or an experienced professional thinking about your next big career move. PayScale’s new Best Jobs for You tool is here to make that decision a lot easier. This new tool allows you to comb through our immense career database to find a job that matches your preferences, experience and education levels and earns the salary you want.

  • Will Obamacare Kill 2 Million Jobs?

    Recently, the Congressional Budget Office released an updated report, which included data on the Affordable Care Act. Yesterday, several conservative commentators and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor fired off tweets, Cantor claiming that "millions of hardworking Americans will lose their jobs" because of the Affordable Care Act." So will this come to pass?

  • 3 Things Employers Won't Tell You About Social Media
    By now, we've all heard stories about people being fired for their social media use, either because they got caught tweeting on the company time, or because they said something outside of work, that tarnished their employer's brand. But there's more to the perils of social media than just saying the wrong thing at the wrong time. Here's what your employer knows about social media that might surprise you.
  • A Bachelor's Degree -- From a Community College?

    Community college used to be where students went to start their academic career, often for less money than they'd pay to attend a four-year school. If you wanted vocational training, or a degree that would transfer to another, longer program, community college was the place to start. But in California, at least, community colleges might soon offer four-year programs -- in high-demand concentrations.

  • How to Deal With Conflict When You're a Nice Person

    Everyone knows that person at the office, the one who loves conflict: he's the one who's always butting heads with everyone, engaging people from the CEO to the summer intern on everything from the quarterly report to the outcome of last week's game. And then there's you -- the nice guy. The problem is, if you're too nice to deal with conflict at all, people are going to get Mr. Blowhard's perspective a lot more than they get yours.

  • 3 Reasons Employers Aren't Hiring Recent College Grads

    The unemployment rate for the youngest members of the workforce is significantly higher than the general population -- 14.8 percent, in fact, as of November, 2013, according to the Center for American Progress, compared to the 7 percent or so we've been seeing for the general population. All indications are that Millennial workers are not recovering from the Great Recession at the same rate as other age groups. But why?

  • Work at Home? Here's How to Avoid an Audit
    The Consumerist has a helpful list of tax tips to follow to avoid being audited by the IRS. Some of these sage pieces of advice are relevant to people who work at home, or who run home-based businesses. If you work at home, take heed of these three things when reporting your income.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Economy Added 175,000 Jobs in January

    The U.S. economy added 175,000 non-farm, private sector jobs between December and January, according to the ADP National Employment Report. This is about the same as the monthly average for 2013, but lower than economists' predictions of 185,000 jobs.

  • Here's a Reason to Get a College Degree: You're More Likely to Work at Home

    Want a job that will let you work from home, at least part of the time? Better get a college degree. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that workers with a four-year degree are much more likely to be allowed to telecommute.

  • Tuesdays Are the Most Productive Day of the Week

    Feeling productive today? It might be because it's Tuesday. A recent Accountemps poll found that 33 percent of human resources managers pegged Tuesdays as the week's more productive day.

  • Are You Addicted to Stress?

    If you're one of those people who work best under pressure, there's good news and bad news. The good news is that today's stressful work environment certainly plays to your strengths. The bad news is that at least one expert thinks that it's possible to development a "neurochemical dependence" on stress. In other words, maybe you're addicted.

  • Wisconsin and the 7-Day Work Week
    Governor of Wisconsin Scott Walker has bragged that his state went from the 43rd best state in which to do business to the 17th during his tenure.That is a big improvement over the course of four short years. While business owners in Wisconsin may be enjoying an improved environment, we must ask what makes Wisconsin business-friendly, and whether those traits create an unfriendly environment for workers or residents. In the long run, what is bad for employees may also be bad for business.
  • Does Getting Rid of Titles Really Do Away With Corporate Hierarchy?

    If you haven't heard the word "holacracy" yet, you will soon. The term refers to an organization without a traditional organizational hierarchy. Gone are the titles that indicate who gives the orders and who takes them. The question is, does scrubbing titles actually create an egalitarian workplace utopia -- or will there always be bosses, regardless of how hard a company tries structure itself without them?

  • The Woman Who Quit Her Job in a Super Bowl Commercial

    Machine engineer Gwen Dean wanted to quit her job in order to start a business teaching people to make puppets. Yesterday, she did just that -- via a Super Bowl commercial for GoDaddy, the web hosting provider usually known for scantily clad spokeswomen.

  • The Incredible Shrinking Office Space [infographic]

    Office space is smaller than ever, and getting smaller still, according to research from CoreNet Global. Of the 465 companies surveyed, 24 percent said their staff had less than 100 square feet of workspace to call their own, while 40 percent said space would shrink to that level by 2017. Workspace has shrunk from 225 square feet in 2010 to 176 just four years later.

  • 3 Ways to Answer 'What Are Your Salary Expectations?'

    It's perhaps the most dreaded question of the interview process. Bid too high, and you could cut yourself out of the running entirely; bid too low, and you'll cost yourself thousands -- perhaps hundreds of thousands -- of dollars over the course of your career. So what's the right answer?

  • Radical Idea in Education Might Save Students Money
    The University of Minnesota Rochester (UMR) has implemented some radical ideas in higher education and, so far, it seems they are successful. They want to hire teachers who want to teach, and enroll students who want to learn. Sounds simple enough, although other colleges and universities sometimes fail to achieve this. The icing on the cake, so to speak, is that UMR costs less than traditional schools.
  • 5 Ways to Protect Your LinkedIn Account
    Did you know that January 28th was Data Privacy Day? If you happened to miss out on that glorious day, then now’s your chance to honor your online privacy and learn how to protect your LinkedIn account. Better late than never, folks.
  • 3 Ways to Spin Unrelated Jobs on Your Resume

    Most career paths are less super-highway than long and winding road. As a result, most of us have a few twists and turns on our resume, which can make it look like we're less committed to our present career goals than we actually are. The trick? To make those unrelated gigs work as well for us in the present as they did in the past.