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  • What Counts as Being on the Clock?
    Most people have heard of the 40-hour work week. While some European nations have shorter work weeks for employees, in many American jobs employees expect (and are entitled) to be paid overtime at a rate of one and a half times their regular hourly pay rate for every hour they work over 40 in a given work week. The Fair Labor Standards Act exempts some types of employees, like lawyers, from these requirements, but most lower-wage jobs are covered. For employees who start their tasks the minute they walk into an office and who are able to go home the minute their shift is over, figuring out what counts as "hours worked" is fairly simple. But for some folks in some kinds of job, it’s not that easy. So the question becomes, what counts as work time?
  • 5 Tips on Choosing a College: Confessions of an Art School Grad
    By now, we probably all know someone who struggles with student loan debt or job woes. Many of us young folk went to college hoping to make our dreams come true, only to find ourselves saddled with enormous debt and no job prospects. Young grads are still having trouble nailing down that first professional job, and many people aren't working in the industries they trained for. It wasn't exactly a walk in the park for older people either, whose careers went kaput and they had to go back to school or get new training. Stories from the Great Recession are many among us.
  • Why We Need to End the 'All or Nothing' Mentality About Working Mothers
    If you're rolling your eyes at yet another working mother post, then you're the exact person who needs to be reading this the most. You, like most of society, sigh with annoyance that working moms are at it again, whining about how hard it is to succeed in a career because corporate America won't let you play with its toys. This article isn't here to prove you wrong or convince you that the Earth is flat -- its purpose is to ask that you step back from your conventional ideals and ask yourself, "Am I part of the problem, too?"
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Time Management Lies, Crazy Interview Questions, and What Workers Want More Than Free Food
    If you've ever interviewed at a tech company -- or any startup -- you've probably had a hiring manager try to sell you on the value of fun perks like free food, in-office foosball, and other swag and snacks. In reality, though, these extras are worth much less than other considerations. For example, dealing with a bad boss isn't worth all the cereal General Mills will ever produce.
  • Vodafone Offers 16-Week Maternity Leave, Full Pay for Part-Time Work After
    Last week, Vodafone Group announced that it will offer 16 weeks of paid maternity leave to employees at all 30 of its companies around the world by the end of the year. In addition, returning mothers will be offered a flexible work schedule after their leave is over: for six months, they will be allowed to work 30 hours a week, while retaining their full-time salary.
  • College ROI Report: Will You Earn Enough to Pay Off Your Debt?
    Student loan debt is on the rise. In 2011, 51 percent of first-time, full-time college students had took out student loans, according to the National Center of Education Statistics, an 11 percent increase from 10 years prior. The average size of those loans also increased by 36 percent. During the same period, the country experienced one of the worst recessions in its history, offering college students fewer resources to draw on, in order to offset loans, and dimmer prospects of high-earning employment after graduation. In the latest edition of the College ROI report, PayScale examines which colleges and universities offer the best return and lowest debt load for prospective students.
  • 8 Rules for Cellphone Use at Work
    Cellphones are a part of everyday life for most of us in 2015, yet many businesses still don't have policies where their use is concerned. Even if your company has laid out some rules, there are probably still some gray areas that leave you scratching your head. These tips could help you ensure you're not stepping on any toes, or offending anyone, while allowing you to keep using your phone at work.
  • 5 Ways to Get Tough

    5 Ways to Get Tough
    We all want to be tough. It's something that was ingrained in us from an early age -- more so for boys than for girls -- but the impression we may get is that we should be able to handle everything that is thrown our way. But, what would happen if we set all that aside for a minute, and we re-evaluated what it meant to be tough? On the job, if we took a closer look at our toughness, we might just see that we've approached it in all the wrong ways.
  • Warning to Job Seekers: The Commuter You Just Flipped Off Might Be the Hiring Manager
    It's every job seeker's worst nightmare. A man is running late on the way to a job interview, nervous, and he bumps into some guy boarding a crowded commuter train. He blows up, uses an incredibly rude expletive, and spends the rest of the time on the commute trying to calm down. Upon arriving at the interview, he and the hiring manager recognize each other -- the hiring manager is the guy he insulted earlier this morning.
  • If You Want to Go Places in Your Career, Be Still
    It's frustrating to have people remind you to "stop and smell the roses" when your life seems to be going 1,000 miles per hour -- but that doesn't mean it's bad advice. Learn how taking a step back can actually help you move forward in your life and your career.
  • The Gender Wage Gap Begins During Childhood
    America's gender wage gap is still a huge problem and even an international embarrassment. It's no wonder the topic has been coming up so much lately. But now, some especially startling data is rising to the surface about just how early the discrepancy begins.
  • Religious Discrimination at Work: What Are the Rules?
    Religious discrimination is one area of discrimination that is often mentioned in the news, yet is a very complex and abstract topic. Particularly where one individual’s religious beliefs conflict with another individual's exercise of his or her rights, the subject area can become confusing. That is why it is important for employees to understand what their employers are and are not allowed to do when it comes to religious discrimination.
  • Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is: Women and Money Talks
    A new study finds that women are more likely to discuss medical issues and other taboo topics with others than talk about money matters. We’ll examine the reasons why women are so tight-lipped about talking dollars and cents, despite their keen financial habits.
  • Mapping College ROI: Payscale's 2015 College ROI Report by State
    No doubt, there is more to be gained from college than just a good job. People are always giving college students advice about how to maximize this invaluable experience. But, these days, it pays to be practical as well. Soaring student loan debt is crippling graduates, their parents, and the economy. Payscale's College ROI report was created to help students and families factor in ROI data when selecting a college.
  • Teeny-Tiny Is the New Trend in Office Space
    It seems that if you want some room to stretch while you work, you may be better off in a prison cell than a modern workspace. Mother Jones reports that, soon enough, supermax prisoners will have more leg room that office workers.
  • 5 Ways to Survive Work-at-Home Hell
    Most workers work from home occasionally at some point in their career, and some of us do it on a full-time basis. After all, if you've telecommuted at all, you know how your home-based environment can dramatically improve your productivity. Distractions are limited, and you're able to focus on the project at hand. So, why do some companies forbid, discourage, or in other ways inhibit their workers from telecommuting? In short, it's because there's also a downside to working from home.
  • 3 Ways to Recognize a Terrible Potential Boss in an Interview
    Have you ever been so psyched for a landing a job interview at a promising employer, only to be completely turned off to the opportunity thanks to the behavior of your potential boss? It happens more often than candidates like to admit, which is why it's important to be able to recognize a bad boss when you meet one. Here's how.
  • 5 Reasons You Need Friends at Work
    Considering how much time we spend on the job, it's kind of amazing that becoming friends with the people we work with is still somewhat controversial. Some feel that it is best to fully separate our personal and professional lives, but more people are starting to intentionally blur these lines in a lot of ways, including becoming close friends with people at the office. If you enjoy what you do, (or even if you don't), it can feel unnatural to turn away from potential on-site friendships. And, why should you anyway? Here are some reasons why you actually need friends at work, and how those friendships can support you both personally and professionally.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup:  Kickstart Your Workday, Career Lessons at Age 23, and Why Cover Letters Still Exist
    How do you start your workday? If you, like many of us, are generally a little bit late, it could be by grabbing the caffeinated beverage of your choice and hurriedly scanning your inbox. But maybe it's time for a reboot.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 295,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Falls to 5.5 Percent
    Economists predicted gains of 240,000 jobs for February, but this morning's release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics beat expectations with 295,000 jobs added, and an unemployment rate that declined 0.2 points to 5.5 percent -- the lowest in six and a half years.