• 3 Tips to Avoid 'To Whom It May Concern'
    The five little words, "To Whom It May Concern," have been used to kick off traditional cover letters for decades. We are programmed to begin our formal introduction to companies this way. Having been taught that this was the correct salutation for a business letter of this kind, most of us don't even question it. But, maybe we should. At best, the phrase doesn't do us any favors; it just meets expectations and gets the job done. These days, we can do better.
  • Learn How to Manage Your Anger, and Get Ahead at Work
    We all experience anger, which is a normal and healthy response to perceived problems. If we never felt anger, something would be terribly wrong with our psyches. However, employees may find themselves in a situation where they can't win: if they express anger, they may be reprimanded or worse, and if they don't express anger, it will eat them up inside. Learn the necessary anger management skills for the workplace for your own survival and success.
  • What You Don't Know About Age Discrimination
    When people think of employment discrimination, they often think of discrimination based on race, gender, or disability. But age discrimination is very real. On the federal level, these claims are covered by the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, or ADEA. Indeed, ADEA claims continue to rise every year, and many think this will be the main form of employment discrimination in the future.
  • 5 Ways to Take Back Your Commute
    The popular wisdom is that commuting makes workers unhappy and unhealthy -- even unproductive. But knowing that a shorter commute would make your working life better isn't really helpful if you don't have the option to work closer to home. So how can you make the best of a bad situation?
  • Jobs Parents Just Don't Understand
    Many of the jobs workers are doing today didn't exist 20 years ago, or even 10 years ago. The world has been moving pretty fast, and our elders may struggle at times to keep up with all the innovation, technology, and novelty of today's work world. LinkedIn's recent survey found that one out of three parents has trouble understanding what their child does for a living, and half of them think they could be more supportive if they knew more. If your parents don't get what you do, here's how to explain it to them.
  • What Your Office Snack Says About You
    Even if you're a three squares a day type, you almost certainly have your favorite office snack. It's your go-to treat on hard days, your emergency fuel during late nights, your guilty pleasure or your virtuous energy boost. What you eat when you're at work can make you more productive or totally lethargic, depending on what you choose and what your particular body needs. One thing is for sure, though: while you're scanning the vending machine or digging in the fridge, your co-workers are learning a lot about you.
  • 9 Tips to Manage your Body Language at Interviews
    Whether you're going to your first job interview, you're out of practice, or you're generally nervous about interviews, make sure your body language doesn't give away your fear and apprehension. Stay aware of these general body language tips that can help you through your interview process.
  • This App Can Help You Network Better
    Ever been about to walk into a meeting or job interview, yet had no idea who you were about to talk to? Most people would tell you to prep for a meeting by looking at the participants' LinkedIn profiles to get a sense of what they do, what they’ve done, and a little bit about their educational background to see if you have anything in common. But what if there was an app that did actually did all that legwork for you?
  • How Long Will It Take You to Get a New Job?
    It's always nerve-wracking to contemplate making a leap to a new job. In today's market, however, where 770,000 American workers have been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer, it's especially scary to consider what could be an extended period of time out of work. Even if you're lucky enough to have a job, it's exhausting to think of pulling double-duty, as you surreptitiously interview around your regularly scheduled meetings. So how long can you expect to look, before you land something?
  • 3 Worst Traits of Bad Bosses, and How to Protect Yourself
    The boss is in charge, and when he points the finger at you, you could get burned. We all make mistakes, so admit your own -- but don't get pushed into accepting the blame for the mistakes of others. Learn to spot bad bosses and protect yourself from their dysfunctional behavior.
  • 3 Ways to Wake Up on Time (Even if You're Not a Morning Person)
    It's important to start your work day on the right foot. It can be very hard to feel strong, positive, and energized in the morning when you already feel like you're running behind. Getting to work on time can be a real struggle for some. So, if you're not a morning person, or if you find yourself arriving a little late from time to time, it might be a good idea to look into some new strategies for getting yourself up and out of the door in the morning.
  • Have a Tidy Desk, Even If You're a Slob
    Depending on which experts you ask, a messy desk is either a sign of creativity or a serious impediment to getting stuff done. No matter which school of thought you belong to, there are times when it makes sense to organize -- even if it's just temporarily, in order to keep track of a particularly sticky project or impress a new boss. If you're Team Messy, but you need to be neat, here's how to do it.
  • Fat Discrimination at Work Just as Bad as Ever, Especially for Women
    More than two-thirds of Americans over the age of 20 are overweight, according to the CDC, but prevalence doesn't mean acceptance. The professional world in particular discriminates against overweight workers, especially if those workers are female. A new study from Vanderbilt University found that overweight women were less likely to work in public-facing jobs, and suffered a severe wage penalty for weighing more than "normal" weight (as determined by the BMI, itself a controversial measuring stick).
  • How to Work for Companies That Focus on Social Good
    A few months ago, social media feeds exploded with friends and families dumping buckets of ice on their heads to raise awareness for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and encourage donations to research. This viral challenge, started by Pete Frates, who was diagnosed with ALS in March 2012, demonstrated the dedication of millennials -- and the companies they work for -- to social good.
  • Even Red States Recognize That the Minimum Wage Is Too Low
    America's federal minimum wage is $7.25 -- not enough to pay rent in many states. The debate over whether to raise the minimum rages on, but voters in some states -- and not just blue ones -- are taking matters into their own hands.
  • How to Decline a Request for Recommendation
    How do you handle a recommendation or reference request from a person you are not comfortable recommending? While you do not want to jeopardize the chances of the person on the job market, you also don't want to endorse them when you are not sure of their credentials or qualifications. So what can you do about it?
  • 10 Signs You're Facing Job Burnout
    Did you drag yourself into the office today? Maybe it's just the normal Monday morning gear-shift -- or maybe it's a sign of a bigger problem. If it's getting harder and harder to go to work, and you're getting less done while you're there, it's time to consider whether you're dealing with job burnout, and not just normal day-to-day stress.
  • 3 Questions to Ask Before You Accept a Job
    Congratulations! After what seems like an eternity of looking for a new job, you finally have that elusive offer. While the first thing you may be inclined to do is hit "reply" and accept the job, there are a few things you should consider first (if you haven’t already).
  • 3 Tips for Work-Life Balance on the Weekend
    Want to get more out of your few precious hours off each weekend? It starts with planning ahead. Spend a few minutes strategizing now, and next weekend, you can be far away from your computer, doing anything but thinking about work.
  • Moms Stay Home When Kids Are Sick
    Why do women still make less money than men? It's not all about overt prejudice on the behalf of employers. PayScale's data show that part of the issue is that women tend to gravitate toward careers that give back -- and pay less. While socially conditioned altruism might be part of the reason for that choice, another factor also influences women's career decisions: the need for a flexible schedule. Recent research shows that women are 10 times more likely than men to stay home with sick kids.