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  • BLS Jobs Report: 295,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Falls to 5.5 Percent
    Economists predicted gains of 240,000 jobs for February, but this morning's release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics beat expectations with 295,000 jobs added, and an unemployment rate that declined 0.2 points to 5.5 percent -- the lowest in six and a half years.
  • PayScale's 2015 College ROI Report: Will Your Degree Pay Off?
    Student loan debt has more than quadrupled over the past 20 years, according to Pew Research Center. In 2012, the average loan total was $29,400, and seven out of 10 students graduated with debt. No wonder that many prospective students (and their parents) consider the return on their college investment before choosing a school or program. PayScale's 2015 College ROI Report ranks the schools and majors whose graduates receive a high rate of return from attending -- in other words, they earned back their tuition and fees, and then some, and then went on to earn much higher salaries than they would have without their degree.
  • Vince Vaughn's Stock Photos Perfectly Capture the Excitement of Modern Corporate Life
    If you've ever read a single blog post about career development, job searching, or any other aspect of working for a living, you've seen them: corporate-themed stock photos. Most feature models who are so blandly inoffensive, it's hard to picture them ever gunning for a promotion or crying in a bathroom. But until now, none of them have featured Hollywood actors. (Well. Hardly any of them, anyway.)
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 212,000 Jobs in February
    Private payrolls added 212,000 jobs last month, according to this morning's ADP National Employment Report. That's slightly fewer jobs than the 220,000 predicted by economists and the slowest growth in the past six months.
  • PayScale at SXSW: Economic Mobility Through Education, and What Employers Really Want From Grads
    SXSWedu began as a regional event focusing on K-12 education in Texas, but since its inception in 2011, it has evolved into an international conference on what makes education work for students and educators. SXSWedu Conference & Festival now offers 300 sessions and workshops, 700 speakers, and an Education Expo. This year, PayScale is participating in two panel discussions: Economic Mobility Through Education, and What Employers Want Most and Get Least from Grads.
  • Forbes: Today's Billionaires Are Younger, 'Poorer,' More Numerous
    Bill Gates topped Forbes' 2015 billionaires list, and the other top names will look equally familiar, including Carlos Slim Helu (No. 2) and Warren Buffett (up to No. 3 this year, and the biggest gainer on the list). Elsewhere, though, the list contained plenty of shakeups and new faces.
  • 10 Career Lessons From #ReasonYouWereFiredInTwoWords
    The last thing you should do, if you get fired, is tweet about it -- especially in the heat of the moment, when you're embarrassed and trying to gather up the tattered bits of your dignity. If you've got a severance package, blabbing could even jeopardize it. No matter what, you want to look professional. No one wants to hire the person who complained about their former employer on social media, even if that employer really deserved it.
  • Does Your Face Reveal Your Job?
    If you're a leader in business, sports, or the military, people might be able to tell just by looking at your face, according to recent research published in The Leadership Quarterly. A team led by Christopher Y. Olivola of the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon found that participants could identify occupations for leaders "with above-chance accuracy."
  • No One Listens to Chicken Little
    Want to ensure that none of your co-workers listen to a word you say? Be the office Chicken Little. While cautious skepticism definitely has its place in any team environment, consistently negative people are unlikely to be heard -- even if they have something important to say.
  • 5 Tricks to Calm Down Before a Big Job Interview
    It's a cruel fact of the job search process: just when you need to have your wits about you, the pressure of acing the job interview makes it hard to project calm professionalism. If only you could be as relaxed before the interview as you inevitably will be after -- when all you have to do is think about how much better you'd be, if you could just do everything over again.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Everything Is a Crisis, Flat Wages, and Sinister Office Remodeling
    The past couple of years have been rough on everyone. If you managed to make it through the post-recession landscape without getting laid off yourself, chances are, you know someone who wasn't so lucky. Small wonder, then, that many workers are a bit anxious. This week's roundup looks at how to handle work anxiety and how to tell if layoff fears are justified. Plus: an explanation of why the economy is improving, but your paycheck isn't.
  • 5 Easy Ways to Be Happier at Work
    In a perfect world, we'd be able to walk away from less-than-awesome jobs, preferably after making a well-scripted scene that somehow has no lasting repercussions for our professional futures. In real life, however, being able to ditch an unwanted job at a moment's notice is as rare as a meet-cute on public transit with the love of your life. It's the stuff of romantic comedies, in other words. If you want to improve your life immediately, your best bet isn't ditching your job; it's learning how to make your life better while you sneakily make long-term plans to secure new employment.
  • These 5 Jobs Have the Worst Gender Wage Gap
    Women make about 80 percent of what men earn, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is a big improvement over 30 years ago, when the number was 65.7 percent, but far from pay equity. PayScale's research on the gender wage gap shows that some of the continued disparity between male and female pay is due to occupational "choice," i.e. women opting for lower-paying jobs that give back and allow more flexibility. But lower pay for women can't entirely be explained by job type. In fact, some of the highest-paying industries also feature the largest pay gaps.
  • 3 Ways to Be Productive When You Only Have 5 Minutes
    If only we could combine all those five-minute segments of time while we're on hold or idling in a meeting room, waiting for the other participants to appear, we could knock another item off our to-do lists almost every day. (Or, at least, take lunch away from our desks now and then.) Failing major changes to the way time and space work, the best we can do is take advantage of those minutes where we find them.
  • 5 Career Lessons From Leslie Knope
    The last episode of Parks and Recreation airs tonight, and while the show was never a runaway ratings hit, it holds a special place in many people's hearts. In no small part, this is because of its heroine, Leslie Knope, whose relentless energy and enthusiasm for even the drudge work involved in government service was an inspiration for every lady who's ever decorated her cubicle with pictures of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Hillary Clinton. Plus, she loves waffles: "We need to remember what's important in life: friends, waffles, work. Or waffles, friends, work. Doesn't matter, but work is third." Priorities!
  • Office Etiquette: No, the Boss Should Not Take Staff to See '50 Shades of Grey'
    The best thing about working with people is that you'll never be bored. The worst thing is that sometimes, boredom seems preferable to what you have to deal with from your fellow humans. For example, everyone's had that boss who was apparently out sick on Appropriate Behavior Day during management training.
  • Oscar-Winner Patricia Arquette Calls for an End to the Gender Wage Gap
    Oscar speeches are, for the most part, pretty boring. There's only so much a star can say during the 50 or 60 seconds they're allowed, before the "shut up" music swells. This year, however, Best Supporting Actress winner Patricia Arquette chose to make the most of her minute, and used her speech as a platform to call for wage equality for women.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Quit Your Job, Become a Social Introvert, and Change Your Attitude
    One of the toughest things about life, both personally and professionally, is that there's only so much you can control. You can't change your nature, for example, and become wildly extroverted if you're someone who draws her energy from within, and you can't necessarily make a bad job into a good one. You can, however, learn to make things better by cultivating certain skills and improving your attitude. And sometimes, you can quit your job and go on to another one -- if you go about things the right way.
  • 5 Inappropriate Workplace Touching Lessons From Joe Biden
    Maybe you're a hugger, or a back-slapper, or -- in your personal life -- a terrible flirt. Chances are, you know that none of this behavior will fly in the office, no matter how innocent your intentions. No one wants to be referred to HR for remedial training or, worse, lose their jobs because they didn't get the memo that it's 2015, and co-workers don't touch each other. In this, we are probably more with the program than many of our leaders in Washington. Take, for example, America's touchy-feeler-in-chief, Joe Biden.
  • The 5 Most Stressful Food Service Jobs
    There's a reason the great Tina Fey once said that her job producing, writing, and starring in 30 Rock was less stressful than "managing a Chili's on a Friday night." The job is set up to encourage stress: everything you have to do needed to happen five minutes ago, it's a multitasking nightmare, and you're dealing with the public. Often, the public is hungry. Always, the public seems to have gone out to eat because they're not allowed to abuse their families at home. You get the idea: food service is stressful.