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  • 3 Reasons to Show Gratitude in Your Career (Even When You'd Rather Skip It)
    Have your social media feeds been filling up with thankfulness over the past few days and weeks leading up to Thanksgiving? If these public statements of gratitude make you roll your eyes rather than count your blessings, never fear: we're not here to convince you to join a movement, or even start a journal or buy an app. However, focusing on the positive and remembering the ways in which you're lucky can be good for your career, if you go about things in a way that works for you.
  • Want Your Own Place? Avoid These 5 Jobs
    It's a hard world out there for young workers. PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, shows that 24 percent of Millennials have to move home at some point after starting their career. Those numbers are worse if you're a woman: 28 percent of female Gen Y workers have to move in with Mom and Dad. While the economy is obviously a major factor in whether or not you can afford your own place, job selection also makes a difference.
  • The Best Way to Stay Excited About Your Work: Take a Job You're Not Quite Qualified For
    We spend so much of our lives at work. While making money, having good benefits, and experiencing marked success are important, it might also be nice to actually be excited about the job you do. The benefits of having enthusiasm about your work, and passion for your job, are not to be underestimated, and staying challenged and stimulated by your occupation might just be the key.
  • 3 Reasons Not to Major in Business
    Business administration has long been the most popular undergraduate major in American colleges and universities. There is no doubt that students acquire valuable skills, such as leadership and decision making, through the coursework. However, that doesn't mean it's a sure path to a successful career.
  • Many Americans Would Improve Their Career Before Health or Relationships [Infographic]
    A new survey from Huffington Post reveals some surprising results about what makes Americans happy. Namely, nearly one-third of those surveyed would choose to improve their career or finances over their health or their relationships.
  • Study Reveals the 5 Scariest Jobs this Halloween
    Just in time for Halloween, CareerBuilder has released the results of a study that surveyed over 3,000 American workers about the jobs they fear most. If you’re looking for a good scare this season, just imagine yourself in one of the following positions.
  • 3 Reasons You Didn't Get the Job
    Every job interview, even a bad one, is an opportunity to learn something about how to pitch yourself to companies, and figure out what a given job entails and what the corporate culture has to offer. The problem, of course, is that hiring managers don't always tell you why the company opted to pass, which makes it harder to learn from your mistakes. Here's what might be holding you back, and how to tweak your approach to improve your chances in the future.
  • At Work, It's Better to be a Father Than a Mother
    While working mothers struggle with decreased pay and lack of status in a workplace that sees them as unreliable, working fathers enjoy improved status, pay, and benefits that help a growing family survive.
  • Why Millennials Shouldn't 'Do What They Love'
    These days, it seems like the most popular career advice -- especially for the younger generation -- is not to just find a job. Instead, everyone from thought leaders to popular bloggers are advising recent college graduates to ditch the traditional hunt for high-paying dream occupations (such as doctor and lawyer) and instead “do what you love.”
  • How to Get the CEO to Respond to Your Email

    Would you email Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg, or Marissa Mayer? If the answer is no -- and you have something to say -- maybe it's time to ask yourself why.

  • When to Quit a Job You Love

    Last week, we talked about how to tell when your body is telling you you need to quit your job. Sometimes, however, you might feel great about your job -- or at least, like it just fine -- but still need to quit for various reasons. It's not always obvious; learn to spot subtle signs and the writing on the wall.

  • 5 Ways to Change Careers Without Starting From Scratch

    When we talk about career changes, we often speak in leaps, e.g. lawyers who become history teachers or executives who leave big business to start their own mom-and-pop shops. But what about the smaller career evolutions, the kind that don't require a lot of extra education or training to effect? Here's how to make a career change that's a lot easier and less frightening than jumping into a strange new occupation.

  • Workers Less Loyal to Employers -- Even If They Get Raises

    Are you loyal to your employer? If so, you're a dying breed. A Randstad study of Canadian workers found that although half of respondents said they had "the perfect job," 65 percent would leave if doing so netted them a higher salary or offered better career opportunities. Experts say that workers feel less loyalty to their employers even if they offer more money.

  • Avoid These 3 Career Change Mistakes

    Very few people end their working life in the same career they started off in, when they took their very first job out of school. The good news is that this means there's less social pressure to stay on a path that's no longer satisfying. The bad news, of course, is that change is never easy. Here's what to avoid, if you're thinking of making the leap.

  • 3 Ways to Get Ahead at Work

    The economy may be recovering, but that doesn't mean that workers are swimming in raises and promotions. If you want to move forward in your career, you'll have to get creative and make opportunities for yourself. Here are a few things to do, daily, weekly, and monthly, to build professional relationships and lay the foundation for a better career.

  • #PayChat: The Skills Gap
    There are many factors that contribute to the skills gap. The issue is complex. On the one hand, employers believe that educational institutions are not preparing students for careers in today’s work world. On the other hand, colleges and universities say that it is their job to teach students how to think and not to provide practical job training. Schools believe that many companies have cut back on job training due to budget restraints. Whose responsibility is it to ensure that recent graduates are prepared for today’s work world?
  • 3 Career Lessons From Weird Al Yankovic

    It's Weird Al's world; the rest of us are just living in it. This week, his album Mandatory Fun hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts, #8days8videos blew up on Twitter, and everyone's co-workers and Facebook friends began posting links to Tacky and Word Crimes. Speaking of which, it became apparent that Weird Al's goal might not purely be to amuse us. It's clear that there's a lot to learn from the man who started his career with Dr. Demento as a mentor.

  • Is It Possible to Have Too Many Skills?

    When you think about what might keep you from getting hired for your dream job, you probably never consider the possibility that your issue might be too many skills, instead of too few. But broad experience over a range of different areas can sometimes work against you in the eyes of a hiring manager.

  • This CEO Thinks Recent Grads Don't Need Work-Life Balance

    Backupify CEO Rob May has some advice for folks just starting out in their careers: forget about work-life balance. To get ahead while you're young, he says, you have be prepared to take jobs you don't like, work harder than everyone else, and essentially leave having a life for later on.

  • 5 Tips for Finding the Right Mentor for You

    A good mentor can mean the difference between career success and stagnation, but there's a caveat: even the most visionary leader won't be much use to you, if the relationship isn't right.