• Want to Get More Done at Work? Do Less
    Some good news for anyone sick of 12-hour days at the office: the key to maximizing professional productivity may not be to work more, but rather to work less. According to a recent study conducted by the Draugiem Group, a social networking company, the average person remains productive for 52 minutes at a time. Using its productivity tracking app, DeskTime, the Draugiem Group analyzed users' time and tasks and found that the most productive 10 percent were those who worked for 52-minute intervals followed by 17-minute breaks, over the course of a workday that often lasted fewer than eight hours.
  • State Supreme Court Hands Down $188M Judgment Against Wal-Mart
    Hot on the heels of the recent Supreme Court decision against Amazon workers, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court just upheld the 2007 judgment for $188 million against Wal-Mart Stores, in Braun v. Wal-Mart Stores. The class action suit affects 187,000 workers, who worked for the company between 1998 to 2006, and centers around Michelle Braun and other Wal-Mart employees, who claimed that they were not compensated for working off-the-clock, as well as through meals and breaks.
  • Gaming, Craft Beer, and Cannabis Cultivation – 3 New Fields of Study for College Students
    Our economy is changing. The idea that many of the jobs that will be available 10 years from now don't exist today, is more true now than it has ever been. But, it's not just the tech industry that's moving our culture along. Many new professions await today's students, and universities are always trying to anticipate, and prepare for, these future opportunities. In response to the growth of some surprising industries, colleges are offering more and more outside-the-box fields of study that might be a little more than tempting to today's students. Come to think of it, many of yesterday's college students might have enjoyed them as well....
  • Congress Considers Drastic Cuts to Pension Plans
    For the first time ever, Congress may move to cut pension benefits to current retirees. Proposed legislation, which would take the form of an amendment to a $1.1 trillion spending bill, would cut benefits for multiemployer plans, common in the grocery, trucking, and construction industries, and often managed jointly by employers and unions.
  • To Spare Retail Workers, Some Shoppers - and Companies - Boycott Black Thursday
    For better or worse, Black Friday, the informal commercial holiday that follows the national holiday of Thanksgiving Day, has been a widely accepted fact of life for retail workers, and shoppers, for decades now. However, in the last few years, an effort by brick-and-mortar stores to compete with online retailers has led to earlier and earlier kickoffs to the official start of the holiday shopping season. Many stores now open their doors on Thanksgiving Day. This practice, along with other demands placed on retail workers by their employers during the holiday season, has serious consequences for these employees, and many are saying that enough is enough.
  • Obamacare Enrollment: What You Need to Know
    Last year, Obamacare, formally called the Affordable Care Act, helped 10 million Americans sign up for health insurance. Being insured is now a requirement, so it's important to be sure your coverage is all set for 2015. If your employer provides your insurance, nothing has changed and no action is required on your part. Just keep doing what you have been doing. But, if your employer doesn't offer health insurance, (or if you're a freelancer, or currently between jobs,) enrollment is a great option to get the coverage you need.
  • Even Red States Recognize That the Minimum Wage Is Too Low
    America's federal minimum wage is $7.25 -- not enough to pay rent in many states. The debate over whether to raise the minimum rages on, but voters in some states -- and not just blue ones -- are taking matters into their own hands.
  • Voters Approve Minimum Wage Increases in 2014 Midterm Election
    President Obama sparked fierce debate when he proposed raising the national minimum wage to $10.10 last year; the current national rate is $7.25. At the polls yesterday, voters expressed their strong support of this initiative, even as they cast votes for GOP candidates in the Senate and the House.
  • Is Capping Student Loans at $10K a Good Idea?
    Recently, billionaire investor Mark Cuban declared that fixing the student debt crisis is the most important thing our government can do to restore the national economy. His idea: cap federal student loans at $10,000 per student, per year. Few would argue that student loan debt isn’t a problem of epic proportions, but Cuban’s explanation of the crisis and his solution resulted in mixed reactions.
  • Study Reveals the 5 Scariest Jobs this Halloween
    Just in time for Halloween, CareerBuilder has released the results of a study that surveyed over 3,000 American workers about the jobs they fear most. If you’re looking for a good scare this season, just imagine yourself in one of the following positions.
  • 3 Things That Got Better for LGBT Workers Since Tim Cook Joined Apple in 1998
    Today, in an op-ed in BloombergBusinessweek, Apple CEO Tim Cook officially came out: "While I have never denied my sexuality, I haven't publicly acknowledged it either, until now. So let me be clear: I'm proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me."
  • Freedom Socialist Party Pushes for $20 Minimum Wage, Posts $13-an-Hour Job
    The Freedom Socialist Party, which broke away from the United States Socialist Workers Party in 1966, has been key in helping to drive new laws across the country to raise the minimum wage. Just this year, they helped cities like Seattle pass new laws that set the minimum wage at a a whopping $15 per hour, which will be phased in by April.
  • Starbucks to Increase Starting-Pay Rates in All US Markets Beginning in January
    Millions of Americans make ends meet every day with low-wage jobs at retail stores and restaurants. As these businesses are constantly criticized over low pay, one company is stepping up to the plate and has announced it will begin increasing starting pay beginning early next year.
  • Should You Apply to College? 5 Things to Consider

    It’s fall and many young people are looking at those college applications and thinking “is college still a good idea?” It’s a relevant question considering the high cost of tuition and the student debt problem in America. It’s also an issue that spurred debate this past spring. Before you decide whether you should take the plunge, take these factors into consideration.

  • At Work, It's Better to be a Father Than a Mother
    While working mothers struggle with decreased pay and lack of status in a workplace that sees them as unreliable, working fathers enjoy improved status, pay, and benefits that help a growing family survive.
  • Goucher College: Goodbye SAT, Hello YouTube

    College applications are a dreaded beast: prepping for, taking, and retaking the SAT or ACT, writing the clever and eloquent essay describing your 18 years on the planet thus far, begging teachers to write letters of recommendation, and then fretting over the final GPA on your transcripts. Now, imagine if all of that process was simply eliminated and instead of jumping through hoops, you made a video. No tests, no essays, no letters, no transcripts. That’s what one college is attempting to do.

  • Comedian John Oliver Skewers For-Profit Colleges

    Sunday’s Last Week Tonight delivered a 16 minute tongue lashing directed at for-profit colleges and their role in the student debt crisis. The schools have been at the center of a congressional investigation and have been called into question by the media and the public for their recruiting tactics and student loan practices. Host John Oliver didn’t hold back in his recap of the situation.

  • American-Sized Student Loan Debt for Australians?

    Australians have found themselves in the middle of a debate not unlike the ongoing dispute in the U.S. over the cost of higher education. This year, the Australian government unveiled a proposal that would allow universities to raise tuition without any regulatory restraints. Officials say the changes would make schools more competitive, but opponents believe college in Australia will become unaffordable.

  • 15 Things Working Moms Who Breastfeed Have to Think About (and 4 Tips to Make It Easier)
    Returning to work post-baby poses more problems than a newbie mother might anticipate, especially if she chooses to continue breastfeeding. Here are some tips to help pumping at work not be such a dump.
  • Should Colleges Be Held Accountable for the Success of Students?
    It’s been a year since the White House announced its plan for a new college rating system and most college presidents still don’t love it. The idea of being held accountable for the success of students doesn’t sit well with many administrators. Yet, with student debt mounting, full-time professors dwindling, and the cost of tuition skyrocketing, colleges may have to get comfortable with showing they’re worth it.