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  • Voters Approve Minimum Wage Increases in 2014 Midterm Election
    President Obama sparked fierce debate when he proposed raising the national minimum wage to $10.10 last year; the current national rate is $7.25. At the polls yesterday, voters expressed their strong support of this initiative, even as they cast votes for GOP candidates in the Senate and the House.
  • Is Capping Student Loans at $10K a Good Idea?
    Recently, billionaire investor Mark Cuban declared that fixing the student debt crisis is the most important thing our government can do to restore the national economy. His idea: cap federal student loans at $10,000 per student, per year. Few would argue that student loan debt isn’t a problem of epic proportions, but Cuban’s explanation of the crisis and his solution resulted in mixed reactions.
  • Study Reveals the 5 Scariest Jobs this Halloween
    Just in time for Halloween, CareerBuilder has released the results of a study that surveyed over 3,000 American workers about the jobs they fear most. If you’re looking for a good scare this season, just imagine yourself in one of the following positions.
  • 3 Things That Got Better for LGBT Workers Since Tim Cook Joined Apple in 1998
    Today, in an op-ed in BloombergBusinessweek, Apple CEO Tim Cook officially came out: "While I have never denied my sexuality, I haven't publicly acknowledged it either, until now. So let me be clear: I'm proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me."
  • Freedom Socialist Party Pushes for $20 Minimum Wage, Posts $13-an-Hour Job
    The Freedom Socialist Party, which broke away from the United States Socialist Workers Party in 1966, has been key in helping to drive new laws across the country to raise the minimum wage. Just this year, they helped cities like Seattle pass new laws that set the minimum wage at a a whopping $15 per hour, which will be phased in by April.
  • Starbucks to Increase Starting-Pay Rates in All US Markets Beginning in January
    Millions of Americans make ends meet every day with low-wage jobs at retail stores and restaurants. As these businesses are constantly criticized over low pay, one company is stepping up to the plate and has announced it will begin increasing starting pay beginning early next year.
  • Should You Apply to College? 5 Things to Consider

    It’s fall and many young people are looking at those college applications and thinking “is college still a good idea?” It’s a relevant question considering the high cost of tuition and the student debt problem in America. It’s also an issue that spurred debate this past spring. Before you decide whether you should take the plunge, take these factors into consideration.

  • At Work, It's Better to be a Father Than a Mother
    While working mothers struggle with decreased pay and lack of status in a workplace that sees them as unreliable, working fathers enjoy improved status, pay, and benefits that help a growing family survive.
  • Goucher College: Goodbye SAT, Hello YouTube

    College applications are a dreaded beast: prepping for, taking, and retaking the SAT or ACT, writing the clever and eloquent essay describing your 18 years on the planet thus far, begging teachers to write letters of recommendation, and then fretting over the final GPA on your transcripts. Now, imagine if all of that process was simply eliminated and instead of jumping through hoops, you made a video. No tests, no essays, no letters, no transcripts. That’s what one college is attempting to do.

  • Comedian John Oliver Skewers For-Profit Colleges

    Sunday’s Last Week Tonight delivered a 16 minute tongue lashing directed at for-profit colleges and their role in the student debt crisis. The schools have been at the center of a congressional investigation and have been called into question by the media and the public for their recruiting tactics and student loan practices. Host John Oliver didn’t hold back in his recap of the situation.

  • American-Sized Student Loan Debt for Australians?

    Australians have found themselves in the middle of a debate not unlike the ongoing dispute in the U.S. over the cost of higher education. This year, the Australian government unveiled a proposal that would allow universities to raise tuition without any regulatory restraints. Officials say the changes would make schools more competitive, but opponents believe college in Australia will become unaffordable.

  • 15 Things Working Moms Who Breastfeed Have to Think About (and 4 Tips to Make It Easier)
    Returning to work post-baby poses more problems than a newbie mother might anticipate, especially if she chooses to continue breastfeeding. Here are some tips to help pumping at work not be such a dump.
  • Should Colleges Be Held Accountable for the Success of Students?
    It’s been a year since the White House announced its plan for a new college rating system and most college presidents still don’t love it. The idea of being held accountable for the success of students doesn’t sit well with many administrators. Yet, with student debt mounting, full-time professors dwindling, and the cost of tuition skyrocketing, colleges may have to get comfortable with showing they’re worth it.
  • Franchise Owners Upset About Seattle's Minimum Wage Laws
    Seattle's new minimum wage of $15 per hour is more than twice the current federal minimum wage of $7.25. Some say businesses will suffer and employers will be unable to hire workers. Franchise owners in Seattle have an additional gripe: many are claiming that franchises are unfairly grouped under the umbrella of large businesses.
  • Where Wal-Mart Is Paying More Than Twice Minimum Wage
    If you need a job making $15 to $20 per hour, would you apply at Wal-Mart? If you live in Williston, North Dakota, you just might. The very fact that a company known for underpaying its workers is offering such wages has started some interesting conversations about minimum wage.
  • Is a Jobless Future a Good Thing?
    As technology advances and takes over menial jobs, will we lose jobs or create new ones? Some experts paint a rosy picture of the future in which society does not need as many jobs as we do today.
  • The Rise of the Permanent Temporary Worker
    For many job seekers, "temporary work" is a bit of an oxymoron. People looking for permanent positions end up taking whatever they can get, which is often a temporary job for an hourly wage, no benefits, and no job security.
  • University President Shares Salary With School’s Lowest Paid Workers
    It’s not everyday that a college president decides to take a $90,000 pay cut for the benefit of low-wage workers. Last week however, Raymond Burse, interim president of Kentucky State University, did just that. His decision sets a new precedent amongst presidents and CEOs to raise the bar on livable wages for employees.
  • How to Manage Your Social Anxiety at Work
    Social anxiety is more than just a disinclination to pack each weekend with parties. For sufferers, the average day at work can be a nightmare of stressful situations and reduced productivity. However, there are ways to manage and overcome this form of stress.
  • Male CEO Steps Down to Spend Time With Family

    When a woman quits her job to spend more time with family, no one bats an eye. When a man does the same, it's news. Earlier this week, Max Schireson announced that he'd be leaving his role as CEO of MongoDB in order to travel less and be at home with his wife and children more. The shock that reverberated throughout the internet is proof, if we still needed any, that men and women have not achieved parity in the business world.