ADVERTISEMENT
  • 40 Percent of American Workers Would Quit, If Not for Health Insurance

    On dark days, when your job gets you down, what stops you from handing in your letter of resignation? For 40 percent of workers, a recent study finds, it's health insurance -- specifically, health insurance that doesn't cost more or provide less than the plan they have through their employers.

  • Student Loan Bill Introduced by Marco Rubio and Mark Warner
    A bipartisan effort addressing the student loan crisis is underway with new legislation aimed at making payments more manageable and reducing defaults. The Dynamic Repayment Act was introduced in the Senate last week by Senators Marco Rubio (R-Fl.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.). Struggling borrowers are no doubt hopeful about possible relief, but no one should hold their breath. Congress will still have to approve.
  • Higher Minimum Wage Correlates With Job Growth
    One of the biggest arguments against raising the minimum wage has been a pay hike's potential impact on job growth. Many business groups argue that employers won't be able to hire more people if they can't offer low wages. However, recent data from the Department of Labor shows that this might not be the case. Twelve of the 13 states that raised their minimum wage since the beginning of the year have experienced more job growth than lower-wage states.
  • Fewer Freshman College Students Returning for Sophomore Year

    The rate of first-time college students returning for their sophomore year in 2013 dropped 1.2 percentage points, compared with the entering class of 2009, according to a new report from The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. The retention rate, however remained about the same, meaning that college students who left school were more likely to drop out entirely, and less likely to leave one school in order to enroll somewhere else.

  • Switching Companies May Earn You More Money

    Loyalty to one employer is no longer the best strategy for most workers, at least in terms of earnings. People who "job hop" and switch companies end up earning higher salaries than those who stick around.

  • BLS Jobs Report: 288,000 Jobs Added
    Any way you look at it, June was a great month for job growth and employment in various industries. Economists are hopeful that this trend will continue.
  • Parents Value Education But Won't Pay for College
    More parents are requiring their children to either take out loans or pay for their college educations out of pocket.
  • 5 Jobs That Pay Well, But May Not Be Fulfilling

    Some jobs don’t offer warm fuzzies, but they do give you a fat paycheck. If having that comfortable income is a priority for you, and you can find meaning in other aspects of your life, then here are some careers you might want to consider.

  • Wealthy College Presidents May Be the Reason You’re Broke [infographic]

    A recent report released by the Institute for Policy Studies finds that student debt and low-wage faculty labor are rising faster at state universities with the highest-paid presidents. Usually those three hotly debated issues: student debt, increased use of part-time faculty, and inflated executive pay are discussed as separate issues, but researchers wondered if the three were related. What they found shows that all three are connected in ways worthy of a Charles Dickens novel.

  • Women Need to Fall in Love With Computer Science ASAP

    Last month, Google revealed, for the first time ever, just how big the company’s gender gap is. Only 30 percent of Google’s overall employees are women and when looking specifically at tech-related jobs, the number drops to 17 percent. As it turns out, Google isn’t the only tech company with alarmingly low numbers of women.

  • Starbucks Offers Free Online College Classes to Employees

    Want to get that bachelor's degree you’ve always wanted, but couldn’t afford? Become a barista. The Starbucks Corporation announced Monday that it's going to finance online degrees for employees via Arizona State University. The Starbucks College Achievement Plan, the first of its kind, will be available to U.S. Starbucks employees working at least 20 hours a week.

  • The Future of Minimum Wage: More Money, But No More One-Size-Fits-All

    At the beginning of the month, Seattle's city council voted unanimously to increase the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour in stages over the next three to seven years. To get a business owner's perspective on the issue, we spoke via email with John Pepper, co-founder and former CEO of Boloco, a Boston-based restaurant chain with 22 units across New England. Pepper told us a bit about why a higher minimum wage isn't necessarily bad for business and what else needs to change for small businesses to thrive while paying their workers higher wages.

  • College Enrollment Is Dropping and That's Not a Bad Thing

    According to a recent report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, some older students are actually leaving school to return to an improving job market. Since last year, enrollment dropped by 0.8 percent; over the previous year, enrollment declined 2.3 percent.

  • Obama Signs an Executive Order Extending Student Loan Debt Cap

    Yesterday, President Barack Obama sat down with Tumblr founder David Karp to do a live Q&A on the service, answering questions about student loans and his recent executive order expanding the Pay-as-You-Earn program.

  • More Job Openings, But Not Necessarily More Hires

    On the last day of April, there were 4.5 million job openings, according to today's release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That's 0.3 million job openings more than in March. Hires, on the other hand, were practically flat at 4.7 million. What's going on here?

  • BLS Jobs Report: Economy Adds 217,000 Jobs, Unemployment Steady at 6.3 Percent

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics released its Employment Situation Summary for May, and the numbers are better than economists predicted. April's report was also higher than expected -- 288,000, instead of the 218,000 predicted. Unemployment, which dipped 0.4 percent to 6.3 percent in April, remained steady.

  • How Much Do You Need to Earn to Buy a Home in Your City?

    One of the causes of the Great Recession was predatory lending practices that encouraged borrowers to buy more house than they could afford. No wonder, then, that in the rebuilding years of our economy, many are focused on figuring out how much they'd need to earn to responsibly buy a home in their city.

  • ADP Jobs Report: Economy Adds 179,000 Jobs in May

    Private companies added 179,000 jobs last month, according to The ADP National Employment Report. That's less than the median prediction of 210,000 jobs offered by economists surveyed by Bloomberg.

  • How Long Will It Take to Pay Off Your Student Loans?

    Over 70 percent of college seniors carry student loan debt. The average amount owed? $29,400 per borrower. For an entering first-year student, who might never have earned more than minimum wage at an after school job, that's an incomprehensible amount of money.

  • College Grads: Hiring to Increase Nearly 9 Percent

    The Class of 2014 may not have to don fast food uniforms after the caps and gowns come off. Employers that hire new grads are feeling optimistic about the market and plan to hire 8.6 percent more college graduates this year as compared to last. Starting salaries for this year's class are also up by 1.2 percent, all this according to a recent survey released by The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).