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  • 5 Ways to Get Unstuck In Your Career
    As they say, it happens to the bet of us. Getting stuck in your career isn’t the end of the road, it can actually be a hidden opportunity ready for the taking. Here are a few tips to help you get yourself out of a seemingly hopeless career rut and on your way to professional bliss.
  • Why Fear Success?

    Why Fear Success?
    It may seem completely counterintuitive, but one of the greatest obstacles to success is often fear that we may succeed. It's that petrified stagnation that prevents us from looking for another job, pursuing advancement, and even taking actions we know will bring about change. Perhaps we've become so accustomed to failure that the idea of success is unbelievable. We don't want to get our hopes up, and we may also fear the side effects that would come with success.
  • Deflate Your Bullying Boss With Passive-Aggression
    Bullying: it's not just for schoolyards anymore. Bullying is simply the act of humiliating and causing harm, sometimes physical, to other people. Unfortunately, bullying behavior is highly durable because bullies often get what they want. In other words, bullying works for the bully. Passive-aggressive behavior may deflate your bully's bubble.
  • Distracted No More: How to Get Work Done at Work
    What's keeping you from getting stuff done at work? It may be something as simple as dealing with chatty co-workers, or getting up every hour for a cup of coffee. Singularly, each delay may seem like no big deal, but taken together, the distractions add up -- affecting your productivity and performance. So, let's get past this seasonal funk and lack of focus, and start working toward heading off the distractions that affect our office lives.
  • 10 Signs You Are About to Be Fired
    Something's just not right and you can sense it. Perhaps there's been a recent acquisition, or your manager keeps talking to HR. Almost everything you say is now documented. If you notice some or all of the following signs, stay on your guard. You may be shown the door soon.
  • Working Moms Are Still Getting the Short End of the Stick
    Let's face the facts: being a working mother is exhausting and, oftentimes, completely defeating. Many women put their own career and life aspirations on hold to raise children, but very few of these ladies actually speak openly about the endless struggles they face on a daily basis. Here are the facts that you should know about the realities of working mothers and what you can do to help.
  • When the Boss Is a Bully
    Few things are as disruptive to your professional contentment as a difficult boss. In fact, a bad boss or supervisor is the number one reason people quit their jobs. When the boss is a bully, you may feel depressed, drained, disrespected, and angry -- maybe even on a daily basis. It can be confusing to try to sort out your options and determine what you should do. The good news is, you won't feel this way forever. There are some things you can do that should help you cope with your bullying boss, or maybe even make the situation better.
  • Getting Heard: 5 Tips for Meetings
    Working women, have you ever attempted to present an idea in a meeting, only to be interrupted, shut down, or ignored, seemingly based on nothing more than your gender? If so, you have experienced "speaking while female," a term coined by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant to describe women's frequent experience of having their thoughts discredited by male co-workers and bosses. While you can't singlehandedly undo generations of gender bias, there are certain things you can do to improve your chances of being heard.
  • Your Job Is Encouraging Absenteeism (But Here's How to Fix It)
    Absenteeism is obviously a problem for businesses; productivity suffers when people don't come to work and temporary fill-ins can be expensive. But having co-workers call in sick too often also has a detrimental effect on those of you who are left behind to shoulder the burden. Spot the warning signs that your workplace and your own job are suffering due to absenteeism, and deal with the root causes directly.
  • 9 Things to Consider Before Making an Employee Referral
    If you work for a well-known company or in a coveted field, you may have already received requests from friends, relatives, acquaintances, and LinkedIn contacts to forward their resumes for a suitable role in your organization. This could put you in a bind if you're dealing with a good friend who would be a bad fit for the culture or an acquaintance you know nothing about -- and let's not even talk about the random LinkedIn request. So what should you do without damaging your relationship or reputation at work?
  • Today's 4 Least Stressful Jobs
    Some jobs are more stressful than others. A recent study from CareerCast analyzed careers according to 11 specific demands placed on workers that are known to cause stress. The list evaluated factors like like travel time, competitiveness, and deadlines.
  • Smartphones in the Workplace: Productivity Tool or Time Suck?
    Forty-five percent of American adults owned a smartphone as of 2013, according to EdTech Magazine. Used well, these devices can make your personal and professional life easier -- provided you have good boundaries and can disconnect when you need to.
  • How Being Funny Can Help You Get (or Lose) the Job
    Humor has the potential to ease social situations when used in the right context and in the right spirit, and where do we need that more than in the office? Workplace humor can be tricky, however. While it can help alleviate stress, increase bonhomie, and make you a sought-after colleague, it can also brand you as insensitive, unprofessional, and crass. The content, subject, and intent of your jokes can make or dent your image.
  • 5 Tips for Coping With an Unhappy Co-worker
    Everyone has a bad day once in a while, and offering support to co-workers is the kind approach in these instances. However, sometimes a colleague is chronically unhappy, spreading gloom day after day. Maybe they complain a lot -- about work, their personal life, or both. Perhaps it's just the way they sulk around the office, or it's the miserable countenance they wear every time you're in a meeting together. No matter how the condition manifests itself, working with someone who is persistently unhappy can be a real drag, to say the least.
  • The Case for Taking a Real Lunch Break
    In a work-obsessed culture, it can seem important to get the job done, and done quickly, even if it that often means putting deadlines ahead of health and happiness. If there's any free time, a concept that might seem strange to many working professionals, it's spent in assessing possible project areas to increase revenue and improve the profitability of the company. But just because corporate culture doesn't place a value on lunch breaks, doesn't mean that it's good for productivity to skip them. If taking lunch does not figure anywhere in your priority list, maybe it is time to take another look at your planner.
  • Choice Blindness: You Really Don't Know What You Are Doing
    When we make decisions at work, we are often asked to explain or defend our choices before and even after they have been put into effect. Studies show that people often are not aware of their choices after they have made them, and this "choice blindness" may have serious effects upon their behavior at work.
  • How to Get a New Job, Without Changing Companies
    If you are looking for a change, it is often possible to look for a job within your company. A cross-functional exposure that enhances your skill-set, or even a move to a different team that performs the same job as you, could help your career. An internal transfer offers you the opportunity to network and work with various colleagues, clients, and partners. It also helps you learn and deal with various leadership styles and team dynamics.
  • How to Be a Better Listener
    Part of your job at work is to listen, which sounds easier than it is. With so much emphasis on fulfilling action items, and on productivity overall, the art of listening well is increasingly undervalued in the modern American workplace.
  • 5 Reasons to Defer Holiday Vacations
    If you worked during the holiday, instead of taking a vacation, you're not the only one. There's a growing trend among American workers toward more strategic planning of vacation opportunities -- taking advantage of every possible dollar and allotted hour to build a vacation experience that you and your family won't ever forget.
  • 5 of the Coolest Company Cafeterias
    Back in high school, the cafeteria's role as a road map for social status was limited to the seating arrangements of the people eating in it, but now it's the room itself that holds all the power. From in-house sushi chefs to onsite sustainable farms, companies around the country pull out all the stops when it comes to creating a state-of-the-art culinary haven for their workers. Here's a roundup of some of the most enviable examples.