• Is Getting Into an Elite School the Only Way to Define Success?
    Upon entering high school, I was under the impression that my life would resemble that of Marissa Cooper from The OC, coming home past my curfew because I was out with a cute boy or getting into some shenanigans with my best gal pals. If we ignore the blatant reality that I was not a wealthy, blonde teenager (who was obviously at least 25), my high school experience was still vastly different from the one depicted on the television programs I watched. In retrospect, I believe my high school experience more closely resembles Olivia Pope's narrative on Scandal; I was constantly under pressure to appear perfect.
  • 5 Surprising Facts About Lunch Breaks
    Most of the time, lunch doesn't really feel like that big of a deal. If we're able to take a lunch break, we generally feel glad, and enjoy a short respite from the craziness of the workday. Often though, we lunch at our desks, or on our feet, unable to take the time to sit down and eat, even just for a few minutes. Still though, what does it really matter? Well, here are a few surprising facts about lunch breaks that might inspire you to pay a little more attention to how you spend this time.
  • Cards Against Humanity's Most Surprising Move Yet
    There's a lot of bad news out there, and we seem to love to talk about it. In fact, sometimes we make things out to be a lot worse than they are. As Nicholas Kristof recently pointed out, our current political climate causes us to ignore the positive strides the world is making every day. In that light, let's take this opportunity to laud a shining example of corporate philanthropy in a place you probably wouldn't expect it: a naughty card game.
  • Your Standing Desk Is No Healthier Than a Regular Old Sitting Desk, Study Finds
    Bad news, standing-desk fans: according to a study from Exeter University and University College London, you're getting sore feet for nothing. After following 5,000 people over the course of 16 years, researchers determined that standing desks are no better for your health than standard ones. Being still, they contend, whether standing or sitting, is bad for your health.
  • How to Survive an Open Office If You're an Introvert
    Big, open spaces crammed full of bodies with nothing to break up the sound of a workday frenzy: sounds great, right? While open offices seemed like a way to promote collaboration (and save money by putting more employees per square foot), the trend does have its drawbacks, especially if you're a bit more turtle than tiger at work. Here's how to cope when your privacy at work goes bye-bye.
  • Why California's Equal Pay Law Is a Step In the Right Direction
    On Tuesday, the California Fair Pay Act was signed into law. Different from other equal pay legislation, it mandates that women receive equal pay for "substantially similar work." California women make about 84 percent of what men make (higher than the national average of 78 percent), but women of color are the most disproportionately affected by the gender pay gap: African-American women bringing in 64 cents on the dollar, and Latina women making 44 cents.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Build a LinkedIn Profile Recruiters Will Love
    LinkedIn is a rare bird in the social media landscape: it's extremely useful for its specific purpose – building your career – but not necessarily a place to hang out online, like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. As a result, it's easy to let your LinkedIn profile slide when you get a promotion or take on new responsibilities, and not realize it until the absence of recruiter attention calls the issue to mind. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to make your LinkedIn profile shine, plus why being a good helper isn't always the best thing for your career, and a few tips on getting unstuck when you're in a rut.
  • Workplace Lulz: Bacon Bits Are the Key to Career Success
    With help from our friends at Reddit, your Friday is about to get significantly better. Take some advice from awkward seal and this dog dressed up in a suit as we take on the hilarious and sometimes sensitive issues we often experience in the workplace. Today, we cover everything from understanding your benefits to how to deal when your co-worker brings his pet goat to your BBQ. Oh, and Bacon Bits.
  • Hey, Men: Gender Equality Is Good for You Too!
    In his TED Talk last spring, Michael Kimmel spoke about something he knows something about: men and privilege. Not only is he a middle-class white male (arguably the most privileged since the dawn of time, by his estimation), but he's also a sociologist and author who studies how equality (or lack thereof) affects everyone, not just those left out in the cold.
  • 7 Things You Should NEVER Say to Co-Workers
    Given the amount of time we spend at work, it's understandable that a lot of us get pretty comfortable there. It's a good thing when you can really be yourself at work, and it's nice to have friends there, too. But, no matter how much your workplace feels like a home away from home, the truth is that it isn't. Your workplace is a professional environment, and there are some lines that should never be crossed. Let's take a look at a few things that you should never say to your co-workers. Really. Never.
  • 3 Reasons Why It's Tough to Teach in West Virginia (and These Other States)
    There are a lot of wonderful things about being a teacher, but it's a really difficult job, too. It's a profession that's immensely rewarding and immeasurably challenging all at once, each and every day. It's a job that's always changing – new students, new culture, new curriculum. The pay is relatively low, when measured against what other comparably trained professionals earn, and the hours are very long. (Yes, even when you consider the summer, despite what you might have heard.)
  • To See How Few Women There Are at the Top, Photoshop Out the Men
    If you watched the Democratic primary debate last night, one thing probably stood out to you, regardless of your political leanings: Hillary Clinton was the only woman on the stage. In fact, as far as American politics is concerned, one out of five is just about the norm: currently, women hold 104 out of 535 seats in Congress, a 19.4 percent average. (It gets worse if you look at women of color – 31.7 percent of the number of women, and just 6.2 percent of the total.) Of course, we love data, but numbers can seem abstract. Sometimes, you can't beat a good visualization to really see the problem. Recently, British Elle's feminism issue gave us just that, with a video that shows men gradually removed from photos of politics in action ... leaving just a few women behind.
  • The 3 Most and Least Recession-Recovered Cities
    Since the Great Recession, cities have been struggling to recover their housing markets, job opportunities, and economies overall. The recovery has been spotty – in some cities and states more than in others.
  • Jennifer Lawrence Speaks Out About the Gender Pay Gap
    Jennifer Lawrence is known for being a badass, whether she's on the big screen fighting a dystopian civil war or railing against body shaming to Barbara Walters. Cripes, she's won an Oscar and been nominated for two more, PLUS she's the lead in a billion-dollar grossing movie trilogy (and a half) and she just turned 25! With a no-nonsense head on her shoulders, she's made waves a few times in Hollywood for speaking her mind, but she hasn't spoken out about the gender pay gap, until now.
  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Offers Employees 52 Weeks Paid Parental Leave
    Who says extended parental leave is just for tech companies like Netflix or Microsoft? The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation recently announced a new parental leave policy of 52 paid weeks for mothers or fathers during the first year after the birth or adoption of a child, plus unlimited time off for all employees.
  • 3 Sneaky Downsides of Working at Home (and How to Handle Them)
    Working at home can be a dream or a nightmare, depending on the job, your preferences, and the disposition of your colleagues. It's pretty easy to find guidelines to making a telecommuting situation a success: you know you need to keep your boss in the loop, for example, and make sure your co-workers can see that you're really working. But, what about those pitfalls that arise only once you're comfortably ensconced in your brand-new home office? Here's what you can expect.
  • Key Results of the 2015 Women In the Workplace Study
    Women in the Workplace, a recent study conducted by and McKinsey & Company – building off of similar work done by the latter in 2012 – examines the current state of women in corporate America. Over 100 companies and nearly 30,000 employees participated. The survey results and accompanying data shed some light on the fact that women are still underrepresented at every level of corporate life, and the study goes a step further, examining the root causes of the problem. Let's take a closer look at a few of the key findings.
  • How to Influence Without Authority
    Ever had to get people to contribute to a project, even though you're not actually their manager? Tough job, isn't it? Managing people without being in a position of power over them can be a daunting task, especially if it doesn't come naturally to you. But there are ways you can get your colleagues to help you in your job without the need for the carrot or, well, the stick.
  • Nontraditional College Students Are the New Normal
    The landscape of higher education is changing. Online learning options, the high cost of tuition, fading tenure programs for professors – today's college experience looks very different than the one students encountered 15 or 20 years ago. But, maybe some of these changes were designed to address what might be the biggest change of all: the change in the students themselves. Let's take a closer look at today's college students in an attempt to get a better sense of how their circumstances and objectives have shifted in recent years.
  • Apply the Bechdel Test at Your Next Meeting to Evaluate Gender Diversity at Work
    China's President Xi Jinping recent visit to Seattle was big news for what it signified about the city's rising prominence as a global tech hotspot. But a quick survey of photographs of the Chinese dignitary hob-knobbing with executives in the Emerald City reveals that while more companies are talking about their lack of female executives, it's pretty obvious that we haven't made great strides in actually solving the problem and fostering workplaces where women can rise to leadership roles as easily as men.

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)

Comp Managers: Start Here »