• Tell Me Your Salary, I'll Tell You Mine
    If you were absolutely sure your boss couldn't retaliate against you for revealing your salary to your co-workers, would you tell? Thanks to improved worker protections, we might soon find out.
  • Family Medical Leave Act and Veterans
    A recent National Law Review headline alerted employers to update their Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) policies. The federal government revised theses guidelines in 2013 to expand military leaves of absences. If you or a family member is a veteran or in the military, know which benefits apply to you.
  • How to Build Resilience for Career Success
    Resilience is a person's ability to adapt. Resilience is not just about "bouncing back" from trauma and tragedy, but also from difficult experiences at work or financial stressors. And those who are able to bounce back after stress-producing life events, large and small, are much more likely to succeed.
  • Learn the Science of Success
    What's stopping you from achieving your dreams? In a recent Psychology Today article, clinical psychologist Melanie Greenberg writes about research-based strategies people use to succeed at work and in life. These empirically proven techniques can help you succeed, too.
  • Older Job Seekers May Have Advantages
    It seems that workers 55 and older are not planning on retiring the way they used to. Some continue to work to make ends meet, some to fund their leisure pursuits, and still others simply because they have energy and want to do something productive with their time. If you are an older worker looking for a part-time or hourly job, use your age and experience to your benefit.
  • Top College Admissions Rates Have Fallen
    The news about top colleges and universities accepting fewer and fewer applicants each year may be alarming, but it is also complicated. Instead of giving up, take critical look at how and why this is happening.
  • The Rise of the Permanent, Unpaid Intern
    Unpaid internships were designed for students to get valuable training outside of the classroom. Some professions require supervised internship hours toward graduation and licensure. Unfortunately, the internship seems to have evolved into a default position that job seekers take to avoid not having anything at all. This is a problem, and it is also in some cases illegal.
  • 3 Productivity Tips From the Experts

    If you want to know how to change your behavior, ask a psychologist! In Psychology Today, 15 psychologists shared their views on how to become more productive. The following are the highlights of their many pearls of wisdom.

  • Conservatives Want YOU to Go Without Healthcare
    The Affordable Care Act is now law, and in spite of the various technical glitches, Americans have been signing up, so that they may enjoy access to healthcare when they get sick. For some people, this may be the first time they have ever had health insurance. Now, there is a push from conservatives to change the definition of the full-time work week to get employers who do not want to offer benefits off the hook.
  • Write Things Down to Avoid Ambiguity and Conflict at Work

    Lack of good communication results in misunderstandings, differing expectations, and anxiety. If you reduce ambiguity in your communications, you reduce conflict and increase productivity. Yes, it really is that simple. Here's how.

  • Meditation Improves Productivity
    When we think of meditation, we may think of relaxation, breathing, and emptying the mind of stressful thoughts. It may be surprising to learn that the act of quiet meditation increases mental acuity and makes us more productive at work. Instead of meditation emptying our minds, it actually helps fill them with improved concentration and creativity.
  • Severance Payments Are Taxable

    Most people don't want to think about losing their jobs. However, it is best to know the law and to plan ahead just in case you get surprised by bad news. It may come as a shock to hear that severance payments are taxable.

  • The Gender Pay Gap: Do We Need More Laws or More Enforcement?
    Women deserve equal pay for equal work. There are laws on the books dating back to 1963 that are designed to protect women from being paid less than men for doing the same work. However, we continue to see complaints, such as the one against the owners of Kay Jewelers and Jared, from allegedly underpaid female employees. Is the answer more laws, or more enforcement?

  • Maybe He Shouldn't Go to Jared: Female Workers File Complaint Against Jewelry Chain

    A typical ad for Jared's jewelery stores shows women melting with gratitude after being presented the one thing that every woman, wants, in the world of advertising, if nowhere else -- a mined rock. According to some female employees of the chain, however, working for the company is less than a dream come true.

  • San Francisco Demonstrates What Happens When We Raise The Minimum Wage
    Over the past 15 years, the city of San Francisco has given us evidence of what happens when we raise the pay and benefits of low-wage workers. Is it doom and destruction or the city of Oz?
  • Which States Tip the Best and Worst?
    For tipped employees, the generosity of the public may mean the difference between buying a steak or asking the landlord for an extension on the rent. And some tipped employees rely on tips more than others, because in some states it is legal to pay tipped employees a couple of bucks an hour. When we compare tipping practices from state to state, we find some pretty strange results.
  • 4 New Rules for a New Era of Job Searching

    The job market for 2014 continues to become more competitive. The right education and skills are not enough to land a good job, because all the other applicants also have the right education and skills. So what can you do to increase your chances of not just getting an interview, but getting hired?

  • Why Do Graduates Leave Their State?
    Public colleges and universities rely heavily on state funding in order to offer affordable classes to their student body. However, in some states, that same student body leaves after graduation, essentially causing the public system of higher education to invest in the workforce for other states. The reasons for this are complex and surprising; it certainly requires more than a quick fix.
  • When Are Creative Job Applications Too Creative?
    You may have heard by now about Leah the Lego figurine. Leah is the perfect Account Service Intern, complete with a blue suit and sensible shoes. She made her debut applying for positions at advertising agencies. It's an attention-getting idea; and the first step in getting a job is getting noticed. But will it work?
  • Wealthier Schools Admit Fewer Students With Pell Grants

    Payscale's latest college ROI report uncovers a disturbing trend in higher education for low income students. Wealthier schools with the highest ROI may not be serving those who are eligible for federal monies to help pay their way.