ADVERTISEMENT
  • How to Negotiate a Raise in 2015
    Why is it so scary to ask for what you deserve, especially when it involves a dollar amount? For one thing, we live in a society where talking about money is considered tacky, as is blowing your own horn. To get the salary that's appropriate for our experience, skills, and capabilities, you need to get comfortable doing both. PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide helps you feel more secure asking for a raise or establishing your starting pay by breaking the process into three parts: research, strategy, and negotiating.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 241,000 Jobs in December
    Ahead of this morning's ADP National Employment Report, economists predicted the addition to private payrolls of 225,000 jobs. The report, which is jointly produced by Moody's Analytics and payroll processor ADP, showed higher gains than expected -- 241,000 jobs in all. In addition, last month's payrolls were adjusted upward from 208,000 jobs to 227,000 jobs.
  • The 23 Best Pieces of Career Advice Readers Ever Received
    A long time ago -- or maybe it only feels that way -- our careers were at their beginning. Full of promise, ambition, and possibly misplaced self-confidence, we embarked on our journey up the corporate ladder. The luckiest among us received plenty of advice from the wiser and more experienced people in our lives, whether they were our parents, teachers, first bosses, or friends. If we were really fortunate, we were even able to hear it.
  • Unemployed Men Still Do Less Housework Than Women
    Possibly the only upside to being unemployed, as long as it doesn't go on too long, is finally having enough time to take care of your living space and spend time with your children, if you have them. But as The Upshot's Josh Katz recently discovered, even unemployment looks different, depending on whether you're a man or a woman.
  • Aim Higher, and Get the Job
    Are you going on a lot of interviews, but not getting any offers? The problem might be that you're setting your sights too low.
  • Fake These 5 Characteristics, and Seem More Confident
    When you feel confident, the people you interact with in your career are more likely to reward you with the things you want, whether it's a job or a promotion or a raise or a parking space closer to the front door. This is potentially pretty unfair, of course, since anyone who's worked with other humans for more than a day knows that confidence isn't always an indicator of competence. So what can you do, if you're deserving, but underappreciated -- and not burdened with an excess of self-regard? Game the system, and fake it until you make it.
  • Your Workday Starts Too Early, Says Awesome Study
    Do you feel a subtle pressure to get in to work early? It's not in your head. Many companies create a culture that rewards long working hours. The problem, according to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, is that getting up with the roosters often means cutting down on time spent sleeping.
  • 7 Career Resolutions to Make This New Year's
    Depending on how 2014 treated you, the dawn of a new year is either a welcome chance to start over or an opportunity to continue building on what you're already creating. Either way, it's a good time to engage in a little self-reflection, so that next year brings you more of what you want in your career and your life, and less of what drove you crazy during the past 12 months.
  • 5 Gifts to Give Yourself (and Your Career!) in 2015
    Even if you don't observe any of the December holidays, personally, there's almost no way you've made it this far into the month unscathed by the gift-giving madness. Now that all of the bustling and spending has come to end, it's time to turn your attention inward, and ask yourself what you need and want in the next year, in order to get the career you deserve. Good news for your bank account: many of these "gifts" are free.
  • It Was Really Only a Matter of Time: This Human Hamster Wheel Now Exists
    In an effort to prevent death by sitting, office workers and their employers have adopted all kinds of active desk situations, from standing to treadmills and bikes. Now, Pier 9 artist-in-residence Robb Godshaw offers another option for exer-working: the human hamster wheel.
  • Surprise: The US Is Terrible at Work-Life Balance
    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development recently released its biannual report ranking its member countries for work-life balance. Out of 34 countries, the U.S. came in 29th, beating Australia but trailing Poland. Turkey came in last, with 45 percent of workers pulling 50-hour weeks, and Denmark first, with about 2 percent doing the same. Get out your giant foam fingers and start up the chant: We're 29! We're 29!
  • These Are the 7 Worst Things Readers Have Seen at an Office Holiday Party
    What is it about holiday parties that makes people think they should reenact their college keggers? Perhaps it's dealing with a number of different stressors all at once, from pre-travel work deadlines to holiday shopping to coordinating with teammates who are increasingly checked out. Then, of course, there's the bad-decision potentiating power of alcohol. If there's one thing the following stories have taught us, it's that everyone would be better off starting their January cleanse a few weeks early. Certainly, their careers would thank them.
  • Do Male Managers Really Need a Guide to Working Women?
    This weekend, Joanne Lipman, former deputy managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, offered a slightly different spin on the usual career advice for women hoping to finally achieve pay equity and equal opportunity in the workplace: namely, she focused on men, specifically male managers. Some commentators were less than thrilled.
  • Here's What Workers Cared About in 2014: 10 Most Popular Posts
    Humans are fascinated by the worst-case scenario -- the blown job interview, the botched salary negotiation, the bad college choice. It's not always schadenfreude, either. By analyzing the bad things that could happen, it's easier to prepare and avoid them. This year, PayScale's most popular posts were the ones that helped readers dodge disaster.
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Hilarious Holiday Tantrums and December Job Searching
    The holidays are a challenging time to be a working person. Half the people you need to talk to seem to be on vacation, or at least mentally checked out, your office is filling up with sugary treats you don't want, but can't stop eating, and the nonstop social whirl seems to bring out the worst in your co-workers. Fortunately, some of PayScale's favorite bloggers and writers have tips on staying healthy and sane during the season -- while maintaining your sense of humor, to boot.
  • Once Again: It's a Bad Idea to Talk About Sensitive Subjects at Work
    How is your workplace similar to your aunt's house during a holiday celebration? Both are bad places to talk about politics, religion, or anything that's liable to get people riled up. Of course, knowing better doesn't necessarily mean doing better.
  • What Code Should You Learn? [infographic]
    Learn to code. It's the advice of career experts everywhere, from high school guidance counselors to mid-career job coaches. But with literally hundreds of languages to choose from, you might find yourself a bit lost as to which language to focus on first -- especially if the goal isn't to become a computer programmer, but rather to boost your career in your current (non-programming) field.
  • Congress Considers Drastic Cuts to Pension Plans
    For the first time ever, Congress may move to cut pension benefits to current retirees. Proposed legislation, which would take the form of an amendment to a $1.1 trillion spending bill, would cut benefits for multiemployer plans, common in the grocery, trucking, and construction industries, and often managed jointly by employers and unions.
  • How Long Should You Stay at Your Job?
    Over a quarter of Millennials think that workers should stay in a role for less than a year before moving on, according to data collected from PayScale's employee survey, and compiled in the report Gen Y on the Job. Only 13 percent of respondents in the same age group thought employees should stay at a job for more than five years. That's a big shift from earlier generations, and sign that job hopping might be gaining in popularity -- at least among workers themselves. Given that companies pay to train and hire workers, however, and hiring managers probably don't want to see a checked employment history, how do you determine the perfect tenure?
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Better Networks, Freedom From Email Slavery, and Early Retirement
    Which stories shaped your career this week? The big headline is obviously the jobs reports. The ADP report, which is based on payroll data from private employers, showed gains of 208,000 jobs for November. The news from the Bureau of Labor Statistics was even better: non-farm payrolls added 321,000 jobs last month. For workers, this is good news -- but it's not the whole conversation. To see what else is working Americans' minds this week, we turn to some of the most popular career bloggers on the internet.