• Obamacare Enrollment: What You Need to Know
    Last year, Obamacare, formally called the Affordable Care Act, helped 10 million Americans sign up for health insurance. Being insured is now a requirement, so it's important to be sure your coverage is all set for 2015. If your employer provides your insurance, nothing has changed and no action is required on your part. Just keep doing what you have been doing. But, if your employer doesn't offer health insurance, (or if you're a freelancer, or currently between jobs,) enrollment is a great option to get the coverage you need.
  • Even Red States Recognize That the Minimum Wage Is Too Low
    America's federal minimum wage is $7.25 -- not enough to pay rent in many states. The debate over whether to raise the minimum rages on, but voters in some states -- and not just blue ones -- are taking matters into their own hands.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 214,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.8 Percent
    The economy added 214,000 jobs last month, according to today's report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, slightly less than the 230,000 jobs predicted by economists. In addition, the unemployment rate declined 0.1 percent from the previous month.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Economy Added 230,000 Jobs in October
    The private sector added 230,000 jobs last month, according to the ADP National Employment Report, exceeding analysts' estimates of 220,000 jobs added.
  • Is Capping Student Loans at $10K a Good Idea?
    Recently, billionaire investor Mark Cuban declared that fixing the student debt crisis is the most important thing our government can do to restore the national economy. His idea: cap federal student loans at $10,000 per student, per year. Few would argue that student loan debt isn’t a problem of epic proportions, but Cuban’s explanation of the crisis and his solution resulted in mixed reactions.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 248,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.9 Percent

    Thanks to an increase in hiring, the economy blew past analysts' predictions of 215,000 jobs added in September, according to this month's report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate, at 5.9 percent, was at its lowest level since mid-2008.

  • ADP Jobs Report: Economy Added 213,000 Jobs in September

    The private sector added 213,000 jobs last month, according to payroll processor ADP, beating analysts' estimates of 205,000 jobs, which was in line with last month's report.

  • At Work, It's Better to be a Father Than a Mother
    While working mothers struggle with decreased pay and lack of status in a workplace that sees them as unreliable, working fathers enjoy improved status, pay, and benefits that help a growing family survive.
  • If Wages Are Up, Why Are Workers Still Discontent?
    A recent Gallup poll showed that fewer workers are worried about being laid off this year (19 percent, as opposed to 29 percent in 2013). In fact, workers were less worried about job setbacks in general, with fewer respondents citing concerns of cut benefits, hours, and wages. But this doesn't mean that workers are necessarily happy at their jobs.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 142,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 6.1 Percent

    The economy added 142,000 jobs in August, according to this morning's Employment Situation Summary from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, fewer than the 230,000 jobs predicted by economists. The unemployment rate declined slightly to 6.1 percent. Does this report, which is the weakest in six months, indicate signs of slowing job creation?

  • ADP Jobs Report: Economy Added 204,000 Jobs in August

    The private sector added 204,000 jobs last month, according to this morning's ADP National Employment Report, slightly lower than the 215,000 jobs predicted by economists.

  • Is the Skills Gap a Myth?

    In a recent Manpower survey, 40 percent of employers said they had trouble finding qualified applicants for open jobs. On the other hand, David Nicklaus at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch points out, we have a 6.2 percent unemployment rate -- better than the recession, obviously, but still "too high in the sixth year of an economic recovery." How can we account for the simultaneous existence of a high unemployment rate and employers who say they can't find workers qualified for jobs?

  • Here's Why Robots Might Not Take Our Jobs

    Robots have been taking jobs from humans for decades now, replacing bank tellers with ATMs, cashiers with self-checkout machines, and factory workers with mechanized assembly lines. The fear, of course, is that the bots will grow so intelligent -- and low-maintenance from a management perspective -- that they'll replace us altogether. In a recent New York Times column, Neil Irwin explains why that might not be as likely as some naysayers predict. Why? For one thing, robots don't have a lot of common sense.

  • Top 10 Careers of the Future [infographic]

    When you think about futuristic jobs, you probably think of something along the lines of robot scientist (which could mean either a scientist who builds robots, or a scientist who is a robot -- either might apply). But the real jobs of the future probably look a bit more familiar.

  • Franchise Owners Upset About Seattle's Minimum Wage Laws
    Seattle's new minimum wage of $15 per hour is more than twice the current federal minimum wage of $7.25. Some say businesses will suffer and employers will be unable to hire workers. Franchise owners in Seattle have an additional gripe: many are claiming that franchises are unfairly grouped under the umbrella of large businesses.
  • Where Wal-Mart Is Paying More Than Twice Minimum Wage
    If you need a job making $15 to $20 per hour, would you apply at Wal-Mart? If you live in Williston, North Dakota, you just might. The very fact that a company known for underpaying its workers is offering such wages has started some interesting conversations about minimum wage.
  • Is a Jobless Future a Good Thing?
    As technology advances and takes over menial jobs, will we lose jobs or create new ones? Some experts paint a rosy picture of the future in which society does not need as many jobs as we do today.
  • Who Are the Underemployed?

    Unlike unemployment, which is easy to define, underemployment is somewhat subjective. What constitutes not having enough work? PayScale's recent report examined three major reasons why people describe themselves as underemployed: not earning enough money, not using education or training, or not getting full-time hours. Any way you slice the data, it's clear that underemployment is a common problem: Over 40 percent of respondents described themselves as underemployed.

  • The Rise of the Permanent Temporary Worker
    For many job seekers, "temporary work" is a bit of an oxymoron. People looking for permanent positions end up taking whatever they can get, which is often a temporary job for an hourly wage, no benefits, and no job security.
  • Should the US Abolish Tipping?
    The tipping debate rages on. The restaurant industry in the United States relies upon customers tipping for good service in order to pay waiters and waitresses their wages. Servers try to give fast and friendly service in order to be rewarded with additional monies. But does it work?

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