• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Master the Sneaky Job Hunt
    The best time to look for a job might well be when you have a job, but that doesn't mean it's easy to engage in a lengthy interview process while you're still employed. This week's roundup looks at ways to do that without tipping off the boss – or at least, without alienating him or her. Also in the roundup: the never-fail job search tips you're probably ignoring, and ways to include testimonials on your resume, so there's no way hiring managers can miss how impressive you are.
  • Will You Help Me? Why Some Co-Workers Are More Likely to Say Yes Than Others
    Our interactions around the office, and our relationships with our colleagues, are certainly impacted by the corporate ladder and the rung on which we stand at any given point. Some employees might find themselves behaving a little differently with folks who are a few steps higher in the hierarchy when compared with how they act when they're around those who are a few notches below them. People even email differently when communicating with the top. To some extent, all of this is only natural. Of course interactions with higher-ups are a little different than with others. But, could status impact how willing people are to help each other around the office?
  • When the Cost of Living Skyrockets, Teachers Can't Live Where They Work
    You might think that teachers have a pretty good deal, getting the summer off and 12 months of pay to boot, but teachers' compensation is pretty low, especially when it's compared with other professions that require similar levels of education and training. Other public servants, like police officers and firefighters, also opt into a career that, despite its importance, leaves something to be desired in the salary department. But, shouldn't teachers and all public servants who work tirelessly and selflessly to better communities be able to afford to live in the area where they work? Here are a few things to think about.
  • Looking to Switch Careers? Coding May Be Your Answer
    Let's face it: sometimes a career can go stale. When you were 18, you might have been convinced that culinary school was your passion. Or maybe that near-decade of secondary education left you with a PhD that you couldn't care less about. Now, it seems, you might have an out: the tech industry. For those who have the drive and aptitude, a short training program might be the only thing separating you from an $68,000-a-year, entry-level salary – quite a bit better than the usual barista or waitstaff gigs that await folks who switch careers after leaving school.
  • When Being a Working Mom Is the Pits, Here's What You Need to Remember
    Working mothers do indeed have it all – if by "having it all," you mean having both sides of a double-edged sword. Women are still fighting for equal opportunity and equitable pay, so when you pile on the added pressure of balancing a career and family, there's enough guilt there to drive anyone mad … and sad. If you choose (or "choose") to return to work after having a baby, you're going to have to accept that your decision will have its ups and its downs. Here's what you need to know to get through those times when you start to doubt whether you're cut out to be a working mom.
  • 2016 PayScale College ROI Report Shows How Household Income Affects Earnings After Graduation
    The poor often stay poor – even if they're college graduates. This year, for the first time, PayScale's annual College ROI Report looks at how household income prior to attending college relates to income after graduation. In short, students who enter college from lower-income households don't see the same return on their tuition investment as students who start off with more money in their pockets.
  • #WednesdayWisdom: 5 Career Tips From Successful Entrepreneurs
    Whether you're trying to get promoted or start your own business or just figure out what you want to be when you grow up, sometimes there's no substitute for expert advice. And who better to advise you than some of the most successful entrepreneurs, productivity gurus, and businesspeople in the world? Probably you don't have the ability to call up Tim Ferriss or Sheryl Sandberg and ask them what you should do with your life, but you don't need to. Reading their thoughts on their own career trajectories and the lessons they learned along the way might be enough.
  • 3 Career Lessons for Working Women From Hillary Clinton (Even If You're Voting for Someone Else)
    Understatement of the election year: Hillary Clinton is a polarizing figure. For some, she's inspirational – potentially the first female president, a woman who can get things done, the most accomplished candidate in terms of raw political experience. People in this camp tend to say things like, "If the presidential race were a job interview, you'd have to hire her, no question." But, then, of course, there's the other perspective, which says that she's not trustworthy, that she's made bad decisions when it counted, and that she might have broken the law. People who agree with this point of view tend to say things like, "She should be indicted." Today, we're not here to talk about whether either of these takes is right. We're here to talk about Hillary Clinton, the leader, and what working women can learn from her – yes, even if they're voting for Bernie or Cruz or Kasich or Trump, or writing in "Wonder Woman" and calling it a day.
  • Looking for a Job? Request an Uber
    Job hunting can get pretty monotonous: open up your computer, tweak your cover letter, change a bullet point, re-enter your job history, answer a couple of ridiculous questions, and then never hear back. It may seem like the system is set up to keep you from connecting with jobs that really suit you. But what if you could find job listings in places you'd never expect? What if they came to you in the midst of your day-to-day life? It's not as uncommon as you'd think.
  • Want to Negotiate Like a Pro? Use These 2 Unconventional Tactics
    Negotiating is no easy feat, especially when it involves your salary. However, as you know, the squeaky wheel gets the oil, so you better get squeaking if you want to up your salary. Here are a couple tricks of the trade to help you negotiate your way to a heftier paycheck, and do it confidently.
  • Twitter Offers 20 Weeks of Paid Parental Leave for Moms and Dads
    Families were never as "traditional" as politicians or 20th century stereotypes would have us believe. Throughout human history, primary caregivers have come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and ages. Until recently, however, it was pretty hard for even high-earning executives at elite U.S. companies to get paid time off for a new baby – especially if they weren't female and/or hadn't given birth to the child. But all that is changing. Today, Twitter joins the ranks of tech companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Microsoft, in offering fully paid parental leave for any parent who wants time off to care for a new baby.
  • Improve Your Focus by Learning to Ignore Things
    Has the following situation ever happened to you? You come home for the weekend with a ton of work that you need to get done before Monday. But, instead of waking up on Saturday morning and getting right to it, you decide you need to clean up a little first instead. By the time the weekend ends, not only is your work done, but your house is clean, your bills are paid, and your taxes are filed as well. In an effort to procrastinate, you actually ended up being highly productive. If this sounds at all familiar, then you know that attention doesn't always work exactly the way we'd like it to, and you'll be interested in some of these tips regarding focus and productivity. Here's what you need to know.
  • 3 Types of Job Stress, and What to Do About Them
    Work-related stress is all too common these days. Although stress levels, overall, have declined in the last few years, 60 percent of Americans surveyed by the American Psychological Association last year reported feeling stressed because of work. The problem is likely to continue as long as our modern culture of overwork persists.
  • 125 Companies Where Nearly Every Employee Works From Home
    FlexJobs, a job listing site specializing in work-from-home, part-time, contract, and other flexible jobs, is itself a virtual company – all of its employees work from home, telecommuting from around the U.S. So it makes sense that FlexJobs would track virtual companies that offer not just flexibility, but potentially full-time work-from-home situations. Each year, the site puts out a list of the top virtual companies for telecommuters. This year's list contains a whopping 125 employers, up from 76 last year, and 26 the year before.
  • New York State Gets Paid Family Leave, $15 Minimum Wage
    Today, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed legislation that will bring the minimum wage in New York State up to $15 an hour over the course of the next few years, and also provide the most comprehensive paid family leave in the country. The family leave policy, which will phase in starting in 2018, will eventually provide for 12 weeks of paid family leave, capped at 67 percent of the statewide average weekly wage.
  • The U.S. Women's National Soccer Team and the Absurdity of the Gender Pay Gap

    The gender pay gap is a complicated issue. Though it's partly caused by the fact that men are more likely to hold higher-paying jobs, it's also true that women are, on average, paid less for performing the same jobs as men. The solution to the gap is often summed up at its most basic as "equal pay for equal work," meaning assuming all else is equal, a woman performing the same job as a man and achieving the same results should receive the same pay. If that woman outperforms her male counterpart, her salary should increase commensurate with her performance, and vice versa. That's easy to understand. Seems fair. Makes sense. Gender should not factor into pay whatsoever.

    The U.S. Women's National Soccer Team is putting that idea to the test: On Thursday five star players on the team filed a wage-discrimination action against the U.S. Soccer Federation with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

  • #MondayMotivation: 10 Pieces of Wisdom on Optimism From Baseball Players

    Yesterday marked Opening Day, the first day of the MLB season, and the last day every baseball fan starts off their morning filled with hope. Traditionally, by the end of the day, some of the more Eeyore-like fans have transitioned from, "Maybe this is our year," to, "This year will be an epic disaster." You're more likely to be one of those if your team lost one of the three games played yesterday, but it's not impossible to develop a glass-half-empty approach even if they didn't play at all. Trust me on this: I'm from Boston.

    As much fun as it is to be a cynic, too much pessimism isn't really good for you. Concentrating on the negative can impact your health, happiness, and even your career. Fortunately, baseball offers a cure, as well as means to develop the disease.

  • 5 Workers on the Best and Worst Parts of Their Commute
    Commuting is expensive, annoying, and might even impact your health. Still, unless we manage to score work-from-home jobs for our whole careers or win the lottery, most of us will wind up doing it at some time or another. Whether our commute stays a minor irritation or becomes a major stumbling block to our happiness in both personal and professional life depends on a number of factors, including personal preference, traffic patterns, and whether we're able to convince the boss to let us have a flexible schedule.
  • Unplug From Social Media, Get Productivity-Enhancing Zzzs
    We're learning more and more about the importance of a getting enough sleep. The quality and quantity of our sleep has an impact on our health, our relationships, mood, memory, the clarity of our thinking ... the list goes on and on. So, if you aim to take good (or even decent) care of yourself, sleep is something that really should be a priority.
  • The PayScale Index Shows Annual Wage Growth of 1.8 Percent for Q1
    Are wages growing? It depends on what industry you're in. The PayScale Index, which measures the change in wages for employed U.S. workers, updated this morning, reflecting 1.8 percent annual growth across all industries for the first quarter. Quarterly growth, however, was 0.2 percent, and some sectors fared better than others. For example, while wages grew 4.6 percent for transportation jobs, they declined 2.2 percent for marketing and advertising jobs.

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