• Job Growth Hits Higher-Wage Occupations

    The majority of jobs lost during the recession were mid-wage jobs, i.e. jobs paying between $13.83 and $21.13 an hour. As of March 2013, 58 percent of jobs gained during the recovery were low-paying, in industries like food service and retail. But that might be in the process of changing: the past two job reports from the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed increases in higher-paying industries like construction and business and professional services.

  • Do These 5 Things Before Your Next Interview and Get the Job

    Interview prep is tricky not because you don't know what to do to get ready, but because you know too much about what you could do. Before you get bogged down in endless practice interview questions, make sure you have these things checked off your pre-interview to-do list.

  • How Dangerous Is Your Office?

    At companies like Nestle and Chevron, safety is serious business. How serious? At the former, The Wall Street Journal reports, workers start meetings by looking for tripping hazards like stray extension cords; at the latter, employees can present a "stop work" card to halt activities, if they feel that a situation is unsafe. Other companies warn workers to beware of hazards like high heels, hot coffee, and carrying too many things while walking down stairs. Is all of this really beneficial to employees, or is it a (cautious, measured) step too far?

  • BLS Jobs Report: 209,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 6.2 Percent

    The economy added 209,000 jobs last month, according to today's Employment Situation Summary, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Unemployment ticked up to 6.2 percent from 6.1 percent in June.

  • Don't Hate Corporate Jargon

    If standup comics still did '80s-style comedy specials, corporate jargon would be their new airplane food, the easy target for mild jokes to unspool effortlessly while wearing shoulder pads and standing in front of a brick wall. Heck, even for us contemporary worker bees, it's hard to resist the urge to mock the office buzzwords. We have to have something to do, in between proactively navigating on-ramp processes and leveraging new solutions. But is it possible that business lingo is worth more than a laugh?

  • 3 Career Lessons From the OkCupid Human Experiments

    Christian Rudder, founder of OkCupid, recently admitted in a blog post that the dating site experiments on human beings. Before you envision the Bride of Frankenstein, or even Facebook's emotional manipulation studies, relax: OkCupid's experiments were a bit more lighthearted, not mention obvious, than the usual dark-side-of-data-science horror stories we've come to fear. Even better, they might teach us something about how people communicate online -- even if their goal is, say, getting a new job, rather than finding a mate.

  • ADP Jobs Report: Economy Added 218,000 Jobs in July

    The private sector added 218,000 jobs last month, according to the latest ADP National Employment Report, less than the 230,000 jobs predicted by economists.

  • Wages on the Rise in Some Industries

    Recent data from the Labor Department shows wage growth in several sectors, including construction, retail, and leisure and hospitality. Together with three months of job reports in the 200,000-plus range, could these statistics mean that the economy is headed in the right direction, at last?

  • Coder Livetweets Alleged IBM Execs Discussing Why They Won't Hire Women

    Toronto editor and coder Lyndsay Kirkham just wanted to go out to lunch for her birthday. What she got was an earful of mansplanation, courtesy of conversation of the alleged IBM executives at the next table, about why young women are bad hires. (Short version: they keep getting a case of the babies.)

  • How Much Money Do You Need to Make, in Order to Feel Like a Success?

    Whoever said money doesn't buy happiness never tried to pay their mortgage armed with only a positive attitude. Most of us need a certain amount of financial security in order to be satisfied. A recent CareerBuilder survey translates that into dollars and cents: $75,000, it turns out, is the magic number. But this doesn't mean earning that salary will necessarily make all workers feel successful.

  • 3 Career Lessons From Weird Al Yankovic

    It's Weird Al's world; the rest of us are just living in it. This week, his album Mandatory Fun hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts, #8days8videos blew up on Twitter, and everyone's co-workers and Facebook friends began posting links to Tacky and Word Crimes. Speaking of which, it became apparent that Weird Al's goal might not purely be to amuse us. It's clear that there's a lot to learn from the man who started his career with Dr. Demento as a mentor.

  • Is It Possible to Have Too Many Skills?

    When you think about what might keep you from getting hired for your dream job, you probably never consider the possibility that your issue might be too many skills, instead of too few. But broad experience over a range of different areas can sometimes work against you in the eyes of a hiring manager.

  • 40 Percent of American Workers Would Quit, If Not for Health Insurance

    On dark days, when your job gets you down, what stops you from handing in your letter of resignation? For 40 percent of workers, a recent study finds, it's health insurance -- specifically, health insurance that doesn't cost more or provide less than the plan they have through their employers.

  • Should You Share Your Salary With Your Co-workers?

    Salary transparency is hot right now. More companies are revealing what workers make, in the hopes that it will increase trust, improve productivity, even minimize the gender pay gap. But that doesn't meant that sharing salaries is totally without peril for employees.

  • This CEO Thinks Recent Grads Don't Need Work-Life Balance

    Backupify CEO Rob May has some advice for folks just starting out in their careers: forget about work-life balance. To get ahead while you're young, he says, you have be prepared to take jobs you don't like, work harder than everyone else, and essentially leave having a life for later on.

  • 5 Times You Should Delegate Tasks

    Do you feel like you need to do everything at work yourself, or it won't get done the right way? Chances are, you're overextending yourself, compromising both your productivity and your happiness in your career. So when should you pass the baton, and when should you keep running for the finish line?

  • 3 Ways to Calm Down in a Hurry

    It's an unfortunate fact of life: the times in your career when you need to be the most levelheaded are also the times when you're least likely to be feeling calm, cool, and collected. Whether it's a big presentation in front of colleagues from another office, or a scary meeting with the boss about a deliverable that didn't get delivered, dealing more positively with anxiety can mean the difference between turning a tricky situation to your advantage and making things worse.

  • Which College Majors Study the Most? [infographic]

    The average student spends 17 hours a week preparing for class, according to The National Survey of Student Engagement. That includes studying, reading, analyzing data, and doing assignments and lab work. That's far less than the 45 or so hours per week recommended by most schools for students taking 15 credits of coursework, but not every major is equal when it comes to study time.

  • Microsoft EVP Stephen Elop's Layoff Memo: By the Way, You Might Not Have a Job Next Year

    Yesterday, the hinted-at changes in Microsoft's workforce took shape and heft, to the tune of 18,000 job cuts over the next year. The figure represents about 14 percent of Microsoft's workforce. The majority of those cuts, 12,500 jobs, will come in Microsoft's devices and services unit, which absorbed Nokia last year. How did workers in the mobile unit discover this? In the eleventh paragraph of a memo from former Nokia CEO and current Microsoft executive vice president Stephen Elop.

  • Fewer Freshman College Students Returning for Sophomore Year

    The rate of first-time college students returning for their sophomore year in 2013 dropped 1.2 percentage points, compared with the entering class of 2009, according to a new report from The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. The retention rate, however remained about the same, meaning that college students who left school were more likely to drop out entirely, and less likely to leave one school in order to enroll somewhere else.