• Happy Workers Love Their Mothers

    Did you know your mother follows you to work? Well, she may not actually be following you to your desk, but her influence does. A recent study found that mothers play a unique role in what kind of worker you become. It turns out that a strong relationship with your mom may cause you to be less focused on money, and more focused on finding meaning and purpose in what you do.

  • Another Benefit of a Shorter Work Day: A Better Commute
    The Swedish city of Gothenberg recently rolled out a 6.5-hour work day to some of its municipal workers, in a year-long study aimed at boosting worker productivity and job satisfaction. Over at LinkedIn, Rick Johnson argues that a shorter work day would offer another perk to stressed-out workers: less time on the road, traveling to and from work.
  • Obama May Sign Executive Order Protecting Gay People in the Workplace
    Currently, there is no federal law protecting gays and lesbians against discrimination. Twenty-one states have enacted such protections, but in the remaining 29 states, employers may, for example, fire an employee for being gay.
  • Starbucks Offers Free Online College Classes to Employees

    Want to get that bachelor's degree you’ve always wanted, but couldn’t afford? Become a barista. The Starbucks Corporation announced Monday that it's going to finance online degrees for employees via Arizona State University. The Starbucks College Achievement Plan, the first of its kind, will be available to U.S. Starbucks employees working at least 20 hours a week.

  • The Future of Minimum Wage: More Money, But No More One-Size-Fits-All

    At the beginning of the month, Seattle's city council voted unanimously to increase the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour in stages over the next three to seven years. To get a business owner's perspective on the issue, we spoke via email with John Pepper, co-founder and former CEO of Boloco, a Boston-based restaurant chain with 22 units across New England. Pepper told us a bit about why a higher minimum wage isn't necessarily bad for business and what else needs to change for small businesses to thrive while paying their workers higher wages.

  • College Enrollment Is Dropping and That's Not a Bad Thing

    According to a recent report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, some older students are actually leaving school to return to an improving job market. Since last year, enrollment dropped by 0.8 percent; over the previous year, enrollment declined 2.3 percent.

  • College Grads: Hiring to Increase Nearly 9 Percent

    The Class of 2014 may not have to don fast food uniforms after the caps and gowns come off. Employers that hire new grads are feeling optimistic about the market and plan to hire 8.6 percent more college graduates this year as compared to last. Starting salaries for this year's class are also up by 1.2 percent, all this according to a recent survey released by The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

  • Did Harvard Punish Student Entrepreneurs or Teach Them How Business Really Works?
    Two savvy freshmen at Harvard University are making headlines. They started a potentially successful business on campus, but the real media attention focused on the reaction of the university.
  • Why Obama's Executive Order Against Pay Secrecy Matters

    On April 8, 2014, President Obama signed the Non-Retaliation for Disclosure of Compensation Information into law. This executive order prohibits federal contractors from retaliating against workers who discuss their wages and salaries, but even if you don't work for the government, it's part of a trend that could affect your working life.

  • Some NFL Cheerleaders Earn Less Than Minimum Wage
    Most of us don't work in exchange for perks. Instead, we agree to pay that equals at least the minimum wage and expect to be paid for hours worked. Unless, of course, you are a cheerleader. Recent lawsuits brought against several NFL teams are shedding light on the alleged exploitation of women who are employed as cheerleaders.
  • Rakesh Agrawal Gripes About PayPal Colleagues on Twitter

    On Friday night and early Saturday morning, PayPal's Director of Strategy Rakesh Agrawal quit his job and then made several tweets expressing his opinions about his former colleagues at the company. They were not positive, nor were they coherently expressed, even by 140-character standards.

  • Big Surprise: Raising the Minimum Wage Is Good for the Economy
    Opponents of raising the minimum wage continue to scream that paying working class people higher wages will destroy the economy and the American way of capitalistic freedom will end. We have hard evidence that this is simply not true.
  • Tell Me Your Salary, I'll Tell You Mine
    If you were absolutely sure your boss couldn't retaliate against you for revealing your salary to your co-workers, would you tell? Thanks to improved worker protections, we might soon find out.
  • The Harvard Handout: Wealthy Donors Giving Big Money to Already Rich Colleges
    Recently, Slate's Matthew Yglesias argued against donating large amounts of money to wealthy schools like Harvard University. His position is that Ivy League schools already have huge endowments, and that most of the students attending these elite schools have wealthy families supporting them financially.
  • Top College Admissions Rates Have Fallen
    The news about top colleges and universities accepting fewer and fewer applicants each year may be alarming, but it is also complicated. Instead of giving up, take critical look at how and why this is happening.
  • Are Women Better Leaders of Ethnically Diverse Countries?

    Companies rightly want ethnically diverse teams, to reflect the population of the countries that make up their customer base. But governing an ethnically diverse country is not without its challenges. A new study takes a look at the role of gender in successful leadership, and finds that the countries that pull off both economic success and diversity all have one variable in common: a female head of state.

  • Swedes Give 6-Hour Workday a Try

    Sweden offers one of the most generous maternity leave policies in the world and when its citizens want to criticize unfair work policies, they apparently do so in viral videos. If that weren't enough to make you think about moving, here's the latest work-friendly policy in action: municipal staff in Gothenburg, Sweden's second-largest city, are test-driving a six-hour work day -- for the same pay as an eight-hour day.

  • The Rise of the Permanent, Unpaid Intern
    Unpaid internships were designed for students to get valuable training outside of the classroom. Some professions require supervised internship hours toward graduation and licensure. Unfortunately, the internship seems to have evolved into a default position that job seekers take to avoid not having anything at all. This is a problem, and it is also in some cases illegal.
  • Obama Announces $600M Job-Training Initiative

    During a visit to a community college in Oakdale, Pennsylvania, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden announced an initiative to create job training programs, including apprenticeships. The initiative will focus on training workers to fill jobs for which there's currently a shortage of skilled applicants, and will rely on existing Labor Department funds.

  • Conservatives Want YOU to Go Without Healthcare
    The Affordable Care Act is now law, and in spite of the various technical glitches, Americans have been signing up, so that they may enjoy access to healthcare when they get sick. For some people, this may be the first time they have ever had health insurance. Now, there is a push from conservatives to change the definition of the full-time work week to get employers who do not want to offer benefits off the hook.