• The Sometimes Surprising Truth About the Value of the Minimum Wage

    The real value of the minimum wage is going down. Ten different charts on two different websites paint the same picture of how the relative value of the minimum wage has declined over time. In short, when you take inflation and cost of living data into account, minimum-wage workers can buy less for their earnings than they could a few years ago.

  • Are Prevailing Wage Laws Discriminatory?
    If you work as a contractor on projects with federal funding, prevailing wage laws may be pertinent to your rate of pay. An opinion piece published in the Albuqurque Journal makes the argument that "prevailing wage" laws are discriminatory. Understand what these laws say and how they affect you.
  • What You Need to Know About Your Employer's Social Media Policy and the Law

    The National Law Review recently reported that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) reached a settlement with Georgia-Pacific over their social media policy. This is big for just about anybody who works. As always, the law is trying to catch up with changes in technology and society. The details of this case help inform employees and their employers which businesses may and may not regulate regarding employees' personal use of social media.

  • 3 Ways to Manage Your Difficult Boss

    Americans who work full-time may spend more time interacting with co-workers and managers than with their own family and friends. Their relationships at work, however, are far different than with trusted friends. When bosses are difficult people, workers often do not have the freedom to confront them or to demand to be treated with common courtesy. For those employees who are not lucky enough to work for polite people, these three strategies may help them maintain their sanity.

  • 5 Signs Your Workplace Is Psychologically Unhealthy
    Work is work, and most adults understand that they need not be best friends with their co-workers and managers. We go to work to utilize specific skills, do a good job, and receive compensation. We are not there to sing kumbaya and give each other warm fuzzies. However, there is such as thing as a toxic workplace. If your workplace shows a majority of these five signs of toxicity, you may be working in a psychologically unhealthy environment.
  • 3 Tips to Position Yourself for a Promotion

    If you're angling for a promotion, it's not enough to work hard and do your job well. Here's how to improve your chances.

  • Worker's Compensation Might Not Cover You
    The devil is in the details. Many workers arrive at work ready to do a good job in return for compensation, plus their employer's attention to their health and safety on the job. How a state frames worker's compensation laws, however, may leave injured workers without benefits.
  • How to Survive in a Toxic Work Environment
    While your job may meet your financial needs, not all workplaces meet people's basic, psychological needs. Some workplaces are downright toxic. Since you probably can't just leave, learn how to survive and keep your sanity until the day comes when you have a better offer.
  • Women's Dress Code for Getting a Promotion or Raise
    We all have days when we look in the closet and wonder how we are going to survive until we can do laundry. Depending upon where you work, this may be more or less of a problem. Some office dress codes are casual enough that if you have nothing clean but a pair of jeans, you can wear them to work. Regardless of how formal or casual your office, however, there are stricter rules for dress when you are trying to move forward in your career, get a promotion, or receive a raise. When you are ready to ask for a raise or a promotion, plan ahead and wear the outfit that will help you get what you are asking for.
  • Paint Your Office Walls the Best Colors for Productivity

    Color schemes in any office help set the mood or tone of the business. Forbes has a wonderful color wheel that indicates the different psychological moods that colors evoke. If you have the opportunity to paint your office walls or to change the color schemes where you work, consider how you wish to influence your co-workers and clients.

  • 3 Ways to Maximize Your Lunch Break
    Instead of eating at your desk, taking a little break and getting some fresh air during the day may help relieve stress and reduce afternoon fatigue. Make the most of your lunch break. Following are just three ways you can maximize your time off in the middle of the day.
  • 3 Things Employers Won't Tell You About Social Media
    By now, we've all heard stories about people being fired for their social media use, either because they got caught tweeting on the company time, or because they said something outside of work, that tarnished their employer's brand. But there's more to the perils of social media than just saying the wrong thing at the wrong time. Here's what your employer knows about social media that might surprise you.
  • Work at Home? Here's How to Avoid an Audit
    The Consumerist has a helpful list of tax tips to follow to avoid being audited by the IRS. Some of these sage pieces of advice are relevant to people who work at home, or who run home-based businesses. If you work at home, take heed of these three things when reporting your income.
  • Wisconsin and the 7-Day Work Week
    Governor of Wisconsin Scott Walker has bragged that his state went from the 43rd best state in which to do business to the 17th during his tenure.That is a big improvement over the course of four short years. While business owners in Wisconsin may be enjoying an improved environment, we must ask what makes Wisconsin business-friendly, and whether those traits create an unfriendly environment for workers or residents. In the long run, what is bad for employees may also be bad for business.
  • Radical Idea in Education Might Save Students Money
    The University of Minnesota Rochester (UMR) has implemented some radical ideas in higher education and, so far, it seems they are successful. They want to hire teachers who want to teach, and enroll students who want to learn. Sounds simple enough, although other colleges and universities sometimes fail to achieve this. The icing on the cake, so to speak, is that UMR costs less than traditional schools.
  • 4 Ways to Cope if You Lose Your Job Tomorrow
    We spend more time at our jobs than we do cultivating personal relationships, and similar to relationships, our jobs are important parts of our lives and often define a large part of who we are. Losing a job is similar to breaking up, and the coping mechanisms necessary to survive the transition address so much more than simply knowing how to budget severance pay or updating your resume.
  • Your Favorite Football Team Might Be Guilty of Wage Theft
    Whether you're a fan of the Raiders or some other football team, the abuses alleged in the recent class-action lawsuit filed in Alameda County Superior Court may be more common than the football industry cares to admit. The suit alleges not only the usual wage theft violations such as no overtime pay, but a laundry list of patronizing and insulting, not to mention illegal, requirements that would cause any feminist to wonder at our lack of progress over the last century.
  • Executive Presence Leads to Executive Careers
    You may have the necessary education and expertise to become an executive, but do you have executive presence? The way we present ourselves goes way beyond wearing a power tie or a navy blue skirt and blazer. Having or developing certain interpersonal skills and presence are necessary if you wish to become a leader.
  • New Worker Co-ops Lead to Economic Prosperity

    The newest incarnation of worker cooperatives are worker self-directed enterprises (WSDE). WSDEs combine aspects of capitalism and socialism, resulting in an improved version of a centuries-old idea. Not only do the workers decide together when and how much to produce, but they themselves choose, via a democratic process, how to use the enterprise's net revenue. Suddenly, government agencies dependent upon enterprise tax payments become dependent not upon the CEOs, but on the workers themselves.

  • Does Your State Want to Raise the Minimum Wage?

    PayScale's recent survey indicates which state populations are in favor of raising the minimum wage to a full $15 per hour. Do you live in a state that is fighting to raise the minimum wage?