• Should Your Internship Be Paid?

    Getting that coveted internship is an exciting time for any graduate student on her way toward graduation and professional employment. Sometimes an internship is a valuable training experience that readies the student for real-world challenges in her field; other times, it is the equivalent of feudal serfdom. Internships can be unpaid, and as such are subject to strict laws and boundaries under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA.) Spot the warning signs and tell the difference between true professionals who are willing to help train you, and unscrupulous employers who simply want to take advantage of slave labor.

  • 3 Memory Tricks to Become Smarter and More Productive

    Improving our memory skills increases productivity at work and, in general, makes our lives a little easier. From remembering where we stashed our keys to remembering the boss's detailed instructions, the following tips and tricks will make us work smarter and be more productive. How many of these are you familiar with?

  • Tweetenfreude: How Following People We Love to Hate Can Help Our Careers

    Can hate-following be good for your career? It can, if you do it the right way. "Tweetenfreude," coined by Saya Weissman at Digiday, refers to the charge we get out of following people we dislike. While it might seem like a waste of time and productivity, there are some surprising ways to make the hate-follow work for you and your job.

  • President Obama Wants YOU to Receive Overtime Pay

    Good news coming down the pike for the millions of American workers who have been exempted from overtime pay. The New York Times reports that tomorrow, Thursday, March 13, President Obama will direct the federal Department of Labor to stop classifying a series of jobs as "professional" or "executive." How will this affect you?

  • Those Unpaid Security Screenings Might Not Be Legal

    Does your employer require you to go through a security screening before you go on the clock? If so, they might be breaking the law -- but if they are, they're not alone. Employees who work for companies that require security screenings often are not compensated for time spent being screened. Just a few years ago, groups of employees started filing suit against their employers for wage theft. Their basic argument was, of course, that they should be compensated for time given to the employer. If you are ever expected to give up your time without being compensated, here is what you need to know.

  • Is a Career in Positive Psychology Right for You?
    Positive psychology, the study of what makes life worth living, is one of the newest branches of the social sciences. According to positive psychology, we have the ability to create and determine happiness, which is a thing in itself, and not just the absence of depression. Sound empowering? Positive psychology is making its way into corporate environments, which is good news if you're a worker of any sort, or interested in getting involved in a career using positive psychology in the workplace.
  • Employer Access to Social Media Accounts: What Does Your State Say?
    The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCLS) keeps tabs on what's new in each of the 50 states. Beginning in 2012, some state lawmakers introduced legislation protecting employees from being required to give up their social media account passwords in order to get or keep a job. And some states included laws preventing colleges and universities from requiring student passwords.
  • How to Avoid (Unintentionally) Insulting Your Colleagues

    Passive-aggression at work is bad for everyone involved. It's not very different from yelling or bullying. But what about when you insult co-workers, with no intention of doing so? An objective examination of behavior, not intent, sheds light on how this happens, and how you can prevent being misunderstood.

  • Too Much Vulnerability Is Counterproductive

    How much vulnerability is too much? A recent article in Psychology Today discusses how our interpersonal dynamics in the workplace have changed over the years. The pendulum swings back and forth on the issue of vulnerability.

  • 3 Ways to Show You Are Not a Victim

    Working on a team sometimes gets frustrating. People don't always see eye to eye, and stronger personalities may be more likely to get their way. People who are able to speak up, be heard, and make compelling and appropriate arguments will send less-bold types scurrying for cover. If you work with strong personalities, don't agree to stay in the shadows.

  • Show Kindness to Co-workers as a Networking Strategy

    While it seems disingenuous to be nice to somebody only because you want something from them, the old adage "what goes around, comes around" remains true. If you are nice to people you work with, you may find yourself being rewarded in various ways, such as being chosen for a special project that is worth more money, just because people think you are nice to work with. Being kind to others may be part of an overall networking strategy.

  • 3 Reasons You Should Journal About Your Job

    Keeping a journal can help you make note of important events, remember them, and learn from them, as well as organize your thoughts and deal with important issues. Journaling helps you work toward your goals. It's a useful tool for those who are interested in professional growth.

  • Pentagon Food Service Workers Allege Illegal Retaliation for Strike Against Contractor Employer
    Recently, The Huffington Post reported that food service workers in the Pentagon filed a complaint against their private-sector employer. They say that they were illegally retaliated against in response to asserting their right to protest for better working conditions.
  • Maximize Teamwork and Get the Most Out of Your Team
    Some group dynamics consistently help generate productivity among team members, while other dynamics consistently squash creativity and active participation among team members. Whether you are a leader or a member, you may use this knowledge to help your group be the best it can be.
  • The Sometimes Surprising Truth About the Value of the Minimum Wage

    The real value of the minimum wage is going down. Ten different charts on two different websites paint the same picture of how the relative value of the minimum wage has declined over time. In short, when you take inflation and cost of living data into account, minimum-wage workers can buy less for their earnings than they could a few years ago.

  • Are Prevailing Wage Laws Discriminatory?
    If you work as a contractor on projects with federal funding, prevailing wage laws may be pertinent to your rate of pay. An opinion piece published in the Albuqurque Journal makes the argument that "prevailing wage" laws are discriminatory. Understand what these laws say and how they affect you.
  • What You Need to Know About Your Employer's Social Media Policy and the Law

    The National Law Review recently reported that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) reached a settlement with Georgia-Pacific over their social media policy. This is big for just about anybody who works. As always, the law is trying to catch up with changes in technology and society. The details of this case help inform employees and their employers which businesses may and may not regulate regarding employees' personal use of social media.

  • 3 Ways to Manage Your Difficult Boss

    Americans who work full-time may spend more time interacting with co-workers and managers than with their own family and friends. Their relationships at work, however, are far different than with trusted friends. When bosses are difficult people, workers often do not have the freedom to confront them or to demand to be treated with common courtesy. For those employees who are not lucky enough to work for polite people, these three strategies may help them maintain their sanity.

  • 5 Signs Your Workplace Is Psychologically Unhealthy
    Work is work, and most adults understand that they need not be best friends with their co-workers and managers. We go to work to utilize specific skills, do a good job, and receive compensation. We are not there to sing kumbaya and give each other warm fuzzies. However, there is such as thing as a toxic workplace. If your workplace shows a majority of these five signs of toxicity, you may be working in a psychologically unhealthy environment.
  • 3 Tips to Position Yourself for a Promotion

    If you're angling for a promotion, it's not enough to work hard and do your job well. Here's how to improve your chances.