• 5 Small Changes That Will Make You Better at Your Job

    The internet teems with ideas on how to improve your performance at work, but most of the time, the advice focuses on big changes: taking a class or an entire degree, adopting an entirely new system for dealing with emails or tasks, or just plain changing your nature. Fortunately, there are plenty of little things you can do to be better at what you.

  • The Importance of Reviewing Your Boss

    If your company has recently started doing 360 reviews -- where the managed offer feedback to the manager -- you might be a little nervous. After all, even if it's anonymous, isn't it dangerous to review the boss?

  • 3 Reasons Why You Should Be Nicer to Yourself

    When you listen to your inner voice, is it mean to you? If so, you're not alone. Many people go through their days hearing an internal litany of self-criticism. The problem, of course, is that it's hard to get anything positive done at work while you're tuned into negativity.

  • 3 Ways to Deal With a Difficult Boss

    Think about your least favorite jobs. Odds are, your boss was partly to blame. Bad managers are the number one reason people leave their jobs. Of course, if you're not quite at the point where you can turn in your resignation, you'll need to figure out ways to make your situation more tolerable.

  • How Sharing Mistakes Can Strengthen Your Company

    Most of us spend our careers trying to avoid making mistakes -- and failing that, trying to hide them. The problem with this way of doing business, of course, is that it makes it hard to fix errors, and even harder to learn from them.

  • Become a 'Math Person' and a Success at Work

    The fastest way to talk yourself out of a successful career is to hold fast to the idea that you're "not a math person," and yet many workers do just that. Why? Because they believe that people are either good at something, or they're not -- even though evidence strongly suggests otherwise.

  • Bad Managers Are the No. 1 Reason People Leave Their Jobs

    What does it take to make an employee leave a job voluntarily, in a tough economy? A bad boss.

  • Be Indispensable to Your Boss

    Unemployment is slowing improving, but that doesn't mean that workers' fear of getting laid off is also on the decline. The best way to achieve job security these days is to make yourself essential personnel in the eyes of your boss.

  • How to Deal With a Jealous Coworker

    What is it about the office environment that brings out the mean girl (or boy) in some people? Years after we've graduated from high school, we still sometimes have to put up with juvenile behavior from our coworkers.

  • How to Fake Confidence in 5 Easy Steps

    Confidence is important, whether you're interviewing for a new job or trying to get promoted at the one you already have. Even if you're completely happy where you are on the corporate ladder, being confident will help you persuade other people to support you, which is essential for getting buy-in for your projects and achieving your goals. But what if you're not a naturally confident person?

  • What Managers Can Learn From the World's Best Coach
    If you're not a soccer fan, you might know the name Alex Ferguson, but not fully realize his greatness. He's the best coach of any sport of the last 20 years. His unique ability to get the most of his employees should be studied by all managers.
  • Have You Committed Any of These 7 Deadly Career Sins?

    Forget wrath, sloth, and greed -- the workplace has its own deadly sins, according to career experts at The Sydney Morning Herald. Their list of unforgivable office transgressions is food for thought for any working person.

  • Employees Would Prefer Boss Who Is a High-Achiever, Rather Than Nice

    Today is National Boss's Day, which makes it a perfect time to ask employees which qualities they most desire in a boss. The Workforce Institute at Kronos is here to oblige. Through an online survey administered by Harris Interactive, they asked over 4000 workers in the U.S., Australia, and India what they wanted in a manager. Some of the results were surprising.

  • Failure Is the Secret to Dilbert Creator's Success

    If you've done time in a cubicle farm, you're familiar with Dilbert, the flat-topped, curly-tie-wearing avatar of white-collar drudgery. But what you might not know is that his creator, cartoonist Scott Adams, failed a lot on the road to success.

  • 3 Career Lessons From Amy Poehler

    Amy Poehler is an inspiration for a lot of working women, based solely on her performance as the resilient government administrator Leslie Knope on the sitcom Parks and Recreation. But her professional life also offers plenty of insight for both men and women who want to be successful while also being true to themselves.

  • CEOs Swap Roles for One Week

    What happens when two tech CEOs swap jobs? Rand Fishkin of Moz and Wil Reynolds of SEER Interactive are finding that out as we speak. Until tomorrow, they'll be doing each other's jobs at their company HQs in Seattle and Philadelphia.

  • Bad Choices Can Impact Your Career

    Everyone makes mistakes, but some bad choices are harder to come back from than others, career-wise. Take the mistakes of former "Grey's Anatomy" cast member Isaiah Washington.

  • The Older We Get, the More Inspired We Are by Work

    This summer, LinkedIn polled its members to find out how inspired they are by their jobs. Among the interesting insights in the initial results: older workers are more inspired than younger ones.

  • How Not to Accept Criticism

    The customer is always right -- unless you're the CEO. The recent dust-up between Uber, a company that has created an app that connects passengers and car services, and Bridget Todd, a writer and activist who says that she was choked by a driver she ordered through Uber's app, shows that high-level executives sometimes know less about accepting criticism than their reports lower on the corporate ladder.

  • Here's How to Eat Healthier When You Work at Home

    When you first started working at home -- either full time, or a day or two a week -- you thought it would be the solution to all your bad habits. No longer would you be stuck trying to squeeze in gym time during a half-hour lunch, or choose the least awful snack out of the vending machine. Then you began your WAHing ways, and now the office looks positively healthy by comparison. What gives?