• Rakesh Agrawal Gripes About PayPal Colleagues on Twitter

    On Friday night and early Saturday morning, PayPal's Director of Strategy Rakesh Agrawal quit his job and then made several tweets expressing his opinions about his former colleagues at the company. They were not positive, nor were they coherently expressed, even by 140-character standards.

  • Big Surprise: Raising the Minimum Wage Is Good for the Economy
    Opponents of raising the minimum wage continue to scream that paying working class people higher wages will destroy the economy and the American way of capitalistic freedom will end. We have hard evidence that this is simply not true.
  • Tell Me Your Salary, I'll Tell You Mine
    If you were absolutely sure your boss couldn't retaliate against you for revealing your salary to your co-workers, would you tell? Thanks to improved worker protections, we might soon find out.
  • The Harvard Handout: Wealthy Donors Giving Big Money to Already Rich Colleges
    Recently, Slate's Matthew Yglesias argued against donating large amounts of money to wealthy schools like Harvard University. His position is that Ivy League schools already have huge endowments, and that most of the students attending these elite schools have wealthy families supporting them financially.
  • Top College Admissions Rates Have Fallen
    The news about top colleges and universities accepting fewer and fewer applicants each year may be alarming, but it is also complicated. Instead of giving up, take critical look at how and why this is happening.
  • Are Women Better Leaders of Ethnically Diverse Countries?

    Companies rightly want ethnically diverse teams, to reflect the population of the countries that make up their customer base. But governing an ethnically diverse country is not without its challenges. A new study takes a look at the role of gender in successful leadership, and finds that the countries that pull off both economic success and diversity all have one variable in common: a female head of state.

  • Swedes Give 6-Hour Workday a Try

    Sweden offers one of the most generous maternity leave policies in the world and when its citizens want to criticize unfair work policies, they apparently do so in viral videos. If that weren't enough to make you think about moving, here's the latest work-friendly policy in action: municipal staff in Gothenburg, Sweden's second-largest city, are test-driving a six-hour work day -- for the same pay as an eight-hour day.

  • The Rise of the Permanent, Unpaid Intern
    Unpaid internships were designed for students to get valuable training outside of the classroom. Some professions require supervised internship hours toward graduation and licensure. Unfortunately, the internship seems to have evolved into a default position that job seekers take to avoid not having anything at all. This is a problem, and it is also in some cases illegal.
  • Obama Announces $600M Job-Training Initiative

    During a visit to a community college in Oakdale, Pennsylvania, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden announced an initiative to create job training programs, including apprenticeships. The initiative will focus on training workers to fill jobs for which there's currently a shortage of skilled applicants, and will rely on existing Labor Department funds.

  • Conservatives Want YOU to Go Without Healthcare
    The Affordable Care Act is now law, and in spite of the various technical glitches, Americans have been signing up, so that they may enjoy access to healthcare when they get sick. For some people, this may be the first time they have ever had health insurance. Now, there is a push from conservatives to change the definition of the full-time work week to get employers who do not want to offer benefits off the hook.
  • New Aid for Undocumented Students: Which Schools Offer the Best ROI?
    Washington State recently became the fifth state to enact legislation offering financial aid to students who arrived in the country illegally by way of their parents. Now that college is within reach of a new population, finding the right school for the money becomes the next hurdle.
  • Maybe He Shouldn't Go to Jared: Female Workers File Complaint Against Jewelry Chain

    A typical ad for Jared's jewelery stores shows women melting with gratitude after being presented the one thing that every woman, wants, in the world of advertising, if nowhere else -- a mined rock. According to some female employees of the chain, however, working for the company is less than a dream come true.

  • Why Do Graduates Leave Their State?
    Public colleges and universities rely heavily on state funding in order to offer affordable classes to their student body. However, in some states, that same student body leaves after graduation, essentially causing the public system of higher education to invest in the workforce for other states. The reasons for this are complex and surprising; it certainly requires more than a quick fix.
  • When Are Creative Job Applications Too Creative?
    You may have heard by now about Leah the Lego figurine. Leah is the perfect Account Service Intern, complete with a blue suit and sensible shoes. She made her debut applying for positions at advertising agencies. It's an attention-getting idea; and the first step in getting a job is getting noticed. But will it work?
  • Wealthier Schools Admit Fewer Students With Pell Grants

    Payscale's latest college ROI report uncovers a disturbing trend in higher education for low income students. Wealthier schools with the highest ROI may not be serving those who are eligible for federal monies to help pay their way.

  • Union Leaders Are Exempt From the Law in Pennsylvania -- For Now

    The benefits of union membership are numerous, but unions were never conceived to give members or leaders the right to break criminal laws. Pennsylvania's House of Representatives just recently passed a bill that is as necessary as it is surprising.

  • The Department of Labor Has Your Back

    The federal Department of Labor (DOL) budget for fiscal year 2015 is official, and it includes new programs and additional protections for workers and employees. This is exciting news for millions of Americans, including the long-term unemployed, students who want to work when they graduate, and current employees whose employers may not be following the law as they should. Check out the changes that are being put in place to help you.

  • Woman Denied Lactation Room and Fired Is Not Getting Trial

    "I think it's best you go home and be with your babies" is not what an employee expects to hear upon returning to work after maternity leave. Unfortunately, it is exactly what Angela Ames heard when she requested access to a lactation room to express breast milk. Ms. Ames filed to sue for sexual discrimination, but has been denied access to a trial. The details will make any reasonable person's head spin.

  • Low Wages Are Poverty Wages

    How would you like to put in full-time hours at your job, work hard to perform your job well, manage your household, and yet still spend time waiting in lines for general assistance and charity to pay for your basic expenses, including food and heat? If you are a member of the growing population of minimum- and low-wage workers, this could be you. And the problem affects all of us.

  • President Obama Wants YOU to Receive Overtime Pay

    Good news coming down the pike for the millions of American workers who have been exempted from overtime pay. The New York Times reports that tomorrow, Thursday, March 13, President Obama will direct the federal Department of Labor to stop classifying a series of jobs as "professional" or "executive." How will this affect you?

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