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  • Want a Raise? Be a Man

    Men still earn more than women across the globe. Here in the U.S., the most recited figure is 77 cents for a woman, for every dollar earned by a man. In Sweden, the difference between male and female pay works out to be about 250,000 euros over the course of a lifetime. Kommunal, the country's largest union, teamed up with ad agency Volontaire to create a video to highlight the gender pay gap that still exists today, even in one of the most socially progressive countries in the world.

  • Women's Jobs Are Less Flexible Than Men's

    Why do women make less money than men? One theory has been that it's because they pursue careers that will allow them to opt out of the workforce for a few years to raise children, or else combine work and parenting by adopting a more flexible schedule. There's just one problem: a recent study found that women's jobs are less flexible, more poorly paid, and yes, more stressful than men's.

  • Work-Life Balance Still a Woman's Problem, According to Execs

    Men are still more apt to define themselves according to their role as "provider," according to a recent article in Harvard Business Review, while women are more likely to view themselves through the lens of personal achievement. As a result, both men and women in leadership positions seem to see family issues -- and balancing those issues with work -- as a woman's problem.

  • More Women on the Billionaires List Than Ever Before
    Forbes has released its annual list of the richest of the rich, and the good news is that more women made the billionaire mark than ever -- 172, out of 1,645 billionaires, worldwide.

  • If Leaning In Hurts, You May Be Doing It Wrong

    It’s been almost a year (in fact it’s just a few days short of the one-year anniversary) since Sheryl Sandberg and Lean In inspired women to consider taking control of our careers and our lives. Unfortunately, some of us are leaning in so hard, we’re missing out on life. And we're not happy because of it.

  • 3 Common Mistakes Women Make That Can Derail Their Careers

    Lois Frankel, author of Nice Girls Still Don't Get the Corner Office, says there are at least 133 mistakes women make that take their career off-track. If that seems like a lot, Vickie Elmer of Quartz points out that it's 33 percent more than Frankel listed when she first published the book 10 years ago.

  • 4 Ways Boston's New Program Could Fix the Gender Wage Gap
    While recent data has shown that the gender wage gap isn’t as wide as we thought it was, there is still a gap. In Boston, for example, women make 83 cents for each dollar a man makes and in an effort to close that gap, the city is attempting a new, different method. Here are four ways this new program could actually work.
  • 5 Ways to Beat 'Impostor Syndrome'

    Feel like a fraud, even when you know you're qualified to lead? If so, you have impostor syndrome. Fueled by an inability to internalize one's accomplishments, this psychological phenomenon appears to be fairly common among working women, and can prevent the afflicted from achieving their goals -- but it doesn't have to.

  • Now Men Are Hogging Up the Work-From-Home Jobs
    Just in case you thought everyone who worked from home was an Oprah-watching, pajama-wearing mommy -- surprise! They’re not.
  • The Do's and Don'ts of Business Attire for Women [infographic]

    In the olden days (pre-internet, and before the advent of jeans that cost about as much as dinner) people dressed up for work. Nowadays, we have a lot more freedom to choose what we wear. But for many of us, when it comes to dressing for work, too much choice is not necessarily a good thing.

  • Bye, Bye, Bad Stock Photography: Getty's Lean In Collection to Show Empowered Women at Work

    Forget women laughing alone with salad. The real stock photo crime against female empowerment is evident every time an editor searches for the phrase "working woman" and comes up with a homogeneous gallery of heteronormative women -- mostly white, middle class, and dressed for a day at Melanie Griffith's firm in Working Girl. But all that might be about to change, thanks to a collaboration between LeanIn.org and Getty Images.

  • Here Is What's Keeping Women From Getting the Raises They Deserve

    Women often don't negotiate, and their reluctance to do so costs them as much as $500,000 over the course of their lifetimes, according one study. The fear of asking for anything -- more money, better perks, time off -- prevents many women from getting what they deserve. So why are they so fearful?

  • Make Your Career Dreams a Reality; These 5 Famous Moms Did
    Working Mother magazine recently published an article that highlighted the inspiring stories of 25 celebrity mothers who chose to reinvent themselves mid-career to pursue new endeavors, which proved to be just as inspiring as they are prosperous. Read on to see how reinvention isn’t just for the rich and famous, it can also be your reality, too.
  • Your Favorite Football Team Might Be Guilty of Wage Theft
    Whether you're a fan of the Raiders or some other football team, the abuses alleged in the recent class-action lawsuit filed in Alameda County Superior Court may be more common than the football industry cares to admit. The suit alleges not only the usual wage theft violations such as no overtime pay, but a laundry list of patronizing and insulting, not to mention illegal, requirements that would cause any feminist to wonder at our lack of progress over the last century.
  • Women Are Dominating in the World of Hedge Funds (and It's Great for Everyone)
    A new study shows that fund management is proving to be gender-biased, and women are, literally, giving men a run for their money in this male-dominant industry.
  • Executive Presence Leads to Executive Careers
    You may have the necessary education and expertise to become an executive, but do you have executive presence? The way we present ourselves goes way beyond wearing a power tie or a navy blue skirt and blazer. Having or developing certain interpersonal skills and presence are necessary if you wish to become a leader.
  • 38 Percent of American Workers Don't Have Paid Sick Days

    At this time of year, we see a lot of articles admonishing workers for not staying home when they're sick. What's less talked about is the fact that only 62 percent of private sector employees have any paid sick time to use.

  • New Book Says Working Moms Can Have Their Cake and Eat It Too
    Going back to work after having a child can be a tough decision for many working mothers, because they fear motherhood means their careers have to suffer. A new book shows working that parenting and career success aren’t mutually exclusive.
  • 'Lean In' Will Soon Be a Movie

    Sony Pictures will produce a movie based on Sheryl Sandberg's book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead. Deadline broke the news, reporting that the movie will not be a biopic of Sandberg, but rather "a narrative film from the themes contained within the book," written by veteran TV writer Nell Scovell, who co-wrote the book.

  • Apple Vows to Diversify Its Board With More Women
    Apple currently only has one female board member, Andrea Jung, former CEO of Avon Products, Inc., on its eight-member, all-white and male-dominant board of directors. Recently, however, the company announced that it was taking steps to change that.