Compensation_Today_2014_hero

WHAT'S HOT?

Why Millennials make Great Interns and Future Employees Autocrat, Democrat, or Servant: What's your leadership style? The retirement savings crisis Snackable Content
IPO Get Your Ducks in a Row by Tim Low
  • What is talent worth to your business?

    Talent worth Image

    In the grand scheme of human capital management, choosing the best talent for each job type that benefits the company is the bottom line. Paying a fair salary and offering benefits above what the competition is the other side of things. Yet, very often there are disparities in what top performing employees earn versus the employees who barely squeak by (at least from the perspective of employees who have not received salary increases for a long time).

  •  
  • My employee quit without notice. What went wrong?

    Employee quit without notice image

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    The two-week notice period is as American as apple pie and the flag, but sometimes employees up and quit without so much as a by your leave.

    Considering that quitting without sufficient notice is widely viewed as unprofessional, discourteous, and unwise, why in the world would anyone do such a thing?

  •  
  • Re-examining the meaning of “team player”

    Team player imageCrystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Quick—what qualities come to mind when you hear the term “team player?”

    How about someone who is:

    • Cooperative,
    • Conscientious,
    • Helpful,
    • Flexible,
    • Hardworking, and
    • Honest?
  •  
  • Four raises a year

    Four raises a year image

    Tessara Smith,  PayScale

    One of the latest trends in employee compensation and motivation is giving employees four (small) raises a year as opposed to one large raise. Many companies have become strong proponents of this innovative payment strategy and executives are dumping the annual salary review in favor of giving out raises and bonuses a couple times per year. This begs the question, are quarterly raises a good idea for your company?

  •  
  • President Obama takes a stand for family friendly work policies

    header_happyfamily

    Tessara Smith, PayScale

    During the crash of 2009 almost all industries faced a serious decline in revenue resulting in some substantial cut backs when it came to employee’s benefits packages; at least, for the employees that companies were able to keep. Long hours, making up for the work of their laid off co-workers, and reduced vacation time became the standard for employees in still in the workplace. Fortunately, the recuperation of the market means that things are finally looking up for dedicated workers. Still, job security is the top priority for employees who have to bring home the bacon and take care of their families. But are companies taking advantage of the fact that employees are willing to work harder for less to maintain their jobs? 

  •  
  • Interpreting the stats: tips for analyzing employee turnover

    header_AnalyzeEmployeeTurnover

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    I have to admit, I am not a big sports fan. I mean sure, I enjoy the excitement and social aspect of cheering for your team, following favorite players and celebrating a victory, but the minute I hear the SportsCenter hosts spouting off numbers and comparing those numbers to other numbers, which they reference with previous numbers and anticipated numbers, I’m out. I typically love a challenge but this is one area where I am fine with not understanding what they’re talking about and not attempting to understand what all that means. However, the truth is, those who understand the stats are better connected to the game. They understand what’s typical, what’s out of the ordinary, whether or not a player’s game was good or bad and what they can usually expect from a team.

  •  
  • How to develop great employees in six easy steps

    Develop great employees imagethe majority of workers feel more motivated when their boss shows appreciation for their work

    Employee development is important, but unfortunately it is also often overlooked in the grand scheme of things. Day to day work life is hectic, but failure to actively develop employees can end up costing you top talent in the long run. Whether your company is one that hires a significant amount of young graduates, or you want to improve the team you have already built; turning good employees into great employees, is a lot less hassle then recruiting outsiders into your company. If you play your cards right, you could end up with highly skilled employees who are genuinely dedicated to helping your company thrive. Here are six strategies that you can use to start developing exceptional employees. 

  •  
  • Is workplace training a waste of time?

    header_JobTraining

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Why oh why does training have such a bad reputation?

    It’s true that some trainers aren’t very good, and it’s also true that leadership has been known to drag everyone to “respect in the workplace” training when even a blind man could see that only Benny in Sales really needed the lessons, and yes, it could be argued that training takes people away from their “real” jobs and all the work waiting to get done.

    But still.

  •  
  • Five reasons to be afraid of employee turnover

    header_NotScaredOfTurnover

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Sometimes, turnover is a downright scary word. We hear it and automatically get visions of unhappy employees exiting in droves, leaving us high and dry and always on the search for new employees. Some of us even see our jobs start to flash before our eyes as disapproving executives ask us to answer the question of why the company is experiencing turnover. While most HR professionals know that turnover isn’t the worst thing an organization can experience, there aren’t many who would argue its selling points either. However, it’s a natural part of any workforce and in some cases is actually a positive thing. Take a look below to see why turnover doesn’t have to send you running for cover.

  •  
  • When turnover is a good thing

    header_TurnoverAGoodThing

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs 

    It can be easy for those outside of human resources to see any turnover as bad news. I’ve certainly seen executives question turnover rates without understanding what’s behind the numbers. From an HR standpoint, we know that there’s bad, good and neutral turnover, and to categorize it all as a reflection of organizational management isn’t necessarily a fair assessment. Even still, we, as human resources professionals, often use an overall turnover rate as a way of measuring whether or not we are fostering a positive corporate culture, offering appropriate recognition and leadership opportunities, hiring the right people in the first place and staying competitive with our total compensation.

  •  
  • Why did my employee quit without notice?

    header_QuitWithoutNotice

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    You thought you had a good relationship with this employee. As far as you’re concerned, you were a decent boss. You treated the employee fairly, were supportive of his work, addressed him respectfully, and said “please” and “thank you.” You may even have gone out of your way to provide this employee meaningful development opportunities or a bigger salary.

  •  
  • One of your best employees just got a job offer. Should you counter?

    header_EmployeeBetterOffer

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    You’d seen the signs (such as increased absenteeism, reduced enthusiasm, decreased participation at meetings, decreased output, and so on), and you had a pretty good idea that something was amiss. But still, when one of your best employees told you she’d received another job offer, your felt a little sick to your stomach.

  •  
  • Want to know how to inspire and retain employees? Get Pay for Performance right

    header_PayForPerformance

    The hallmark of a successful organization is one in which employees happily produce top results each day and do this organically without a lot of “hand holding” from management. However, what is the secret to attaining this level of greatness?

  •  
  • How Transparent are You About Your Total Compensation?

    header_ImproveProductivity

    In the last few years, employers have begun to see the value of reporting total compensation to their workforce. For many, this is a strong retention tool that helps employees understand how much the company is vested in their success. Total compensation statements can give employees a clearer picture of how much the company has spent on health and wellness benefits, retirement savings, educational costs, and all the other perks of employment in addition to regular salaries. This effort is an important part of corporate communications that gives employees a greater insight into their contribution to the success of the company.

  •  
  • Are you prepared to lose top talent?

    header_cbpr_2014

    Laleh Hassibi, PayScale

    This week, we released the much anticipated 2014 Compensation Best Practices Report. Based on data from more than 4,700 survey respondents representing human resources practitioners, as well as business line and executive managers, the report reveals attitudes about compensation, hiring, and retention as the economy recovers from the recession. The latest annual report shows an increasing concern across businesses of all sizes about their ability to retain top performing employees, reflecting an increasingly competitive talent market. Results show that – regardless of size and industry – talent retention has become a top priority for business leaders.

  •  
  • 10 ways to boost employee incentive programs

    header_BoostPerformance

    When is the last time you took the time to thank your employees for a job well done? Several workplace studies have shown a connection between appreciation of employees and the results of company objectives. Leaders who put emphasis on demonstrating appreciation to employees on a regular basis produce a higher level of employee engagement, which boosts productivity like gangbusters. Having an employee incentive program in place is one piece of the bigger puzzle.

  •  
  • Top 5 compensation lessons from 2013

    header_YearInReview

    Mykkah Herner, M.A., CCP, PayScale

    Last year was a year of ups, downs, and shutdowns. The Affordable Care Act is still looming over us, the impact unclear. Some but not all companies are pulling free of the recession. Employees have continued moving around more and more since the official end of the recession. Yet amidst the turmoil, there are some key lessons. Essentially, in an uncertain time, compensation plans and strategies need to be flexible. In this article I’ll talk about the top 5 ways we can infuse flexibility into our programs.

  •  
  • Avoid these common performance review mistakes

    header_ReviewMistakes

     

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Is there anyone … anyone at all… who either likes writing performance reviews or receiving performance reviews?

    Yeah, I didn’t think so.

    Still, there’s no reason to compound the pain by introducing common errors into the review that render it much less effective than it would have been otherwise—that’s pain with no gain. (My apologies for the cliché.)

  •  
  • What if your co-workers knew how much you make?

    header_Buffer

    Evan Rodd, PayScale

    We’ve talked a bit about social transparency – the dawn of a new social media age in which previous ideas of privacy seem to be rapidly changing. While many of us seem more than happy to share just about every aspect of our lives online, one component still remains taboo for many – salary.

  •  
  • Why waiting for that problem employee to quit is a bad idea

    header_KeepingBadEmployeesBadIdea

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    I’d taken on a part-time job as an office assistant at my son’s daycare, intending to use the extra money as a down-payment for a home. I was thrilled to have this second job, not just for the money but also because the owner and I (let’s call her Sandy) got along really well. She was a straight shooter with a good heart (my kind of person), and we often ended the day with a chat about the goings on at the center. This was before I entered the human resources profession and way before I became a manager.

  •  



SEARCH
GET PAYSCALE NEWS
Sign up for the latest tips and tricks in compensation from PayScale.
Sign up for PayScale News


BRIGHT POSTS

Career News
SOCIALIZE WITH US
CATEGORIES