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Why Millennials make Great Interns and Future Employees Autocrat, Democrat, or Servant: What's your leadership style? The retirement savings crisis Snackable Content
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  • Employee motivation strategies that don’t work

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    Tessara Smith,  PayScale

    When you type in the words employee motivation into Google's search bar, an overabundance of articles pop up suggesting ways to coax your disengaged employees to “check back in”. You read article after article and the themes seem to get a bit redundant to say the least. If you are an experienced manager or executive, chances are you have a good grasp on what works in terms of keeping motivation in your office alive. Still there are a lot of ideas floating around out there about how to maintain employee’s desire to keep doing phenomenal work for your company. What most fail to mention in their articles however are employee motivation strategies that don’t work. 

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  • Social media recruitment 101

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    Tessara Smith, PayScale

    We live in a world plagued with technology. Everywhere you go people are staring down at their smartphones with such a fixed focus that you would think they were expecting a call telling them they had just won the lottery. Even in a professional office environment, it is borderline impossible avoid being bombarded with Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, Pinterest, etc. Lately, technology has gotten a bad rap for inhibiting the quality of personal interactions however; there is a major upside to our digitally oriented society that is being greatly underutilized. Recruiting.

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  • The retirement savings crisis

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute’s 24th annual Retirement Confidence Survey, more Americans (18 percent versus 13 percent in 2013) are feeling “very confident” they’ll have enough money in retirement.

    But the EBRI also reports that “worker savings remain low, and only a minority appear to be taking basic steps. This increased confidence is observed almost exclusively among those with higher household income … [and is] strongly correlated with household participation in a retirement plan.”

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  • The Generation Gap: Motivating Gen Xers (part 2 of 2)

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    When Generation X entered the workforce, they brought a new attitude, new expectations and new motivators than we had ever seen from their baby boomer parents. There were many factors that shaped these traits, but we can largely thank their boomer parents for what Gen X needs in an employer and what satisfies them at work.

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  • Why you need a code of ethics policy

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    In “We Should Speak Up About Ethical Violations More Often,” Joseph Grenny makes a somewhat surprising claim.

    Whistleblower laws aren’t the way to more ethical companies, he says. Instead, leadership needs to develop a culture that encourages employees to speak up—as a matter of course—about all the “minor” transgressions occurring in workplaces every day. When that happens, Grenny hypothesizes, major ethical breaches will be less likely to occur.

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  • First impressions: how to hire the right people

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    Tessara Smith,  PayScale

    They say you never get a second chance to make a first impression. If candidates blow a major interview and somehow manage to still get hired for a position then the company is either A) desperate or B) knows that they have a track record of proven success. If they are lucky enough to be able to kick down the door to great jobs based on experience alone, kudos to them. For the rest of the candidates out there, making a great first impression will determine their fate not only in regards to getting the job but also the attitude the employer will have towards them throughout their tenure at the company.

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  • President Obama takes a stand for family friendly work policies

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    Tessara Smith, PayScale

    During the crash of 2009 almost all industries faced a serious decline in revenue resulting in some substantial cut backs when it came to employee’s benefits packages; at least, for the employees that companies were able to keep. Long hours, making up for the work of their laid off co-workers, and reduced vacation time became the standard for employees in still in the workplace. Fortunately, the recuperation of the market means that things are finally looking up for dedicated workers. Still, job security is the top priority for employees who have to bring home the bacon and take care of their families. But are companies taking advantage of the fact that employees are willing to work harder for less to maintain their jobs? 

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  • 5 Tips for closing the skills gap

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    PayScale’s 2014 Best Compensation Practices Report revealed that employers are still very much concerned about the skills gap.

    According to the survey, which culled responses from 5,000 executives and HR professionals, nearly 50 percent of companies are having trouble filling positions with skilled labor.

    While not everyone agrees that a skills gap exists (or at least exists to the degree publicized in some media outlets), most do agree that something in the job market is awry when employers are complaining about not being able to find qualified workers even as job seekers complain they are qualified yet still unable to find stable, full-time employment.

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  • How modern are you?

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    Laleh Hassibi, PayScale

    Confidence in compensation practices is shaky at best at most businesses. At the same time, the nature of workforces and employment is evolving rapidly, and organizations need to work hard to keep up. Getting and keeping the best talent is becoming more competitive each day, and that same talent increasingly knows exactly what they are worth in today’s competitive market with access to online salary information.

    In order to win today’s talent wars, organizations need timely information and a modern approach to compensation management. How does your company stack up?

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  • Should pay be linked to performance?

    header_PayLinkPerformanceJessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    There are two very different schools of thought when it comes to whether or not pay should be linked to performance. We’ve seen the pay for performance option take off and reach an all-time high and in fact, 54 percent of companies reported that they were giving performance-based increases in 2013. As with anything, it has its positives and negatives, leaving the question of whether or not pay should be linked to performance still up in the air.

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  • KORU starts bridging the skills gap with Millennials

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    Tessara Smith,  PayScale

    College graduation is often celebrated by parents as a major milestone for their children. They can finally breathe a sigh of relief in anticipation of their highly capable offspring fleeing the nest; joining the workforce, and becoming financially independent individuals. As much as many University students would like to believe this too, for most the fairytale ended sometime between settling on a major and realizing they only had one year left of school. The current state of the job market for college graduates could be described as anything but promising. Instead of rejoicing in the countdown to obtaining their degrees, students are viewing their future graduation dates as their own personal doomsdays. The fact of the matter is a solid portion of the class of 2015 will end up having to move back in with their parents and work a minimum wage job. Why is this? Today’s college graduates are competent individuals with a plethora of technology skills as well as in-depth knowledge of social media. One would assume this would make them excellent candidates for entry-level positions in the job market. Apparently, employers don’t seem to agree with this, and companies have a trending tendency to shy away from hiring new employees from the millennial generation.

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  • Making your internship program work

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    There’s a reason internships are so popular—structured properly, an internship provides awesome benefits to the intern and the employer. Interns get real-world work experience, a chance to learn marketable skills, and exposure to pros in their field of interest who may be able to provide valuable introductions well beyond the internship end date.

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  • The Generation Gap: Motivating Millennials (part 1 of 2)

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    If it seems that Millennials are taking over the workforce, there’s a reason for that. These young adults are entering their careers, bright eyed and bushytailed, in huge numbers. In fact, by the year 2025, Millennials will make up 75 percent of the U.S. workforce.  Although young professionals are nothing new to businesses, what is new are the traits that this generation has, the beliefs they hold and the things that motivate them.

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  • Employee sues company over rush-hour traffic

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    A New Jersey employee is suing her former employer for allegedly violating New Jersey’s anti-discrimination law and the Family and Medical Leave Act.

    The employee, Andrea DeGerolamo, claims that her employer discriminated against her when it reneged on an agreement that would have allowed DeGerolamo to travel to and from work while avoiding rush-hour traffic, the stress of which aggravated DeGerolamo’s anxiety and depression.

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  • The Minimum Wage Victory Parade Continues

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    Tessara Smith, PayScale

    Just when you thought Seattle approving $15 was the highlight of the minimum wage battle this year, it was announced that employees who work under independent contracts are also getting a pay day. On June 12, 2014 President Obama initiated the first of many executive actions to come that will boost minimum wage for workers under new federal contracts from $7.25 per hour to $10.10 per hour. This is exciting news for contractors, who will now be properly reclassified as employees in the eyes of the government, but it is only small part of a much larger effort to increase minimum wages for all workers within the United States.

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  • Why Millennials make Great Interns and Future Employees

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    Tessara Smith, PayScale

    Millennials often get a bad rap when it comes to our work ethic in comparison with the rest of the work force; we have been called selfish, entitled, lazy, and worst of all unmotivated. The fact of the matter is most of us haven’t had to work half as hard as the generation that came before us to get to our jumping off points as college graduates. However, many of us are up to our elbows in debt from student loans and our job prospects upon graduation look grim. Perhaps you have hired underperforming workers from the millennial generation before, but don’t let a few bad apples ruin the bunch. I am here to set the record straight and tell you why hiring a Millennial will be a great choice for you as an employer.

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  • Yup. It's time to hire an HR professional

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    It’s a common scenario. As a small company begins to grow, more and more people are hired to handle the increasing workload. (Great!).  Before too long, all these new people start inquiring about benefits, so somebody decides it’s time to start getting serious about benefits (because talent expects benefits, and this company needs talent badly to help it grow intelligently), and then another somebody realizes—hey!—somebody else has to manage this stuff and by the way, more people means more conflict and who’s going to handle that?

    Eventually it becomes apparent that more structure or rules or strategy or something is needed because people keep doing stuff and asking questions and nobody has any answers. And then come the feds and all their rules and requirements, and oh boy it’s getting complicated around here.

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  • Interpreting the stats: tips for analyzing employee turnover

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    I have to admit, I am not a big sports fan. I mean sure, I enjoy the excitement and social aspect of cheering for your team, following favorite players and celebrating a victory, but the minute I hear the SportsCenter hosts spouting off numbers and comparing those numbers to other numbers, which they reference with previous numbers and anticipated numbers, I’m out. I typically love a challenge but this is one area where I am fine with not understanding what they’re talking about and not attempting to understand what all that means. However, the truth is, those who understand the stats are better connected to the game. They understand what’s typical, what’s out of the ordinary, whether or not a player’s game was good or bad and what they can usually expect from a team.

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  • 6 easy steps to being the HR pro everybody trusts

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Many, many employees don’t trust HR. That’s a fact.

    Whenever I read an article about workplace bullying, toxic bosses, unethical workplace practices, or some other related topic, and the writer recommends the worker appeal to HR for help, the comments will be full of people telling the writer he’s nuts and that going to HR is a complete waste of time.

    Well, I’m going to make a confession. I tend to agree with the commenters, because I don’t trust HR myself, and I’m an HR professional.

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  • Canada’s CEOs couldn’t get much richer, or could they?

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    Tessara Smith, PayScale

    Cats out of the bag – CEO’s make some of the largest salaries of all the employees in Canada’s workforce, and lately it seems that they are raking in an absurd amount of cash. In 2012, the top one hundred CEO’s earned an average of a little more than $7.9 million; each. To put this in perspective, that kind of money has the potential to eliminate the debt of any one of the provinces: Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, or Prince Edward Island. 

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