Compensation_Today_2014_hero

WHAT'S HOT?

Why Millennials make Great Interns and Future Employees Autocrat, Democrat, or Servant: What's your leadership style? The retirement savings crisis Snackable Content
IPO Get Your Ducks in a Row by Tim Low
  • 10 ways to boost employee incentive programs

    header_BoostPerformance

    When is the last time you took the time to thank your employees for a job well done? Several workplace studies have shown a connection between appreciation of employees and the results of company objectives. Leaders who put emphasis on demonstrating appreciation to employees on a regular basis produce a higher level of employee engagement, which boosts productivity like gangbusters. Having an employee incentive program in place is one piece of the bigger puzzle.

  •  
  • Fair and square! 5 ways to boost your bonus program

    header_holidaybonus

    How well is your company doing at fairly handling the employee bonus and incentive program? To help you figure out that answer, first ask yourself this question: Do you have a way of tracking the perks you hand out to employees so that you know you are doing this well? If your company chooses to use bonuses as part of a compensation program, but you are not effectively managing this with data, you could be missing the mark.  

  •  
  • 3 steps to handling a request for a raise

    header_DealWithGivingRaises

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Pay raises are an inevitable aspect of managing employees but that doesn’t make handling them any less complicated. Whether it’s determining which employees to give raises to or considering how much of a raise is ideal, the process typically makes the top of the list of dreaded tasks for HR professionals and managers. To make matters even more difficult, employees don’t always wait until their performance review to request a raise. Even though it may not be the best time for you, when employees request a raise you are faced with decisions that you may not have considered before that moment.

  •  
  • Earned time off incentives - are they effective?

    header_TimeOffIncentive

    One of the many ways that employers incentivize the workplace is by offering earned time off for hours worked. This can be an effective way to motivate and reward employees at the same time as creating access to greater work life balance. For most, it’s a win-win situation. Employers have access to a reliable workforce, while employees have the chance to earn much needed time off. It seems like a good compromise to the growing issue of faltering attendance and performance in many organizations.

  •  
  • Employee stack ranking - motivation or manipulation?

    header_Pay

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    One of the most important responsibilities of an HR manager is to find the right way to motivate employees. On the surface this can seem like a simple task, one that can be checked off your list with a few compliments, maybe a bonus or even a promotion. But when you get in the trenches with these employees you wish to motivate, you’ll see that the day-to-day motivators for employees vary greatly from person to person, making it tricky to determine what type of system will best fit the employees who are a part of it and the organization as a whole.

  •  
  • Top 5 compensation lessons from 2013

    header_YearInReview

    Mykkah Herner, M.A., CCP, PayScale

    Last year was a year of ups, downs, and shutdowns. The Affordable Care Act is still looming over us, the impact unclear. Some but not all companies are pulling free of the recession. Employees have continued moving around more and more since the official end of the recession. Yet amidst the turmoil, there are some key lessons. Essentially, in an uncertain time, compensation plans and strategies need to be flexible. In this article I’ll talk about the top 5 ways we can infuse flexibility into our programs.

  •  
  • 3 Performance review options for startups

    header_StartupPerformanceReviews

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Managing a startup company is a tough job whether you are just breaking ground or growing quickly. There’s so much on-the-job training and such a learning curve, not to mention that you never know what each day will bring. Wearing many hats, you have to quickly become an expert and grow professionally in order to keep up. Many startups have the advantage of having leaders who have years of professional experience so not every problem that comes up is foreign but at the same time, you also have the freedom to leave everything you know behind and establish new solutions and traditions. That’s a major reason why the topic of performance reviews in startups elicits such a varied response.

  •  
  • The performance review: why consistency matters

    header_ReviewConsistancy

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Conducting performance reviews is a tricky part of any manager’s job. They tend to hold quite a bit of weight when it comes to judging an employee’s contribution to the organization but are also very subjective, sometimes leaving employees with unfair assessments or unclear expectations. To make things worse, managers tend to let their own biases affect performance reviews so employees may not trust the performance review at all. While these issues are all unfortunate aspects of performance reviews, they happen every day in both large and small businesses.

  •  
  • Do’s and don’ts for managing the insubordinate employee

    header_dosDontsManagement

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Insubordinate employees are a poison in the workplace.

    That was bold, and I’m sorry, but it’s true.

    Employees with putrid attitudes who won’t and don’t follow instructions are a real drag on workplace productivity, because even if they’re kind of, sort of doing their jobs, the effort required to manage them relative to their output is a sorry bargain.

  •  
  • Is your paternalistic culture killing your business?

    header_Paternalistic

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    A company’s culture, or personality, is a very big deal. Just as an individual’s personality can be a help or a hindrance to meeting certain personal goals, a company’s “personality” can be a help or a hindrance to meeting certain organizational goals.

  •  
  • Making the performance review relevant to employees

    header_review

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Performance reviews are typically a source of dread and stress for employees. They tend to be very critical, one sided and vague, leaving very little of value for employees to take away from the evaluation. However, they are a necessary part of growth and development, both for your company and the employee as an individual. Performance reviews establish expectations, review job performance and provide direction, all of which contribute to the success of your company. However, there is another side to performance reviews that often gets overlooked: what the performance review does for the employee.

  •  
  • Holiday parties vs. employee bonuses - what do employees most look forward to?

    header_HolidayParty

    Get out your party hats – it’s the annual holiday season! This time of year signals a time when employees eagerly look forward to what the company has in store for them. Like little kids in a candy shop, they wonder if they will they get another turkey from the boss again this year, or does he have something else up his sleeve – like a bonus check?

  •  
  • 7 tips for hiring and retention of top performing employees

    header_HireRetentionGoodEmployee

    It’s a fact. Each year businesses face too late what happens when employee morale drops and the best begin to leave for greener pastures. This most often occurs when the leadership team forgets that there is a fine line between recruiting and retaining high performance candidates. It’s a sad state of affairs that is completely preventable, with the right efforts and planning.

  •  
  • Are your employees underemployed?

    header_underemployed

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Despite the recession being officially over, the media are still reporting about the great number of underemployed Americans—Americans who either don’t have enough paid work or whose jobs require significantly less qualification than they possess. CNBC recently reported that 17.2% of the workforce is underemployed.

    Generally we think of the underemployed as those in fairly menial positions doing repetitive, low-skilled work for low pay, and that’s one face of underemployment, for sure.

    However, even a highly skilled, well-paid employee can be underemployed if his abilities and knowledge aren’t consistently put to good use.

  •  
  • Planning your 2014 raises - tips for improving your pay for performance strategy

    header_PlanForRaises

    For Human Resource departments, the end of the year signals the time for performance reviews and salary planning for the New Year. This can be a challenging time, when the HR team and payroll managers must coordinate their efforts to produce a compensation strategy that helps make the company profitable in the coming quarter.

  •  
  • Do pay for performance plans boost employee productivity?

    header_PayForPerformance

    The nature of pay for performance has come under fire many times, yet this compensation strategy is based on sound business principles that have been around for ages. Traditional theories of positive reinforcement have been shown to have a direct link to performance in the workplace. It is common sense -- when employees are provided with a reward system that is tied to their job performance, this tends to motivate and inspire them. In a nutshell, when employees clearly understand what they stand to gain financially from good performance, they have a more focused effort on meeting these performance goals in order to be compensated.

  •  
  • Pay for performance fail? Microsoft finally dumps forced stack rank

    snackable_header_PfPFailhttp://www.bonkersworld.net/images/2011.06.27_organizational_charts.png

    Tim Low, PayScale

    Much has been written, and much more will be, about Microsoft’s decision this week to eliminate their previous performance review process. Up until now, Microsoft relied on a forced stack rank where managers were required to grade employees on a bell curve, and thus also requiring ranking some employees at the low end of the curve.

  •  
  • 6 tips for doing a performance improvement plan right

    header_PerformanceImprovement

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    There’s a common perception that once an employee is placed on a performance improvement plan (PIP), it’s the beginning of the end for that individual. And that’s largely true.

  •  
  • Four keys for preparing for an annual performance review

    header_4stepsPrepPerfReviews

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    There are a lot of things in life that you can successfully do last minute. For instance, holiday shopping can be put off until December 23 and you’ll probably still get the Lego kit that was at the top of your kids’ wish list; laundry can be saved until midnight on Sunday and it will still be just as clean as if it was done Saturday morning; sales reports can be pulled the very hour they’re due and it makes no difference. However, annual performance reviews are not one of those things.

  •  
  • Top 10 mistakes when giving a performance review

    header_PerformanceReviewMistakes

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    There are two schools of thought when it comes to performance reviews. People tend to either view them as an opportunity for feedback and growth or spend all year dreading the awkward discussion chocked full of criticism. How you, and even your employees, view performance reviews is really up to you. Rather than seeing these reviews as an annoyance or as confrontational, think of them as a checkpoint to measure how far an employee has come and where their path is heading.

  •  



SEARCH
GET PAYSCALE NEWS
Sign up for the latest tips and tricks in compensation from PayScale.
Sign up for PayScale News


BRIGHT POSTS

Career News
SOCIALIZE WITH US
CATEGORIES