• Why it Pays to Pay More

    Pay to Pay MoreJessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    PayScale’s compensation data indicates that an overwhelming majority of employees gave pay raises last year. For millions of workers, this is good news. However, raising wages across the board is a daunting scenario for most businesses.

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  • Get Onboarding Right for Better Employee Retention

    Employee Onboarding

    The competition for top talent continues to heat up as organizations fight for those who have highly sought after skills. In some industries where growth is the strongest, the search for candidates with the right stuff can take months. Yet, why is it that as quickly as companies secure their best employees, they jump ship?

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  • Retention, retention, retention: Employers focus on keeping staff in 2015

    Tessara Smith, PayScale

    For the third year in a row, PayScale’s 2015 Compensation Best Practices Report (CBPR), discovered that employee retention was a top concern among the majority of employers.

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  • Yes, people really do quit jobs for more money

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    PayScale’s 2015 Compensation Best Practices Report (CBPR) noted two primary reasons people quit their jobs last year: personal reasons (family, marriage, health, school, etc.) and “seeking higher pay elsewhere.”

    A new baby, health challenges, a desire for more education, or a partner’s great new job across the country are all common catalysts for making a job change, it’s true. And generally speaking, that decision is completely unrelated to the employee’s work conditions (and therefore outside of the employer’s control).

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  • Why retaining employees is now even more important than retaining customers

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    How do you retain customers? Common answers may include creating kickass products, having a strong brand, or having great data to help you beat the competition.

    But there’s another key to retaining customers and that’s by retaining your employees. Your employees are the framework on which all of your company’s success is built, which is why a company with low turnover is far more likely to be successful than one with high turnover.

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  • 21 fresh employee engagement ideas

    When a workplace is filled with happy and engaged employees, the culture takes on a life of its own. It’s nearly impossible to not get caught up in the enthusiasm of these organizations. People are smiling, meetings promote real innovation, and everyone is focused on producing the best work while having fun.

    A culture this good doesn’t happen by accident. How do we get there?

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  • The low down on employee turnover

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    According to PayScale’s 2015 Compensation Best Practices Reportthe top five reasons for turnover in 2014 were:
    1. Employees seeking higher compensation (20.8 percent)
    2. Personal reasons (20.6 percent)
    3. Employees seeking advancement elsewhere (17 percent)
    4. Termination due to poor performance (16 percent)
    5. Employees seeking different company culture/expectations (9 percent)

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  • Understanding and communicating the value of total rewards

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    The first step toward understanding and communicating the value of total rewards is defining the term “total rewards.” Think of total rewards as all the tools available to the employer to attract, motivate, and retain employees. Total rewards include everything the employee perceives to be of value from the employment relation-ship. Smart employers use this “whole package” concept to attract and obtain new talent.

    In the current job market, workers have come to expect more from their potential employers than competitive wages. When considering a position, most employees will ponder the total rewards affiliated with the offer. Total rewards can comprise wages, time off, a flexible schedule, group benefits, work environment, work culture, and many other things. The considerations will differ by employee, because different employees want and value different things.
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  • It’s not a skills gap, it’s a skills challenge

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    The height of the Great Recession brought talk of the skills gap front and center. As millions of job seekers took to the Internet to complain about boorish recruiters, clueless hiring managers, and broken hiring processes (including endless rounds of interviews), employers claimed they couldn’t find enough qualified workers to fill their job openings.

    Workers shot back that there were plenty of qualified candidates—employers were simply taking advantage of the slow economy to be overly demanding, ridiculously exclusive (no long-term unemployed or older workers need apply), and cheap. The term “purple squirrel” became a conversation staple.

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  • Show them the money: Economy surges, but employee wages slow

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    By most reports, the U.S. Economy is in better shape than it’s been in a long while. Although employers only added 126,000 jobs in March (far below the 295,000 added in February), we’ve seen an average of 269,000 jobs per month over the past year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).
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  • How bad is a bad reputation?

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    When researchers at Corporate Responsibility Magazine asked 1,014 people in North America about the impact of a company’s reputation on their willingness to accept a job offer, they learned that reputation costs.

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  • Developing employee skills with generous training incentives

    It’s long been understood that companies need great talent to attain higher levels of innovation and success.

    The only problem is, shortages in certain skill sets are making it difficult for organizations to hire the best. When this is the case, smart companies turn to training and development to bring their current and future employees up to speed.

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  • Why total compensation matters (and 3 ways to give your program a boost)

    There’s a growing focus on compensation transparency as human resource teams struggle to find and keep great talent. By highlighting all the perks an organization offers, companies hope to attract the best people to take the company to the next level. But does compensation transparency really draw better quality workers? 

    I’d argue that before focusing on transparency, employers should be sure they have the best compensation program possible, because compensation matters now more than ever.

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  • Job enrichment done right

    Tessara Smith, PayScale

    The time has come to consider doing some spring cleaning in the office, and I’m not talking about mopping and dusting.

    Employees get bored doing the same job for months, years, and sometimes decades on end. Obvious solutions to this boredom are promotions and pay raises, but in some instances, these are not an ideal course of action. A vastly underused option in this scenario is job enrichment programs. Job enrichment programs aim to reduce repetition and allow workers to expand their roles.

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  • Using nontraditional incentives to motivate your employees

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Without question, cash is the most common (and many would argue the most important) form of compensation. Each year, most employees look forward to increasing their income. The general thought is that after 12 months of good work, an employee is entitled to a raise. This raise is expected to reflect the value the company places on the individual receiving it—or something like that.
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  • Golden carrots don’t produce employee engagement

    Earning more business is a natural part of growth for most for-profit organizations. It’s very easy to get caught up in focusing on the bottom line, forgetting that much of this revenue comes from the efforts of an engaged workforce. Without an engaged workforce, no business will prosper.

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  • The right way to pay remote employees


    Have you employed any remote workers yet? If not, there’s a good chance you have or will in the near future. The use of remote employees and contractors has many benefits, including the ability to expand globally with minimal overhead costs, the ability to recruit from a much wider skillset of talent, and the convenience of having employees in multiple time zones to manage projects around the clock. Multiple studies, including these highlighted in Working Mother Magazine have also shown that remote workers are more productive, which means companies earn greater revenues.

    How can your organization ensure your remote workers are paid the best possible compensation for their unique work value?

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  • How to say “no” when your employee asks for more pay

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    In a perfect world, every time you wanted to reward a high-performing employee with more cash, you’d have the wherewithal to do it and no other factors to consider.

    In some instances, an employee may ask and then receive. However, this isn’t always easy to do, and in some cases it’s not feasible at all.

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  • Your employees are probably looking for a better deal...will they find it?

    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Today we’re releasing the much anticipated 2015 Compensation Best Practices Report.

    Based on data from more than 5,500 business leaders, the report reveals attitudes about compensation, hiring, and retention as the economy continues to recover from the recession. This latest research report shows that while most companies plan to grow in size and offer salary raises in 2015, employers are still very concerned about attracting and retaining top performing employees, which creates serious doubts about their ability to compete effectively in our rebounding economy.

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  • The top 10 recruiting mistakes employers must avoid

    Let's face it. Recruiting today takes guts. The job market can be brutal, especially in industries that are desperate for great candidates. The life of a recruiter, and nearly every other person who’s in charge of hiring, can be stressful and difficult. Sometimes mistakes are made, leading to poor hires who do more harm than good to an organization while costing precious time and money.

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