• 3 ways to use workforce analytics to forecast your next hire

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs 

    Forecasting your organization’s hiring needs is one of the most difficult things to do. To really have a good idea of your hiring forecast, you’d have to have an incredible sense of your workforce’s attitudes, expectations, workloads and even personal lives. In fact, it would require almost daily follow up to keep a constant read on the situation. This is just one of the reasons that it’s difficult to anticipate which business areas will have positions to fill and when. However, there is a way to proactively gauge hiring needs without all but asking employees when they plan to quit. The answer lies within your workforce analytics.

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  • Big ego, small ego: Google’s Laszlo Bock talks humility in the workplace

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Just about anyone who writes about the workplace can agree that American companies are facing a serious leadership void.

    In a recent survey, nearly 70 percent of employees reported not liking their jobs.

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  • PTO policy - what are your obligations as an employer?

    PTO policies

    Nearly every workplace has a paid time off (PTO) or earned time off policy to compensate employees who must take time off for personal reasons. This can sometimes be a complex benefit to manage, leaving human resource professionals wondering if they should even offer it in the first place. After all, what does a company have to gain by paying employees for time not worked?

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  • Why ask why? The importance of asking questions

    Ask more quetionsCrystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Did you know that the great inventor Thomas Edison was yanked out of school by his mom after a teacher complained that Edison asked too many questions? Silly teacher! How can someone ask too many questions?

    Curiosity makes the world go ‘round. Problems can’t be resolved without asking questions, and even if something fantastic is discovered by accident (like penicillin) the process would have never started without someone asking a question.

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  • Dealing with the emotional employee

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    What would you do if you criticized an employee’s performance, and she cried? What about if she got angry and raised her voice or became sarcastic and hostile?

    How would you handle a complaint about a manager who screams or throws things?

    (Yes, it happens. I once knew a manager who’d get disgusted about work—and granted, he had a crappy job and a crappy employer—and then throw large stacks of book galleys on the floor with a loud thud to show it.)

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  • Young love is wonderful. Young management? Not so much.

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    A few weeks ago, I interviewed for a writing assignment with a young and growing company, and for a while there things looked promising.

    But by the end of the conversation, I knew I wasn’t going to be pursuing this work.

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  • When your employees don't respect you

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    Oh, for a return to the good old days, when employees knew their place and didn’t expect to be heard. Not like today, when a worker with an opinion may have the nerve to share it. Why, he might even have the audacity to tell you that your management skills could stand some improvement! Outrageous. 

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  • Botox or die: ageism in the workplace

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    Apparently, it’s the survival of the youngest in Silicon Valley. According to a recent New Republic article, by writer Noam Scheiber, that details the desperate measures that professionals in their early 40s are doing to stay employable, these efforts that include getting regular Botox injections and hitting the gym for hours a day to stay youthful are on the rise. No longer are seasoned employees looked at as valuable to the success of the technology firms they work for. Instead, a growing disdain for anyone born before the 1980s has reared its ugly head.

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  • How to stop nitpicking and lead your team to better performance

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR

    NIT-PICK (v.) to be excessively concerned with or critical of inconsequential details (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/nitpick)

    The problem with the nitpicking manager is that he often lacks self-insight. In other words, the nitpicking manager doesn’t view his behavior as unhelpful. And that makes perfect sense, because if this manager viewed his behavior as unhelpful, one can only imagine that he wouldn’t be acting this way, right?

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  • 5 truths about pay your employees don’t want you to know

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    Crystal Spraggins, SPHR 

    Quick—what’s the one topic many job seekers are advised to avoid during the interview process?

    You guessed it. Money. When job seekers are focused on money during the interview stage, it shows a lack of real interest and commitment to the work—or so the thinking goes.

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  • Is it time to ban bossy?

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    Evan Rodd, PayScale

    Are women called Bossy more often than men? If so, what impact does that have on the overall picture of gender equality in leadership positions? The gender wage gap and women’s roles in leadership are popular, and sadly sometimes polarizing topics of conversation. Recently there has been a lot of buzz regarding Sheryl Sandberg’s Ban Bossy campaign, which is “a public service campaign to encourage leadership and achievement in girls.”

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  • 7 steps to managing pay for your remote workforce

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    Managing all the unique responsibilities of a remote workforce is challenging enough. Staying on top of compensation is an entirely different matter. With some 30-45 percent of the adult global workforce working from home at least part of the time, employers must be able to find ways to handle the demands of compensation administration in a modern world. (Source: Forbes) Companies are increasingly turning to outsourced labor pools too, using above average compensation strategies and attractive benefit programs to reel in the best talent.

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  • Seven signs your compensation strategy needs a do-over

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    Perhaps no area of human resources is as uncomfortable to talk about as the annual compensation update with the executive team. It seems as if every HR manager is tasked with proving that an improved compensation offering is good for business.

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  • The ROI of HR Technology

    header_ROI_HR_Tech

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Investing in HR technology is something that is typically done with great consideration. After all, it’s expensive, creates downtime and requires system training. Additionally, investments can be a hard sell for those outside of your department as others may not see why the technology is necessary or beneficial. While frustrating, it’s understandable when others don’t understand why HR technology is a vital part of how you do your jobs. If you’re considering new technology or pitching the idea, it can be difficult to put a number to the difference it will make, or validate your purchase by showing its return on investment. There’s no exchange of funds in your department, no sales numbers and no revenue or losses (in the traditional sense), so how do you calculate the ROI it will provide?

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  • How Transparent are You About Your Total Compensation?

    header_ImproveProductivity

    In the last few years, employers have begun to see the value of reporting total compensation to their workforce. For many, this is a strong retention tool that helps employees understand how much the company is vested in their success. Total compensation statements can give employees a clearer picture of how much the company has spent on health and wellness benefits, retirement savings, educational costs, and all the other perks of employment in addition to regular salaries. This effort is an important part of corporate communications that gives employees a greater insight into their contribution to the success of the company.

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  • Timing your HR Technologies: when is it appropriate to invest?

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Technology is one of the most expensive aspects of business, yet is constantly changing. Because of its expensive nature, it can be difficult to keep up with not just the technology you’d like but in fact what could make a significant difference in your department, it’s hard to know when and how to invest. Invest too soon or in the wrong technology and you’ll waste a significant amount of money, but rest on past-its-prime technology and you could lose productivity and eventually, money.

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  • Top workplace wellness trends for 2014

    header_EmployeeWellness

    Crystal Spraggins

    2o13 was an interesting year for workplace wellness.

    Amid a ton of bad press, CVS Caremark initiated a new policy mandating that employees take tests for blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol, and body mass and body weight or pay a monthly fine of $50.00. The policy also stated, "Going forward, you'll be expected not just to know your numbers—but also to take action to manage them.

    Bloggers, lawyers, and media personalities chastised CVS for using the stick when the carrot would have done just as well, but CVS disagreed, arguing that they’d been offering the carrot for a while with few takers.

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  • What to do when your employee posts nasty things about you on Facebook

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    Crystal Spraggins

    It’s a pretty common scenario nowadays. An employee with a complaint about your company gets on social media and tells the whole world how much she thinks you suck. Ouch.

    You’re not at all pleased with this display of dirty laundry and disloyalty, and your feelings are a little hurt, too. What an ingrate! Perhaps this employee should work elsewhere—you’d be only too happy to show her the door.

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  • Is a transparent wage policy right for you?

    header_wage_transparency

    Crystal Spraggins

    A very common line in policy manuals is one urging employees not to share wage information with coworkers. Although such a policy could run afoul of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), which guarantees employees the right to congregate with other employees for their common good, many employers apparently believe the policy’s inclusion in their manual is worth the risk. After all, if everyone knew what everyone else was making, all kinds of problems would follow. People would be jealous, and management would be inundated with complaints and requests for pay increases. There could even be lawsuits.

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  • Are you prepared to lose top talent?

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    Laleh Hassibi, PayScale

    This week, we released the much anticipated 2014 Compensation Best Practices Report. Based on data from more than 4,700 survey respondents representing human resources practitioners, as well as business line and executive managers, the report reveals attitudes about compensation, hiring, and retention as the economy recovers from the recession. The latest annual report shows an increasing concern across businesses of all sizes about their ability to retain top performing employees, reflecting an increasingly competitive talent market. Results show that – regardless of size and industry – talent retention has become a top priority for business leaders.

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