• Budgeting Employee Compensation Like You Would Your Personal Budget

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Most people tend to view their personal and corporate budgets in very different ways, even though the basic principles of both are the same. To create a budget, no matter what type of budget it is, you have certain amount of money you need to work within and specific expenses that need to be included. So if the principles of both are so basic and similar, it would only stand to reason that the same budgeting wisdom you use at home could also be adapted to the budget you create at work also.

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  • The skills gap starts in high school

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    There’s no denying that the skills gap is a growing concern for employers, but there may be some dispute as to when it begins. Common misconceptions could be that the skills gap occurs during the college years, as students aren’t equipped with the necessary experience to enter the workforce qualified to do a job. Some may also think it begins as workers gain more years of experience but fail to maintain their knowledge of current technologies, processes or industry knowledge. However, the skills gap actually begins in high school, far before a worker even declares a major or takes on their first full time job.

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  • 4 tips for negotiating compensation in the workplace

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    There are some things in life that people avoid like the plague. Talking about money at work is one of them. Working in human resources, it’s part of our jobs everyday but it can still be awkward and uncomfortable. Money is a sensitive topic for many people and it can bring up emotions that aren’t typically expressed elsewhere at work. Additionally, you’ve likely been asked questions that are difficult to answer or that you just don’t know how to handle. However, even with the difficult nuances of compensation negotiation, it doesn’t have to turn into a situation you tell stories about for years to come. Take a look at these five tips for discussing compensation in the workplace:

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  • Using online education to close the skills gap

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Nearly every company in every industry has been challenged by a skills gap in their workplace. Whether it’s a significant gap, such as the inability to fill demanding positions, or more minor, such as the need for an employee to become more skilled in creating spreadsheets, the skills gap can be felt nearly anywhere there are employees. Companies use a wide variety of resources to close the skills gap, from external recruiting, to internal training and mentorship programs, but there’s another resource that isn’t often used but is highly valuable: online education.

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  • To tweet, or not to tweet: 3 things to know when developing a social media policy

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    Evan Rodd, PayScale

    Social media is the ultimate 21st century water cooler, allowing just about anyone to say, well, just about anything to various audiences. Unfortunately, this freedom can sometimes paint a less-than-professional picture of your company, especially when employees use social media as a means to air grievances surrounding their jobs.

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  • 3 barriers to successful pay-for-performance implementation

    Pay for performanceLaleh Hassibi, PayScale

    Today most organizations are either moving toward a pay-for-performance compensation strategy, or at least discussing it. Correlating pay with performance has proven to improve employee retention in many companies, but even so, some detractors of performance-related pay models will tell you that more have been attempted and failed than succeeded. 

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  • What makes employees happy?

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    Laleh Hassibi, PayScale

    Most business leaders spent a lot of time worrying about whether or not their employees are going to stick around, dreading the expense of turnover. One big decision factor in an employee's mind is simply whether or not they are happy in their job. 

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  • 3 lessons on retention from the NFL, NBA, and MLB

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    We tend to throw around the word “team” a lot in the workplace. “She’s a valuable part of the team,” “Be a team player,” and “This is going to take a team effort.” are all phrases that we toss around like second nature. But for as much as managers view their employees as teams, they may not be doing a superb job coaching. We, as HR professionals, may not be the best team managers in the league, either.

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  • EMA Senior Care is getting smarter about comp with PayScale

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    Laleh Hassibi, PayScale

    EMA Senior Care a long-term care organization with approximately 850 employees. EMA is located exclusively in Maryland, with six locations across the state. PayScale interviewed Jim Donovan, Director of Total Rewards, to discover how PayScale Insight is helping them drive their business objectives.

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  • The Death of DOMA: What Does It Mean For HR?

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    Evan Rodd, PayScale

    2013 is shaping up to be a big year for healthcare benefits in the US, and Human Resources professionals are starting to ask: What do these changes mean for my company’s benefits program?

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  • Financial Pacific Leasing saves time and money with PayScale Insight

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    Laleh Hassibi, PayScale

    Financial Pacific Leasing is an equipment leasing company located just outside of Seattle in Federal Way, Washington. The company employs approximately 120 people. PayScale talked with Heather Bolek, Vice President of Human Resources, to learn more about how PayScale Insight helps their business.

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  • Creating Pay Transparency in the Workplace

    Compensation transparencyJessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    When you hear the phrase “transparency in the workplace” what comes to mind? Does the infamous Open Door Policy come to mind? Or do you cringe at the idea of being more transparent? Transparency is one of those buzz words that are thrown around quite a bit in corporate America, but how many actually practice it? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the median number of years that wage and salary workers stay with an employer is 4.6. This number is up from a January 2010 statistics at 4.4 years. Being transparent in can make employees feel more satisfied and want to stay with you longer. 

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  • How to reduce turnover by building relationships

    Reduce Turnover

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Employee retention is on the forefront of most HR managers’ minds. Though turnover remains relatively consistent throughout the years, the uptick in the economy has brought with it an increase in employee turnover as there are more options for employment. In fact, a recent study of more than 4,000 companies found that 59 percent of employers list retention as their top concern in 2013.

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  • What Makes a Great Hiring Manager (part two of three)

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    In part one of this thee part series, "What Makes a Great Hiring Manager,"  I talked about all the different hats that a hiring manager needs to wear. Interviewer, recruiter, networker, relationship builder – the list goes on and on. What I didn’t mention in part one of What Makes a Good Hiring Manager is that the difficult part about wearing all these hats is that to be truly successfully, you need to wear them all exceptionally well.

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  • How to Budget Compensation in a Volatile Economy

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    Laleh Hassibi, PayScale

    At the end of 2012, most businesses were very optimistic about job and economic growth in 2013. The trends from Q4 and early Q1 supported the fact that we were in fact rebounding quite nicely from the recent economic recession. There was a small worry that the impending doom of sequestration would occur, but most business leaders skipped optimistically into 2013 with confidence that Congress would come to an agreement, thereby avoiding indiscriminate, across-the-board spending cuts.

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  • 3 Considerations for Compensating Interns

    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    While each of us has probably interned for free at one point in our lives, we also all know how much it sucks. As an intern, you’re not only the low man on the totem pole, you’re probably also working your butt off trying to impress your boss and not getting paid to do it. So what gives with the unpaid internship gig?

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  • Outsourced HR—Is it Right For You?

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    There comes a point for every growing company when you must begin evaluating how to make the best use of your time and resources. You might first look to the revenue generating areas of your business to see how you can streamline processes or outsource certain duties, but don’t forget that as your company grows, your HR department will require quite a bit of attention as well.

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  • 5 Essential Employer Deadlines for Obamacare

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    You may have heard about this little thing called Obamacare that’s headed our way. It’s made up of about 1200 pages of law, will affect millions of people and is estimated to raise costs for employees by as much as 73 percent. So really, this is clearly minor, unless you are an employer, an employee or oh, an American.

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  • The DOs and DONT's of Cutting Compensation Costs

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    Jessica Miller-Merrell, blogging4jobs

    Our economy has come a long way in the last couple of years. Things are definitely looking up, but some companies are still feeling the pain. If you're experiencing the pressure to cut costs, you're not alone. The recent sequestering on the federal budget is the perfect example of making difficult decisions to make ends meet. When those tough decisions need to be made, chances are, you're the one your company turns to.

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  • Pricing to the Employee vs. Pricing to the Job

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    Mykkah Herner, MA, CCP, PayScale

    As an employee, I’m often concerned with my own value and therefore worth to the organization. As a manager, I was often trying to determine the value of each job to the organization. Now as a comp professional, I focus on a little bit of both: the value of the job itself, but also the value of the employee to the organization.

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