• 3 Times It's OK to Lie at Work
    Even if you just started your first job yesterday, you probably know that it's generally a bad idea to lie on your resume, or about your salary history, or about your skills and abilities. Why? Very simply, it's because most liars get caught – maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but eventually, and publicly, and usually with a lot of embarrassing fallout. As Mark Twain once said, "If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything." Still, anyone who's ever spent time with someone who is 100 percent bluntly honest knows that a little truth-bending is sometimes an important part of professional life. Today, on National Honesty Day and in the spirit of irony, we offer you just a few times when it's OK to be less than truthful at work.
  • 3 Things Working Women Should Do to Feel More Empowered
    Despite the fact that women make up nearly half of the workforce, they still are severely underrepresented in leadership roles. In fact, women make up "only 14.6 percent of executive officers, 8.1 percent of top earners, and 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs," reports Forbes, which means working women have slim pickings when it comes to female role models in their careers. However, that doesn't mean that women can't feel empowered in their careers – it just means they have to learn to be the role models, themselves. Here's how working women can become the change they want to see in the corporate world.
  • Harriet Tubman's Image Appearing on the $20 Bill Is a Really Big Deal
    If you didn't know anything about the history of our country, you might think it was pretty strange to see that so many of us are actually quite moved by the decision to make Harriet Tubman the new face of the $20. After a lengthy process, and a passionate campaign, Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew announced that an image of Tubman will appear on the front of the $20 bill, with Jackson represented on the back. Here's why this is about more than just money, and what you should know.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! My Co-Worker Stole All the Good Vacation Days
    If you're interested in work-life balance issues, you've probably read your fair share of articles exhorting you to live in the moment and be here now and so on. There's just one problem: professional life demands that we live in the moment, and also live in next week, and also in six months from now. Take, for example, the problem of planning vacation time. To get it approved and not irritate your co-workers, you have to submit your request for summer fun while snow's still on the ground. Of course, even if you do that, there's no guarantee that you'll get what you asked for. For instance, your evil co-worker might get in ahead of you and scoop up all the good days. In this week's roundup, we look at advice for coping with that situation, plus job search tools you're probably overlooking, and how to grow your professional network without ignoring your personal life.
  • Here's How Switching Jobs Can Really Cost You
    Are things starting to feel stale at the office? If you're feeling unfulfilled in your work and daydreaming about different companies, you're not alone. According to Gallup, 51 percent of currently employed Americans are considering a new job. But before you send in your two weeks' — or even call a recruiter — you should weigh the downsides of leaving that desk. They may surprise you.
  • Abs vs. Outcomes: UW's Cheerleading Infographic Shows That Colleges Aren't Marketing Themselves Correctly
    The recent controversy caused by a tip sheet for prospective cheerleaders at the University of Washington doesn't just show bad taste, it's more evidence that colleges aren't focusing on what really matters in appealing to students: whether or not they'll get a job after graduation.
  • Why You Get Stuck in Conflicts at Work, According to a Harvard Negotiation Expert

    Why do even rational people get embroiled in conflicts they can't solve? The root cause, says Daniel Shapiro, founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program, is an adversarial mindset called the Tribes Effect, in which conflicts turn into "me versus you, us versus them."

    "People think, 'Let's just be rational and we can resolve our differences, we can resolve our conflict,'" Shapiro says. "Not true. Unless you deal with the core psychology to the conflict, the mindset that's driving you and the other side in the conflict, unless you deal with that, the conflict will persist."

  • The Truth About Our After-Work Email Habits
    Sometimes, the very innovations that we hope will simplify our lives actually end up complicating them. Technology makes our world smaller by speeding up the rate of our communication, but that doesn't necessarily make our work-lives easier or less stressful. Email is exactly this kind of double-edged sword. It comes with both benefits and drawbacks. But, through building better awareness of how email habits impact our lives, we can maximize the positive effects.
  • 5 Slack Add-Ons to Entertain You at Work
    If you use Slack at your office, you're already familiar with joy that comes from sending your co-workers gif after gif (or jif after jif). What you might not know is that there is an incredible goldmine of add-ons in Slack that you can use that will make your workday significantly better. From CatFacts to Kanye West, there's an add-on for that. Check them out here.
  • How to Tweet for the Queen (or Any Other Celebrity)
    Nearly three in five millennials have a Twitter account. While the company may have reported less-than-stellar numbers in the last quarter, it's certainly a brand that Americans in 2016 are quite familiar with. And even if you aren't among of the scores of active users, some interesting new job opportunities may convince you to get familiar with the social media platform, namely: you could be tweeting for the Queen of England.
  • Chobani Yogurt's CEO Shares Stock With Employees, Grows Fantastic Culture
    Wouldn't it be nice if your boss handed you a million-dollar bonus in the form of company stock? On Tuesday, Chobani Yogurt Founder and CEO Hamdi Ulukaya may have done just that.
  • Jobs That Are Safe From the Robots for Now
    It's something we've been told for years: eventually, the robots will come for all of our jobs. While technological innovation takes time, a recent report by Merrill Lynch predicts that in the next 20 years, 47 percent of jobs in the U.S. are at risk for replacement. This is understandably concerning, but it's important to note that not all careers and industries will be equally affected. Here are a few of the occupations that are much less likely to be overtaken by the machines.
  • #WednesdayWisdom: 7 Tim Ferriss Quotes to Inspire True Productivity
    Even people who've never picked up a self-help book in their lives are at least familiar with Tim Ferriss, the productivity guru whose book, The 4-Hour Workweek, sold well over a million copies and spent four years on The New York Times bestseller list. Ferriss is not without his critics, but devotees are convinced that his advice is life-changing. Certainly, he'll get you thinking about the way we define success and how to achieve it, as well as how to get things done efficiently.
  • When You Can't Quit Your Horrible Job, Do These 5 Things
    Short of living with someone you can't stand – sorry, parents of surly teenagers and people with weird Craigslist roommates – there's nothing that will make you unhappier than hating your job. That's partly because most of us spend the bulk of our waking hours at work, and partly because work provides us with a sense of identity. What's the first question you ask someone at a party? Often, it's: "What do you do?"
  • Business Professors, Their Students, and Narcissism: What You Need to Know
    Narcissistic Personality Disorder is no joke, and it's not just about vanity and self-absorption, as a cursory understanding of its mythological namesake might suggest. Instead, it's a serious pathology that manifests in about six percent of the general population. It is more common in men, and the most extreme symptoms tend to be exhibited during a person's 40s and 50s.
  • 6 Emotions You'll Experience During a Job Change
    Leaving one job to pursue another can be a bittersweet time in your career. On one hand, you're glad that you have this new, promising opportunity lying ahead, but it's also scary and unfamiliar. You may even struggle with feelings of guilt and sadness as you leave your current employer and co-workers behind. However, making the switch from one job to another doesn't have to be an emotional roller coaster, if you know what to expect. Here are six emotions you're probably going to experience during this transitional phase in your career.
  • The 5 Best High Schools in the U.S., According to U.S. News
    High school students in the U.S. have a college readiness problem. According to a report from testing organization ACT, only 40 percent of students taking the ACT met three or four college readiness benchmarks, which correlate with stronger likelihood of success in postsecondary education. However, taking college preparatory core curriculum classes increased students' chances of meeting these benchmarks; 49 percent of "core-taking" students met the math benchmark, for example, compared to 27 percent of non-core-taking students. In short, academic preparation in high school is essential to a good college experience – and a successful career after graduation.
  • What Millennial Workers Value Above Everything Else
    Millennials are now the largest generation in the U.S. labor force, and as such, a group to be reckoned with. You might assume that because this generation experienced the Great Recession during such a formative period of their lives (causing an effect that has been dubbed The Great Delay) that they would value their paycheck above all else. Surely, this generation must be anxious, more than anything else, to earn. Right?! Well, actually, that's not exactly the case. Let's take a look at what millennials are really after, and what workers from other generations can learn from them.
  • Rewards and Incentives: Do They Really Work?
    Rewards and incentive programs are a part of professional life for many. But, do they actually do what they're supposed to do – make us work more productively? Research has indicated that while these programs might make people work harder, they might not help anyone work smarter. Is performance really improved by incentive programs and rewards? Let's take a look at some of the most recent findings on the matter.
  • 5 Benefits of Career Coaching That You Need to Know
    We humans are a weird bunch, especially when it comes to our careers. If we want to lose weight or get in shape, then we get a gym membership and hire a personal trainer. If we go through a difficult time in our lives, then we hire a therapist for guidance. However, if we need help in our careers, we hardly ever think to hire a career coach – but why? Read on to find out why having a career coach on your side can make all the difference in your career.

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