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Why the 40-Hour Workweek Needs to Make a Comeback [infographic]

Most of us are paid according to the standard workweek of 40 hours, but let's face it: for 75 percent of Americans, the actual workweek is far more than that. This infographic marshals forth evidence that it's time to bring back the 40-hour workweek to protect productivity and employees' sanity.

Most of us are paid according to the standard workweek of 40 hours, but let’s face it: for 75 percent of Americans, the actual workweek is far more than that. This infographic marshals forth evidence that it’s time to bring back the 40-hour workweek to protect productivity and employees’ sanity.

Despite advances in technology, we’re working more than ever before — and making less for our efforts. In 1970, the average workweek was 35 hours and workers made an average of $59,000 annually when adjusted for inflation. Fast forward to 2012, and workers are putting in an average of 46 hours each week for the privilege of an average $51,000 income.

The idea of a stay-at-home parent has also largely fallen by the wayside. While 8 in 10 American kids had just one parent who worked in 1960, in 2012, 7 in 10 kids have parents who both work. What’s more, 33 percent of the U.S. workforce puts in over 50 hours a week at work.

Check out more troubling statistics below. Do you think we should return to a 40-hour workweek?

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(Photo credit: Opposing Views/OnlineMBA)

Marissa Brassfield
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